Ride Report - Aviemore

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tim Hall, Feb 25, 2004.

  1. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    I've been away for a few days, to Aviemore allegedly for a bit of climbing. However after 4 days, my
    ankle was playing up (turned it on a rock or boots laced too tightly), so I and chum Jez enquired
    into bike hire. The very helpful warden at Aviemore Youth Hostel pointed us at Speyside sports (I
    think) who confirmed they had 4 bikes left (this being the so called skiing season, bikes a bit thin
    on the ground).

    After getting our selves in order we walked to the shop, laden with credit cards and proof of ID,
    none of which was needed. Two Specialized Rockhoppers of uncertain age and uncertain maintenance
    awaited us. It was 10:00, so the proprietor said call it half a day, we close at 5:30 so back by
    five lads. Eight quid each, good value in my book. I persuaded him to spray some lube on the chains
    and off we went.

    First stop the tourist info office to buy a map showing the various trails round the area - we
    plumped for one showing the Rothiemurcus Estate and off we went.

    I'm not an off road cyclist usually, give or take a bit of rough stuff on the tadem club rides, so
    our ride might seem a bit tame. We found our way fairly easily on broad tracks on a cold day with a
    sprinkling of snow. About ten minutes into the ride we stopped for our first wildlife moment, as a
    red squirrel ran across our path. Neat.

    Off gently through the forest, we skirted a lochan the over a foot bridge and to Loch Morlich.
    Across the road and round the back of Glemore Lodge to a coffee and bun stop at the reindeer centre.
    We then headed over the hill to the north towards Boat of Garten. Stunning views of Cairngorm and
    the Northern Corries as we looked back.

    The next wildlife moment came as we disturbed three deeer grazing by the edge of the track. Neat
    again. Up through the forest then down towards the road, through a bit shown as "marshy" on the map.
    Except it was very cold, so what was marsh was now ice. Interesting. We managed it without fallig
    over and stopped at the road for a pie from the backpack. Then wildlife moment three. A pine martin
    scampering in the woods across the road. Really neat.

    We broke out the OS map as we'd nearly finished the other one and it was only two o'clock. Up
    towards Loch Garten on really small lanes then picking up the Speyside Trail back towards Aviemore.
    Wildlife moment four as we saw buzzards looking to feast on flagging cyclists.

    By now we were getting shagged out, heading into the wind, so stopped for the last of our coffee and
    sarnies. A few nmore miles and back to the shop by half four.

    An entirely excellent day, 48km.

    Tim
     
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  2. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Tim Hall <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > A pine martin scampering in the woods across the road. Really neat.
    >

    You lucky bugger! I don't know how many years I've been around Scotland by bike and canoe (another
    excellent wildlife spotting platform) and I've never seen a pine marten. Apparently they are
    becoming more common in some areas, but you're still doing well to see one.

    Graeme
     
  3. >Off gently through the forest, we skirted a lochan the over a foot bridge and to Loch Morlich.
    >Across the road and round the back of Glemore Lodge to a coffee and bun stop at the reindeer
    >centre. We then headed over the hill to the north towards Boat of Garten. Stunning views of
    >Cairngorm and the Northern Corries as we looked back.
    >
    >The next wildlife moment came as we disturbed three deeer grazing by the edge of the track. Neat
    >again. Up through the forest then down towards the road, through a bit shown as "marshy" on the
    >map. Except it was very cold, so what was marsh was now ice. Interesting. We managed it without
    >fallig over and stopped at the road for a pie from the backpack. Then wildlife moment three. A pine
    >martin scampering in the woods across the road. Really neat.
    >
    >We broke out the OS map as we'd nearly finished the other one and it was only two o'clock. Up
    >towards Loch Garten on really small lanes then picking up the Speyside Trail back towards Aviemore.
    >Wildlife moment four as we saw buzzards looking to feast on flagging cyclists.
    >
    >By now we were getting shagged out, heading into the wind, so stopped for the last of our coffee
    >and sarnies. A few nmore miles and back to the shop by half four.
    >
    >An entirely excellent day, 48km.

    Sounds *lovely*. If I go out on a very early morning cycle ride round the lanes by me, I will
    occasionally round a corner to be met by a deer standing by or on the road. They run off pretty
    quickly - possibly the sight of a large lady resplendent in acres of bright yellow is a tad too much
    for them ;-)

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get correct one remove dependency on fame &
    fortune h*$el*$$e**nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$
     
  4. Terry

    Terry Guest

    > never seen a pine marten. Apparently they are becoming more common in some areas, but you're still
    > doing well to see one.

    We were up at Braes of Glenlivet last week, and couldn't cycle because of a fracture on one of the
    boys, but very fine walking weather it was.

    We saw a white largish thing run across the path in a pine wood.Would that be a stoat , or do
    martens also go white in winter?

    The alpine hares were out in force also and looked particularly embarrassed in the snowless heather.

    TerryJ
     
  5. Frobnitz

    Frobnitz Guest

    "Terry" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > never seen a pine marten. Apparently they are becoming more common in
    some
    > > areas, but you're still doing well to see one.

    I saw martens on a couple of occasions on the Kinloch Rannoch - Schiehallion road last year, which
    was the first time I've seen them.

    > We were up at Braes of Glenlivet last week, and couldn't cycle because of a fracture on one of the
    > boys, but very fine walking weather it was.
    >
    > We saw a white largish thing run across the path in a pine wood.Would that be a stoat , or do
    > martens also go white in winter?

    That'll have been a stoat (or ermine, if you're posh). Cycling on the B709 to Innerleithen a couple
    of years ago I saw a pair of stoats fighting/playing, it's hard to tell - amazing sight, they looked
    like a pair of short furry snakes twined round each other into a fluid ball that tumbled across the
    road, totally oblivious to me sitting staring at them from about 2 meters range.

    It's one of the main things I love about cycling, the amount of birds and beasts seen from the
    saddle/seat seems to be an order of magnitude higher than that seen from a car (although possibly
    not as much as when walking). I'll be out this weekend with my books and binocs in the bag -
    hopefully, if the weather gods are obliging..

    E
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Frobnitz wrote:

    > It's one of the main things I love about cycling, the amount of birds and beasts seen from the
    > saddle/seat seems to be an order of magnitude higher than that seen from a car (although possibly
    > not as much as when walking).

    Though you're going faster and can miss stuff, also the case that you can close in on things at
    higher speed without it noticing you, so I'd say you're worse off for the small stuff but medium and
    large probably better on the bike to some extent.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Frobnitz" <[email protected]> wrote

    > It's one of the main things I love about cycling, the amount of birds and beasts seen from the
    > saddle/seat seems to be an order of magnitude higher than that seen from a car (although possibly
    > not as much as when walking).

    Stuff might certainly be easier to spot when walking but often I've found that if I'm on a bike or
    running along a track and there are deer or something off to the side they'll be more likely to just
    stand and watch me go by than if I was walking. I think they realise you're not interested in them
    whereas if you're approaching slowly on foot you look more of a potential threat.
     
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