ride the classics

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by davek, Aug 3, 2004.

  1. davek

    davek Guest

    After seeing A Sunday In Hell last night, it has made me want to have a
    go at riding the route of the Paris-Roubaix.

    A quick Google turned up this:
    <URL:http://www.letour.fr/stf/roubaix/2004/us/parcours.html>

    and this:
    <URL:http://www.sportingtours.co.uk/events/roubaix.html>

    Just a couple of questions -

    Has anyone done the route? Is it easy to follow? Are the roads all
    accessible?

    And has anyone ever done a Graham Baxter ride or similar? It seems like
    a fairly pricey way to do it, but is it worth the money to have all the
    organisation done for you?

    cheers,

    d.
     
    Tags:


  2. davek wrote:
    > After seeing A Sunday In Hell last night, it has made me want to have
    > a go at riding the route of the Paris-Roubaix.
    >
    > A quick Google turned up this:
    > <URL:http://www.letour.fr/stf/roubaix/2004/us/parcours.html>
    >
    > and this:
    > <URL:http://www.sportingtours.co.uk/events/roubaix.html>
    >
    > Just a couple of questions -
    >
    > Has anyone done the route? Is it easy to follow? Are the roads all
    > accessible?
    >
    > And has anyone ever done a Graham Baxter ride or similar? It seems
    > like a fairly pricey way to do it, but is it worth the money to have
    > all the organisation done for you?
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > d.


    I have ridden parts of the Tour of Flanders course immediately prior to the
    race. There is a randonee on the day before also. IMHO following the route
    of the Ronde would be very difficult without signage, they use very small
    farm roads and there are a lot of them in Flanders. I believe the pave
    sections of Paris Roubaix are not public roads anymore but you may be able
    to cycle on them without problem. Since they are not public roads they may
    not figure on ordinary maps and you may need pretty detailed ones. I think
    getting on one of the randonees is the best bet.
     
  3. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Tue, 3 Aug 2004 15:40:40 +0100, Martin 'MSeries' Newstead wrote:

    >davek wrote:
    >> After seeing A Sunday In Hell last night, it has made me want to have
    >> a go at riding the route of the Paris-Roubaix.
    >>
    >> A quick Google turned up this:
    >> <URL:http://www.letour.fr/stf/roubaix/2004/us/parcours.html>
    >>
    >> and this:
    >> <URL:http://www.sportingtours.co.uk/events/roubaix.html>
    >>
    >> Just a couple of questions -
    >>
    >> Has anyone done the route? Is it easy to follow? Are the roads all
    >> accessible?
    >>
    >> And has anyone ever done a Graham Baxter ride or similar? It seems
    >> like a fairly pricey way to do it, but is it worth the money to have
    >> all the organisation done for you?


    >I have ridden parts of the Tour of Flanders course immediately prior to the
    >race. There is a randonee on the day before also. IMHO following the route
    >of the Ronde would be very difficult without signage, they use very small
    >farm roads and there are a lot of them in Flanders. I believe the pave
    >sections of Paris Roubaix are not public roads anymore but you may be able
    >to cycle on them without problem. Since they are not public roads they may
    >not figure on ordinary maps and you may need pretty detailed ones. I think
    >getting on one of the randonees is the best bet.


    The route given in the itinerary on the site is pretty detailed.
    http://www.letour.fr/stf/roubaix/2004/us/parcours_iti_01.html

    The tiniest roads feature on Michelin maps (just like OS maps you need
    the right scale) so if you put the place names into the map search at
    www.viamichelin.com with a lot of preparation you should be able to
    follow it. Whether you want all the hassle of route finding or want to
    pay somebody else to do it is upto you to decide.

    I've ridden some back road pave sections in Belgium and there is a
    definite technique to be mastered. You have to ride fast enough and
    lose enough to "float" over the top. Make sure your bike is tightly
    screwed together!
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  4. Dan Gregory

    Dan Gregory Guest

    "Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> Has anyone done the route? Is it easy to follow? Are the roads all
    > >> accessible?

    If you do it in the wet check inside your tyres afterwards if you use
    clinchers. Otherwise the mud that is forced in as a kind of liquid sludge
    will dry out and there will be a very penetrative gritty dust in there to
    puncture your tubes..
    Yes we learnt the hard way after a short reconnaissance before pounding them
    the nexxt (dry) day.
    All the best
    Dan Gregory


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.732 / Virus Database: 486 - Release Date: 29/07/04
     
  5. Phil Cook wrote:

    > The route given in the itinerary on the site is pretty detailed.
    > http://www.letour.fr/stf/roubaix/2004/us/parcours_iti_01.html
    >
    > The tiniest roads feature on Michelin maps (just like OS maps you need
    > the right scale) so if you put the place names into the map search at
    > www.viamichelin.com with a lot of preparation you should be able to
    > follow it. Whether you want all the hassle of route finding or want to
    > pay somebody else to do it is upto you to decide.


    But then following the map is sometimes less than easy.

    >
    > I've ridden some back road pave sections in Belgium and there is a
    > definite technique to be mastered. You have to ride fast enough and
    > lose enough to "float" over the top. Make sure your bike is tightly
    > screwed together!



    This is hard up the Muur de Grammont ! I made it though :)
     
  6. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Dan Gregory wrote:

    > "Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >>>>Has anyone done the route? Is it easy to follow? Are the roads all
    >>>>accessible?

    >
    > If you do it in the wet check inside your tyres afterwards if you use
    > clinchers.


    What are clinchers?

    --


    Velvet
     
  7. Velvet wrote:
    > Dan Gregory wrote:
    >
    >> "Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >>>>> Has anyone done the route? Is it easy to follow? Are the roads all
    >>>>> accessible?

    >>
    >> If you do it in the wet check inside your tyres afterwards if you use
    >> clinchers.

    >
    > What are clinchers?


    Tryes with separate inner tubes i.e. not tubular tyres.
     
  8. davek

    davek Guest

    Martin 'MSeries' Newstead wrote:
    >IMHO following the route
    > of the Ronde would be very difficult without signage, they use very small
    > farm roads and there are a lot of them in Flanders.


    Hmm. And nary a signpost between them, I suspect.

    >I believe the pave
    > sections of Paris Roubaix are not public roads anymore but you may be able
    > to cycle on them without problem.


    That's what I'm wondering, really - I know they aren't 'public' roads,
    but to what extent are they 'private' roads? There are loads of
    'private' farm roads round here that you /can/ cycle on, but I'm not
    sure you are supposed to and I'm not sure what the farmer would do if he
    caught you - probably shoot you and feed you to his cattle.

    > I think
    > getting on one of the randonees is the best bet.


    I think you may be right.

    d.
     
  9. davek

    davek Guest

    Phil Cook wrote:
    > with a lot of preparation you should be able to
    > follow it.


    There's the rub.

    > Whether you want all the hassle of route finding or want to
    > pay somebody else to do it is upto you to decide.


    Yes, but it would be nice to know if there are other people that have
    attempted to do it entirely self-sufficiently, and if they have any
    useful info to pass on.

    > I've ridden some back road pave sections in Belgium and there is a
    > definite technique to be mastered. You have to ride fast enough and
    > lose enough to "float" over the top.


    Thanks for the tip - I'll try to remember that if I ever do attempt it.

    d.
     
  10. davek

    davek Guest

    Dan Gregory wrote:
    > Yes we learnt the hard way after a short reconnaissance before pounding them
    > the nexxt (dry) day.


    Crumbs. That's certainly not something that would have occurred to me as
    a potential problem. Does this depend on type/size of tyre or does it
    affect all tyres?

    What tyres do the pros use on these types of race? Do they use fatter
    tyres than normal?

    d.
     
  11. davek

    davek Guest

    Velvet wrote:
    > What are clinchers?


    Tyres with a U-shaped profile and a wire 'bead' that is 'clinched'
    inside a hooked wheel rim. Basically, the kind of tyres that need an
    inner tube to keep the air in - as opposed to tubulars (aka 'tubs', aka
    'sew-ups') which are glued to the wheel rim and don't need an inner tube.

    <URL:http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html>

    d.
     
  12. davek

    davek Guest

    for:
    >don't need an inner tube.


    read:
    don't need a /separate/ inner tube

    d.
     
  13. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    davek wrote:

    > Velvet wrote:
    >
    >> What are clinchers?

    >
    >
    > Tyres with a U-shaped profile and a wire 'bead' that is 'clinched'
    > inside a hooked wheel rim. Basically, the kind of tyres that need an
    > inner tube to keep the air in - as opposed to tubulars (aka 'tubs', aka
    > 'sew-ups') which are glued to the wheel rim and don't need an inner tube.
    >
    > <URL:http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html>
    >
    > d.


    Righto, thanks to you both :) I thought that's what they were, but
    thought it worth asking...

    So mud and stuff gets into the tyre even with the ones that run at
    100psi+? I can see the how, just suprised that it actually would manage
    it, but I guess over those cobbles...

    --


    Velvet
     
  14. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, davek ('[email protected]')
    wrote:

    > Dan Gregory wrote:
    >> Yes we learnt the hard way after a short reconnaissance before
    >> pounding them the nexxt (dry) day.

    >
    > Crumbs. That's certainly not something that would have occurred to me
    > as a potential problem. Does this depend on type/size of tyre or does
    > it affect all tyres?
    >
    > What tyres do the pros use on these types of race? Do they use fatter
    > tyres than normal?


    As I watched the beginning of the race in the film I made the assumption
    that when they hit the cobbles they'd change tyres. Mais non...

    That surface was *rough*.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    [ This .sig subject to change without notice ]
     
  15. David Cowie

    David Cowie Guest

    On Tue, 3 Aug 2004 13:11:07 +0000 (UTC), davek <[email protected]> wrote:

    >After seeing A Sunday In Hell last night, it has made me want to have a
    >go at riding the route of the Paris-Roubaix.
    >Just a couple of questions -
    >Has anyone done the route? Is it easy to follow? Are the roads all
    >accessible?
    >And has anyone ever done a Graham Baxter ride or similar? It seems like
    >a fairly pricey way to do it, but is it worth the money to have all the
    >organisation done for you?


    I did PR this year with Graham Baxter. Worth the couple of hundred
    quid to have it organised for you. Good fun to do it with a group of
    fellow sufferers.

    The PR is very long and the first 100km are not flat ! (unless you're
    a pro). 270km total. If you start at the cobbles it's only 170km.

    Entire route was marked out by yellow arrows (and odd spectators) at
    every junction. Took a few km to cotton on to the markings, as we were
    in a peleton of Italians hell bent on getting there as fast as the
    pro's. We let them go at 35 km :)

    Riding it on your own would be time consuming in looking at the map
    constantly and working out where to go. So many turns.

    Some cobble sections are farm tracks. Some of them go through fields
    with a gate, so they may be closed.

    1 month later and I still have tendonitis in the left wrist.

    + you get pictures !
    see
    http://sa-cycling.com/photos/pr2004/davidcowie_parisroubaix2004.jpg

    I'm still typing up a report and selecting pics, will post notice to
    newsgroup when finished. Questions welcome

    regards
    David

    ________________________________
    The independent cycling resource
    South African Cycling
    http://sa-cycling.com
     
  16. davek

    davek Guest

    David Cowie wrote:
    > I did PR this year with Graham Baxter. Worth the couple of hundred
    > quid to have it organised for you. Good fun to do it with a group of
    > fellow sufferers.

    ....
    > Riding it on your own would be time consuming in looking at the map
    > constantly and working out where to go. So many turns.


    I think you've just made up my mind for me. Now I'll have to see if the
    wife will let me have the time off.

    > 1 month later and I still have tendonitis in the left wrist.


    Nasty. It's really that bad, then...

    > + you get pictures !


    Nice!

    > I'm still typing up a report and selecting pics, will post notice to
    > newsgroup when finished. Questions welcome


    I look forward to it - I'll save questions until I've read your report
    (no pressure!)

    d.
     
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