Ride report? - and cycling with dogs



W

Will Cove

Guest
Mark Thompson wrote:

> Hey, hows about posting a ride report? I'm sure someone could lend
> you a bike.


To be honest, nothing much to report. Although both my bikes are basic,
they are adequate for my level of recreational riding. In my youth I used
to go touring each year (up to a thousand miles in a fortnight with
overnight stops at campsites or youth hostels). However, having spent over
half a century on this planet, I tend to take it easier these days.

The last time out (Sunday) was only about twelve miles on the quieter
branch of the Camel trail between the Borough Arms, Bodmin and the end of
the new extension at Wenford. My wife and I had our dog (a labrador) with
us, so we didn't really get up to speed and hence the short trip. This was
the first time we'd taken the dog with us on a cycle trail and we wanted to
try a reasonably quiet route to check she was OK with other cyclists,
pedestrians, and dogs.

We set out at about 1:30 pm. At first, the dog was a little skittish but
soon settled down to a comfortable trot behind me and in front of my wife.
We found that formation was the best because the dog kept running around me
and getting perilously close to my front wheel unless I took the front. We
made frequent stops - mainly to give the dog a drink but also to admire
views of the river Camel in full spate. Between us, we used two bottles of
water - with the dog consuming (or rather, spilling) most of that. (Note to
self: take plastic dog bowl next time!) Our average speed was a pitiful 5-
ish mph, which was about as fast as our dog could comfortably go. The Camel
Trail between the Borough Arms and Wenford had a good covering of mud and
wet leaves in places - so the surface was a little slippery and I was glad
of the excuse to go slowly. We got back to the Borough Arms just before
dark and had an excellent meal there, with the staff taking pity on the dog
and feeding her scraps from the carvery!

Overall, the trip was a success. After half a mile or so, the dog settled
down nicely and kept up a steady pace. When we came to road crossings, she
answered the recall immediately and happily walked alongside me on-lead
without pulling. However, the sort of ride I normally do (twenty to thirty
mile round trip) would be too much for her. My wife suggested we consider a
trailer so that the dog could ride when we wanted to push on, use shared
roads, or undertake longer trips. (Guess who'd be pulling the trailer!)

Weather permitting, we're taking the dog out again this weekend - but it'll
be a shorter trip with the emphasis on working with the dog. The aim is to
have her off the lead and properly under control at all times by the summer
so that we can take the bikes, dog, and caravan to explore trails further
afield.

So, does anyone else take their dog cycling? Does anyone use a trailer as a
pet carrier? Any tips for cycling with dogs?
 
D

dkahn400

Guest
Will Cove wrote:

> So, does anyone else take their dog cycling? Does anyone use a trailer as a
> pet carrier? Any tips for cycling with dogs?


Pull or be pulled. <http://www.tonystrailers.com/dog/>

--
Dave...
 
M

Mark Thompson

Guest
>> Hey, hows about posting a ride report? I'm sure someone could lend
>> you a bike.


> The last time out (Sunday) was <snipped>


More like it! Knee injury means I'm off-bike for the next n weeks/months,
and I'm getting desperate to get back on. Ride reports are the only thing
that keep me going[1].

[1] as well as making inane posts and throwing myself into ever more work
displacement activity to soak up the extra free time.
 
W

Will Cove

Guest
"dkahn400" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

>> So, does anyone else take their dog cycling? Does anyone use a
>> trailer as a pet carrier? Any tips for cycling with dogs?

>
> Pull or be pulled. <http://www.tonystrailers.com/dog/>
>


Thanks for that - bookmarked. Although she'll probably build up the stamina
to run twenty or thirty miles, labradors aren't renowned for speed. Also, I
wouldn't like to take her on the road off lead. So, I'd be pulling her!

She's about 30kg so the smaller trailers won't be much good. I had thought
of buying a "kiddie trailer" from a local hire company and adapting it -
but it's good to see what the purpose-built ones are like.

Again, thanks.
 
D

Danny Colyer

Guest
Mark Thompson wrote:
> More like it! Knee injury means I'm off-bike for the next n weeks/months,
> and I'm getting desperate to get back on.


I feel for you. Let's hope it's weeks and not months.

> Ride reports are the only thing
> that keep me going[1].


Well, I've got a few at
<url:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/cycling/ridereports/> and if you
fancy branching out a bit then I can strongly recommend going to Google
Groups and searching for posts to rec.sport.unicycling by Mikefule. His
ride reports tend to be long, but they're always worth the time it takes
to read them.

--
Danny Colyer <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
Reply address is valid, but that on my website is checked more often
"He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
 
W

Will Cove

Guest
Mark Thompson
<[email protected]*_turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> Knee injury means I'm off-bike for the next n weeks/months,
> and I'm getting desperate to get back on.


Ouch! sorry to hear that - you have my wishes for a speedy recovery.
 
S

Steve Watkin

Guest
VeloVision magazine did a whole article on pet transporting some time ago.

SW


"Will Cove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Mark Thompson wrote:
>
>> Hey, hows about posting a ride report? I'm sure someone could lend
>> you a bike.

>
> To be honest, nothing much to report. Although both my bikes are basic,
> they are adequate for my level of recreational riding. In my youth I used
> to go touring each year (up to a thousand miles in a fortnight with
> overnight stops at campsites or youth hostels). However, having spent over
> half a century on this planet, I tend to take it easier these days.
>
> The last time out (Sunday) was only about twelve miles on the quieter
> branch of the Camel trail between the Borough Arms, Bodmin and the end of
> the new extension at Wenford. My wife and I had our dog (a labrador) with
> us, so we didn't really get up to speed and hence the short trip. This was
> the first time we'd taken the dog with us on a cycle trail and we wanted
> to
> try a reasonably quiet route to check she was OK with other cyclists,
> pedestrians, and dogs.
>
> We set out at about 1:30 pm. At first, the dog was a little skittish but
> soon settled down to a comfortable trot behind me and in front of my wife.
> We found that formation was the best because the dog kept running around
> me
> and getting perilously close to my front wheel unless I took the front. We
> made frequent stops - mainly to give the dog a drink but also to admire
> views of the river Camel in full spate. Between us, we used two bottles of
> water - with the dog consuming (or rather, spilling) most of that. (Note
> to
> self: take plastic dog bowl next time!) Our average speed was a pitiful 5-
> ish mph, which was about as fast as our dog could comfortably go. The
> Camel
> Trail between the Borough Arms and Wenford had a good covering of mud and
> wet leaves in places - so the surface was a little slippery and I was glad
> of the excuse to go slowly. We got back to the Borough Arms just before
> dark and had an excellent meal there, with the staff taking pity on the
> dog
> and feeding her scraps from the carvery!
>
> Overall, the trip was a success. After half a mile or so, the dog settled
> down nicely and kept up a steady pace. When we came to road crossings, she
> answered the recall immediately and happily walked alongside me on-lead
> without pulling. However, the sort of ride I normally do (twenty to thirty
> mile round trip) would be too much for her. My wife suggested we consider
> a
> trailer so that the dog could ride when we wanted to push on, use shared
> roads, or undertake longer trips. (Guess who'd be pulling the trailer!)
>
> Weather permitting, we're taking the dog out again this weekend - but
> it'll
> be a shorter trip with the emphasis on working with the dog. The aim is to
> have her off the lead and properly under control at all times by the
> summer
> so that we can take the bikes, dog, and caravan to explore trails further
> afield.
>
> So, does anyone else take their dog cycling? Does anyone use a trailer as
> a
> pet carrier? Any tips for cycling with dogs?
 
W

Will Cove

Guest
"Steve Watkin" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> VeloVision magazine did a whole article on pet transporting some time
> ago.


Thanks.

I've just checked their website and found a thread on the subject
(http://www.velovision.co.uk/cgi-bin/show_comments.pl?storynum=501) and a
link to http://www.bikesandtrailers.com/bike-trailers/doghod.html - which
looks remarkably like the "kiddy trailers" I thought about converting to
carry my dog.

Also there was an article that showed a GSD between the shafts of what
looked like a Shetland trap - but I don't think it'd work with a lab!
http://www.velovision.co.uk/cgi-bin/show_comments.pl?storynum=161

Thanks again.
 
S

Steve Watkin

Guest
The original article was in Issue 12 dec 2003. I think back issues are
available. BTW its an excellent read and one of the few really practical,
non glitzy, cycle mags out there.

SW


"Will Cove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Steve Watkin" <[email protected]> wrote in
> news:[email protected]:
>
>> VeloVision magazine did a whole article on pet transporting some time
>> ago.

>
> Thanks.
>
> I've just checked their website and found a thread on the subject
> (http://www.velovision.co.uk/cgi-bin/show_comments.pl?storynum=501) and a
> link to http://www.bikesandtrailers.com/bike-trailers/doghod.html - which
> looks remarkably like the "kiddy trailers" I thought about converting to
> carry my dog.
>
> Also there was an article that showed a GSD between the shafts of what
> looked like a Shetland trap - but I don't think it'd work with a lab!
> http://www.velovision.co.uk/cgi-bin/show_comments.pl?storynum=161
>
> Thanks again.
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
Will Cove <[email protected]> wrote:
> "dkahn400" <[email protected]> wrote in
> news:[email protected]:
>
> >> So, does anyone else take their dog cycling? Does anyone use a
> >> trailer as a pet carrier? Any tips for cycling with dogs?

> >
> > Pull or be pulled. <http://www.tonystrailers.com/dog/>
> >

>
> Thanks for that - bookmarked. Although she'll probably build up the stamina
> to run twenty or thirty miles, labradors aren't renowned for speed. Also, I
> wouldn't like to take her on the road off lead. So, I'd be pulling her!
>
> She's about 30kg so the smaller trailers won't be much good. I had thought
> of buying a "kiddie trailer" from a local hire company and adapting it -
> but it's good to see what the purpose-built ones are like.
>

If she's fairly placid and obedient I reckon a trailer that lets her hop
on and off when she feels like it or when you tell her would be a good
idea, and from the sort of riding you describe I reckon a single-track
trailer would be an advantage, so a single-track low-loader style
contraption with lowish sides might be a good solution. Something like
this:

http://missioncycles.co.uk/Folding_Trikes.asp?Products_Action=Find
('ProductID','66')

http://tinyurl.com/yezrj9
 
W

Will Cove

Guest
Rob Morley <[email protected]> wrote in news:MPG.1fe4cf3fdcb93e8b98a937
@news.individual.net:

> If she's fairly placid and obedient I reckon a trailer that lets her hop
> on and off when she feels like it or when you tell her would be a good
> idea, and from the sort of riding you describe I reckon a single-track
> trailer would be an advantage, so a single-track low-loader style
> contraption with lowish sides might be a good solution.


Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure that an open trailer would work
because we took her out on the Camel Trail today and at times she showed
how disobedient she can be! I didn't get the time to take her out for her
usual 2 x half-hour walks yesterday and she had a lot of "mischievous
energy" today. She's six, but hasn't lost the "puppy gene".

While a single-track would be nice, I wouldn't take a trailer on the sort
of rides where it would really come into its own (i.e. moorland bridleways)
She can run rings round me on those rides, and I tend to keep them short.

One advantage to using a closed trailer would be that we could ride on
shared roads rather than pushing the bikes with the dog on-lead. For
example, that will let us ride from the Caravan Club site at Baltic Warf,
Bristol to the start of the Bristol to Bath (a trip we have planned for
next year).

So at the moment, http://tinyurl.com/yh6t7s looks good. The XL version
might be our best option because I suspect it folds up quicker and it
doubles up as a travel crate/bed. At about half a metre, the track is
narrower than my handlebars, so hopefully the width won't be an issue. I
need to investigate whether the cover comes off to convert to a flatbed so
that she could just hop on and off when we ride dedicated trails (and also,
a flatbed trailer would be useful for other things).

Thanks again - much appreciated.
 
W

Will Cove

Guest
Alex Potter <[email protected]> wrote in news:i1Geh.14162
[email protected]:

>> http://missioncycles.co.uk/Folding_Trikes.asp?Products_Action=Find
>> ('ProductID','66')
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/yezrj9

> Site is totally unusable in Konqueror. Why don't people comply with
> standards?


Are you sure? It works for me using Konqueror 3.3.1-5.13 under CentOS 4.3.
Perhaps the font rendering isn't so clever (because they've specified a
windoze-specific font or two) and some of the images are cropped, but it's
better than many I've seen.

HTH
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
Will Cove <[email protected]> wrote:
<snip>
> So at the moment, http://tinyurl.com/yh6t7s looks good. The XL version
> might be our best option because I suspect it folds up quicker and it
> doubles up as a travel crate/bed. At about half a metre, the track is
> narrower than my handlebars, so hopefully the width won't be an issue. I
> need to investigate whether the cover comes off to convert to a flatbed so
> that she could just hop on and off when we ride dedicated trails (and also,
> a flatbed trailer would be useful for other things).
>

I suspect that you can collapse the superstructure but not remove it, I
don't know how usable it would be in that state.
 
D

Danny Colyer

Guest
Will Cove wrote:
> Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure that an open trailer would work
> because we took her out on the Camel Trail today and at times she showed
> how disobedient she can be!


I hope she wasn't running loose on the Camel Trail. One of my pet hates
is dog walkers who ignore HC rule 42 and endanger cyclists by letting
their dogs run free on cyclepaths.


--
Danny Colyer <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
Reply address is valid, but that on my website is checked more often
"He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
 
W

Will Cove

Guest
Danny Colyer <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

>> Thanks for the suggestion. I'm not sure that an open trailer would
>> work because we took her out on the Camel Trail today and at times
>> she showed how disobedient she can be!

>
> I hope she wasn't running loose on the Camel Trail. One of my pet
> hates is dog walkers who ignore HC rule 42 and endanger cyclists by
> letting their dogs run free on cyclepaths.


Off lead? Yes; running loose on the Camel Trail? No. She's a natural
beater and heads for the undergrowth when the mood takes her. She's
friendly with walkers and dogs, and wary of cycles. Although she can be
disobedient at times, she rarely ignores recall commands and never
ignores "sit" or "down".

That said, to endanger cyclists there have to be cyclists - and we only
saw one cyclist, eight or nine walkers, two other dogs, and two fishermen
in the two and a half hours we were on the trail. For info, the reason
why we're using this stretch to train her is because it is almost
deserted out of tourist season.

Continuing the saga of training our lab: The aim today was to get her to
trot to heel, with "heel" being my back wheel. Every time she ran ahead,
we turned around, rode in the opposite direction, issued a recall, and
gave the heel command as she got close. While the stretch we rode was
only three miles in each direction, I suspect that the frequent changes
of direction meant I actually rode nine or ten by the time we got back to
the van.

The day was a partial success. As I wrote earlier, she had mischievous
energy to burn. She wanted to go swimming - but the Camel in full spate
is a bit swift even for a labrador, and I stopped her well before she got
to the bank. In addition to changing direction each time she went ahead,
I also used half a bag of her favourite treats rewarding good behaviour.
After about an hour, she got the idea and trotted alongside me much of
the time.

Hopefully, by the summer she'll be bulletproof. Nonetheless I won't feel
completely at ease on a crowded cycleway or shared use road unless she's
on the lead or in a trailer. On that subject, I've found a couple of
gizmos that might be worth considering. These attach to the bike and act
as shock absorbers, so you can keep the dog on lead and have a reasonable
chance of keeping the bike under control if the dog pulls. That said,
she's a strong dog and I'm not completely sure how good these things are.
The products are the "Walky Dog" and "Springer" described at
http://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/dogs/dog_accessories_outdoor/bike_car
If anyone has used either (particularly with a large-ish breed), or knows
an alternative product, I'd love to hear your experiences.
 
D

Danny Colyer

Guest
Will Cove wrote:
> Off lead? Yes; running loose on the Camel Trail? No. She's a natural
> beater and heads for the undergrowth when the mood takes her. She's
> friendly with walkers and dogs, and wary of cycles. Although she can be
> disobedient at times, she rarely ignores recall commands and never
> ignores "sit" or "down".


Fairy nuff. It was the bit about being disobedient that concerned me.
If you have adequate control over the animal and are alert to the
presence of cyclists, then there shouldn't be a problem (though I would
still be extremely wary of an unfamiliar dog off the lead).

I meet a few dogs off the lead every morning, but it's mostly the same
dogs, I've seen them and their owners day after day for years and I know
which ones can be trusted. I have also, though, seen POBs walking dogs
with no regard for anyone else on the path.

> Hopefully, by the summer she'll be bulletproof. Nonetheless I won't feel
> completely at ease on a crowded cycleway or shared use road unless she's
> on the lead or in a trailer.


Pleased to read it.

> On that subject, I've found a couple of
> gizmos that might be worth considering. These attach to the bike and act
> as shock absorbers, so you can keep the dog on lead and have a reasonable
> chance of keeping the bike under control if the dog pulls. That said,
> she's a strong dog and I'm not completely sure how good these things are.
> The products are the "Walky Dog" and "Springer" described at
> http://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/dogs/dog_accessories_outdoor/bike_car


Something like that got a good review in one of the bike mags a few
years ago (C+ IIRC). I can't tell you any more than that, though. When
I saw the picture with the review it conjured up images of someone
riding along one side of the cyclepath, dog on the other side, lead
stretched across the middle...

--
Danny Colyer <URL:http://www.colyer.plus.com/danny/>
Reply address is valid, but that on my website is checked more often
"He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Will Cove wrote:
These attach to the bike and act
> as shock absorbers, so you can keep the dog on lead and have a reasonable
> chance of keeping the bike under control if the dog pulls. That said,
> she's a strong dog and I'm not completely sure how good these things are.
> The products are the "Walky Dog" and "Springer" described at
> http://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/dogs/dog_accessories_outdoor/bike_car
> If anyone has used either (particularly with a large-ish breed), or knows
> an alternative product, I'd love to hear your experiences.


Not used them but th espringer one is very popular in Norway. Seems to
be fine if you are on the ball and your dog is well behaved.

...d
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
Alex Potter <[email protected]> wrote:
> Rob Morley wrote:
>
> > Something like
> > this:
> >
> > http://missioncycles.co.uk/Folding_Trikes.asp?Products_Action=Find
> > ('ProductID','66')
> >
> > http://tinyurl.com/yezrj9

> Site is totally unusable in Konqueror. Why don't people comply with
> standards?
>

It's the same old problem of web developers using HTML as if it were
some sort of DTP tool, with no regard for cross-platform compatibility,
and their customers not being knowledgeable enough to reject their
shoddy work. Hopefully things are getting better - these days there
aren't so many sites that fail completely if you're not using Internet
Explorer, or that look stupid if your screen isn't set to the same
resolution as the developer used, but there's still a long way to go.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Rob Morley wrote on 12/12/2006 12:04 +0100:
> It's the same old problem of web developers using HTML as if it were
> some sort of DTP tool, with no regard for cross-platform compatibility,
> and their customers not being knowledgeable enough to reject their
> shoddy work. Hopefully things are getting better - these days there
> aren't so many sites that fail completely if you're not using Internet
> Explorer, or that look stupid if your screen isn't set to the same
> resolution as the developer used, but there's still a long way to go.


Well there's no real excuse with HTML validation so easily available
http://validator.w3.org/

--
Tony

"...has many omissions and contains much that is apocryphal, or at least
wildly inaccurate..."
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