Ride the Good Ride: P2E for the NBG!

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Andrew Heckman, Jun 2, 2003.

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  1. Hello fellow cyclists:

    Exactly one year ago today, I was run down by an inattentive motorist while riding my bike in
    northern Illinois. I survived, but just barely. However, I might not have been struck at all had
    there been an established system of bike paths and bike routes that connected major metropolitan
    areas of the United States. Imagine how great it would be if you could cycle from state to state --
    or even across the country -- on pathways reserved for cyclists and other non-motorized vehicles.
    And all along the path, you would find wonderful places to eat, sleep and relax that catered to the
    needs of cyclists.

    YOU CAN HELP JUST BY RIDING YOUR BIKE! Now you have a chance to help make that vision a reality, and
    have fun doing it! How? Ride P2E (Portland to Eugene) for the NBG (National Bicycle Greenway)! Each
    year, the NBG sponsors a cross-country relay that visits many major cities and garners support from
    elected officials for just such a nationwide system. Of course, nothing gets a politician's notice
    like a big crowd. So let's make some noise as the NBG relay rides from Portland, Oregon to Eugene,
    Oregon this year. The NBG has a few riders willing to make the trip (led by Mark Chen, who welcomes
    additional riders; just call him at 503-869-1597) but wouldn't it be great to send a big contingent
    showing big support?

    HERE ARE THE DETAILS: The relay is scheduled to arrive in Portland on July 18, depart on July 19 and
    arrive in Eugene July 21. Imagine that! A paltry 33 miles a day through the beautiful Willamette
    valley. Sounds like a vacation to me! You can even take the Amtrak back! Nor do you need to ride the
    whole trip. We'll be happy if you just show up at either end to support the good work of the NBG.
    How much you'd like to ride is up to you. And while the NBG touts the recumbent bike lifestyle, any
    pedal-powered vehicle is welcome...1 wheel, 2, 3, 4 wheels, upright, row-bike, hand-cycle...it
    doesn't matter. Come and show the world how joyful it is to bike!

    Click Here for the NBG home page: http://NationalBicycleGreenway.com

    Click Here For The Relay Schedule: http://www.bikeroute.com/NationalMayorsRide

    Click Here To Learn How to Become an Official Rider:
    http://NationalBicycleGreenway.com/Events/Mayors_Ride/getstarted.php

    Thank you, everyone. And be careful out there! Andrew Heckman, Fan of the OHPV (Oregon Human Power
    Vehicle Association) and the NBG
     
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  2. >Exactly one year ago today, I was run down by an inattentive motorist while riding my bike in
    >northern Illinois. I survived, but just barely. However, I might not have been struck at all had
    >there been an established system of bike paths and bike routes that connected major metropolitan
    >areas of the United States. Imagine how great it would be if you could cycle from state to state --
    >or even across the country -- on pathways reserved for cyclists and other non-motorized vehicles.
    >And all along the path, you would find wonderful places to eat, sleep and relax that catered to the
    >needs of cyclists.

    My sympathies with all you've had to go through, and drastic changes to your life as result. It is
    chilling to think as a fellow long distance cycle tourist and otherwise car-free rider, "that could
    have been me..."

    I agree roadway design is part of a solution. However, I'm also not convinced that a complete
    duplicate separate bike pathway network complete with signals at each crossing (such as in the
    Netherlands) is practical on scale in USA. So, the emphasis needs to be on routes as well as
    separate paths (Adventure Cycling and other organizations help here, as well as having local
    city/state planning departments design with bicycles in mind).

    I'm also not convinced that we should focus exclusively on facilities. One of the better papers I've
    found on bicycle advocacy is posted here: http://www.danenet.wicip.org/bcp/dilemma.html It talks
    about combinations of education, enforcement and roadway design together. Two of the dilemnas it
    presents (#7, #8) also talks about hazards of improperly designed bicycle facilities and too much
    emphasis on facilities and how they can occasionally make things less safe.

    --mev, Mike Vermeulen
     
  3. [[ This message was both posted and mailed: see the "To," "Cc," and "Newsgroups" headers for
    details. ]]

    In article <[email protected]>, Mike Vermeulen <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >Exactly one year ago today, I was run down by an inattentive motorist while riding my bike in
    > >northern Illinois. I survived, but just barely. However, I might not have been struck at all had
    > >there been an established system of bike paths and bike routes that connected major metropolitan
    > >areas of the United States. Imagine how great it would be if you could cycle from state to state
    > >-- or even across the country -- on pathways reserved for cyclists and other non-motorized
    > >vehicles. And all along the path, you would find wonderful places to eat, sleep and relax that
    > >catered to the needs of cyclists.
    >
    > My sympathies with all you've had to go through, and drastic changes to your life as result. It is
    > chilling to think as a fellow long distance cycle tourist and otherwise car-free rider, "that
    > could have been me..."
    >
    > I agree roadway design is part of a solution. However, I'm also not convinced that a complete
    > duplicate separate bike pathway network complete with signals at each crossing (such as in the
    > Netherlands) is practical on scale in USA.

    A 'complete duplicate separate bike pathway' is not what we are putting out for. While Andrew's
    vision will certainly describe some parts of the network we envision, as per
    NationalBicycleGreenway.com, under 'About NBG', you will see that:

    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    The National Bicycle Greenway is envisioned as a nationwide network of interconnected bike friendly
    roads and bicycle pathways that will connect cyclists to major cities throughout the US. The NBG is
    dedicated to developing a standard for cycle-safe thruways that enhances the travel experience of
    the transportational cyclist.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Sorry for the confusion....

    THX 4 U!!

    <snip>

    MARTIN KRIEG: "Awake Again" Author c/o BikeRoute.com 79 & 86 TransAms, nonprofit Nat. Bicycle
    Greenway CEO Ever wanted anything so bad U were willing to die for it? Really die? By moving thru
    clinical death and reversing paralysis, *I saw God* when I answered that question.
     
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