Ride with music or not?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Blue Gator, Jun 12, 2004.

  1. Alex88

    Alex88 Guest

    In rec.bicycles.misc, Blue Gator ha avuto il coraggio di scrivere:

    > I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides. Good
    > Idea or Bad Idea?


    i hate who listens music while driving, also a bike...
    if you go in a park, ok, but in other cases is a terrible thing...

    bye bye
    --
    Alex88(16,RM,60±,70±,Full-Suspended munito, Biker)
    [email protected] - rimuovi NOSPAMM
    www.alex88.3000.it
     


  2. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    David Reuteler wrote:
    :: Roger Zoul <[email protected]> wrote:
    ::::: part of what kept them from becoming popular (ironically enuf) was
    ::::: the sound quality .. they use a lossy compression. the reason
    ::::: that's ironic is that they were completely annihiliated in the
    ::::: marketplace by mp3 players. ha ha ha.
    :::
    ::: Not all lossy compression is created equal....
    ::
    :: well, that's true. and the lossy compression used on minidisc
    :: players is in general *BETTER* than what's used on mp3 players (mp3s
    :: compress smaller for a given compression ratio, but atracs sound
    :: better). that's kind of moot anyway because early minidiscs were
    :: 4:1 and most mp3s are on the order of 8:1 or 10:1 which clearly
    :: sound worse.

    With Mp3s nowadays you can set compression levels....I think minidisc
    players were just ahead of their time...I have no idea how they sound...

    ::
    ::: My iPod has a 30 GB HD in it and can last for at least 6 hours
    ::: (I've never listened to it that long and would never take it on a
    ::: bike ride).
    ::
    :: i have the same ipod, btw. pretty hard to charge that in the tent,
    :: tho. well, unless you have a generator. which was my point ..
    :: battery powered is nice while touring.

    And a good one....even though, I do think the make device that will let you
    charge your iPod from a battery...I remember wondering....why would someone
    want that....now I see at least one good reason (okay, Mp3s will riding is
    NOT a good reason, IMO -- that's my story and I'm sticking to it!) :)
     
  3. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Gooserider wrote:
    >
    > "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Blue Gator wrote:
    > > :: This has probably been discussed before, but please forgive me for
    > > :: asking since I'm new to the group.
    > > ::
    > > :: I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides.
    > > :: Good Idea or Bad Idea?
    > >
    > > IMO, a very bad idea. You need to listen for approaching cars, or at
    > > least I do.

    >
    > Some people advocate using an earplug in the right ear, as to leave the left
    > ear for traffic sounds. I don't know how well that would work. I don't ride
    > with music either, preferring to listen to the sounds of nature. :)


    The one-ear thing works fine, especially if you have a 'mono' switch on
    your device. There's no problem at all in hearing cars. Nature? Yeah,
    right. Well, I guess it's possible during traffic lulls...

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    =====================================================
    It's 95% of the lawyers making the other 5% look bad.
     
  4. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    maxo wrote:
    >
    > On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 17:50:18 +0000, R15757 wrote:
    >
    > > Double standard if ever there was one.

    >
    > not really, you'd have to have your stereo in the car at a pretty painful
    > volume to equal the immersion effect caused by headphones. Around here,
    > cops pull over such cars...


    In a well-sealed car with the AC on (my mom's 88 Caddy, she feels
    uncomfortable with the windows open) you can't hear ambulances and
    firetrucks before you see them even with the radio off. Riding with one
    earbud detracts in no way from hearing traffic with the other ear. I
    preferred some kind of talk (NPR was about the only thing I could get
    reliably in the hills) -- listening to music isn't enough to make me
    forget the fact that I'm climbing this miserable hill for the
    two-thousandth time and it's no easier than the two-hundredth time :-(

    --
    Cheers,
    Bev
    =====================================================
    It's 95% of the lawyers making the other 5% look bad.
     
  5. On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 14:38:30 -0400, Badger_South <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >How do you get the musics on the minidisc players? I dimly recall that it's
    >a problem getting the MP3 from the PC to the mini-disc; or maybe there's
    >some other hang up that kept them from becoming more popular


    RIght. At least in Sony's case, their miserable "software" is more
    about protecting copyrights than providing you a way to listen to the
    music you paid for.

    And if you record something of your own (meaning your own live music,
    for example) onto minidisc you CANNOT transfer the digital files to
    your PC. You can transfer music from a minidisc to a PC only by
    analog means in Sony's world.

    For portable tunes stick to MP3 players.
     
  6. tomgaul

    tomgaul Guest

    Blue Gator wrote:
    > This has probably been discussed before, but please forgive me for
    > asking since I'm new to the group.
    > I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides. Good
    > Idea or Bad Idea?
    > --
    > Arlie C.




    I use a small mp3 with open air type individual head set, each clips on
    to each ear, and it runs on a single aaa battery and I can get about 10-
    12 hours per battery. It stores about 60 songs with a extra memory card
    installed. I couldn't ride with out it unless I'm riding with a group.



    --
     
  7. Alex88

    Alex88 Guest

    In rec.bicycles.misc, Gooserider ha avuto il coraggio di scrivere:

    > Some people advocate using an earplug in the right ear, as to leave the left
    > ear for traffic sounds. I don't know how well that would work. I don't ride
    > with music either, preferring to listen to the sounds of nature. :)


    or the sounds of good cars (porsche, ferrari, lamborghini and so on...)
    or the sound of a suzuki RR 600

    bye


    --
    Alex88
    "Aio te, Aeacida, Romanos vincere posse"
    O Eacide, credo che i Romani ti possano vincere.
    O Eacide, credo che tu possa vincere i Romani.
     
  8. K-Man

    K-Man Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s01>,
    "Blue Gator" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This has probably been discussed before, but please forgive me for asking
    > since I'm new to the group.
    >
    > I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides. Good
    > Idea or Bad Idea?


    It could be a good or bad idea, depending on exactly what you do. If you
    use the right kind of earphones, are listening to the right kind of
    music, and doing it at an appropriate volume, you should be fine.

    Earphones - I use the earbuds that came with my iPod. They rest loosely
    in my earlobe, and allow a good bit of ambient noise so I can hear
    what's going on around me. NEVER wear headphones that actually insert
    into the ear canal when riding. These things sound great, and I love the
    pair I have, but they block out too much ambient noise. NEVER wear
    headphones that cover your ears either, for the same reason.

    Music - I generally listen to classical, electronic, or new age when I'm
    riding. My favorite type of music is progressive rock, but that's
    generally too loud to safely listen to while riding. I like Heavy Metal
    too, but that's right out. And for some reason I just don't find rock of
    any kind conducive to cycling.

    Volume - Whatever you're listening to, keep the volume at a level that
    you can hear road and other ambient noise.

    HTH,

    Ken
     
  9. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 06:22:48 GMT, "Blue Gator"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides. Good
    >Idea or Bad Idea?


    Get a small, cheap, rugged one with a speaker sufficiently loud to
    be heard from wherever you lash it to the bike. Does such a beast
    exist?

    I use a $5 radio from Wal Mart. I thought it required headphones,
    and struggled to mount them close enough to hear but far enough not
    to block my hearing (and be a law violation); then, one day,
    accidentally, the plug came loose and the thing was blaring out it's
    speaker. I had no idea it had the speaker when I bought it...
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  10. My two cents worth - headphones are a very bad idea for all
    the reasons already stated.

    As others have mentioned, if you want to listen to music, use
    a device with an external speaker at a moderate level so you
    can still hear all the traffic sounds.

    I sometimes listen to music while riding alone on country
    roads. I just throw a radio in my handlebar bag. I did find
    that I needed one large enough to generate sufficient volume
    to hear well, and that a digital display with a frequency lock
    was helpful in preventing station drift due to the vibrations
    from the bike.

    Alan

    (remove the x's from email address)


    > I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on
    > long rides. Good Idea or Bad Idea?
    >
     
  11. TomP

    TomP Guest

    Roger Zoul wrote:

    > Blue Gator wrote:
    > :: This has probably been discussed before, but please forgive me for
    > :: asking since I'm new to the group.
    > ::
    > :: I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides.
    > :: Good Idea or Bad Idea?
    >
    > IMO, a very bad idea. You need to listen for approaching cars, or at least
    > I do.


    So what are hearing impaired riders to do?


    --
    Tp,

    -------- __o
    ----- -\<. -------- __o
    --- ( )/ ( ) ---- -\<.
    -------------------- ( )/ ( )
    -----------------------------------------

    No Lawsuit Ever Fixed A Moron...
     
  12. On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 06:22:48 +0000, Blue Gator wrote:

    > I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides. Good
    > Idea or Bad Idea?


    Terrible idea. You need to be able to hear what is going on around you.
    Yes, hearing-impaired cyclists can ride safely, but they make allowances
    for that which those with normal hearing are not accustomed to.

    Besides, you are out there to enjoy the experience. Why blot it out?

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a
    _`\(,_ | conclusion. -- George Bernard Shaw
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  13. On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 22:57:56 +0000, TomP wrote:

    > So what are hearing impaired riders to do?


    They are aware of the possibility of people coming up on them without
    their being able to hear, so they look around more than do riders with
    average hearing. They are also not engrossed with the music.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | ...nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or
    _`\(,_ | property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person
    (_)/ (_) | within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. --
    Fourteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution.
     
  14. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 22:57:56 +0000, TomP wrote:
    >
    >> So what are hearing impaired riders to do?

    >
    > They are aware of the possibility of people coming up on them without
    > their being able to hear, so they look around more than do riders with
    > average hearing. They are also not engrossed with the music.


    I can hear with good acuity, but my hearing isn't very directional.
    So I can hear if something is 'there'; I just can't tell where
    'there' is, by hearing alone.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  15. David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Besides, you are out there to enjoy the experience. Why blot it out?


    you, uh, don't have a very positive view of music do you? for me music will
    often enhance and add to an experience .. its safety is obviously a separate
    issue.
    --
    david reuteler
    [email protected]
     
  16. amh

    amh Guest

    "Blue Gator" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s01>...
    > This has probably been discussed before, but please forgive me for asking
    > since I'm new to the group.
    >
    > I'm thinking about getting a mp3 player to listen to on long rides. Good
    > Idea or Bad Idea?



    I get clogged ears every so often and it reduces hearing in my ears.
    When it happens in my right ear it makes riding a daunting occasion. I
    live and ride on Long Island, NY and couldn't imagine going out for a
    ride without the ability to hear traffic or other road noises. On
    yesterday's ride I was overtaken by a group of 20 or so other riders.
    They were going past me before I heard the first one say "Bike up". I
    just about jumped out of my shorts when they flew by.

    In my bike environment it would be a very bad idea for me. Your
    mileage may vary.

    Andy
     
  17. TomP

    TomP Guest

    "David L. Johnson" wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 22:57:56 +0000, TomP wrote:
    >
    > > So what are hearing impaired riders to do?

    >
    > They are aware of the possibility of people coming up on them without
    > their being able to hear, so they look around more than do riders with
    > average hearing. They are also not engrossed with the music.
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson


    David,
    I can hear approaching traffic just fine with earbud type headphones,
    with the volume loud enough to hear the programming over the ambient wind
    noise. I might even go so far as to say I can hear approaching traffic
    better with the earbuds in place. Depending on ambient conditions, wind
    speed and direction.
    Use a little judgment and accept the risk.



    --
    Tp,

    -------- __o
    ----- -\<. -------- __o
    --- ( )/ ( ) ---- -\<.
    -------------------- ( )/ ( )
    -----------------------------------------

    No Lawsuit Ever Fixed A Moron...
    Life is one big Risk Management exercise.
     
  18. Fred Hall

    Fred Hall Guest

    In New York State headphones/earbuds used in both ears are against traffic
    regulations...

    Section 375 (24-a). It shall be unlawful to operate upon any public highway
    in this state a motor vehicle, limited use automobile, limited use
    motorcycle or bicycle while the operator is wearing more than one earphone
    attached to a radio, tape player or other audio device.

    "TomP" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "David L. Johnson" wrote:
    >
    > > On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 22:57:56 +0000, TomP wrote:
    > >
    > > > So what are hearing impaired riders to do?

    > >
    > > They are aware of the possibility of people coming up on them without
    > > their being able to hear, so they look around more than do riders with
    > > average hearing. They are also not engrossed with the music.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > David L. Johnson

    >
    > David,
    > I can hear approaching traffic just fine with earbud type

    headphones,
    > with the volume loud enough to hear the programming over the ambient wind
    > noise. I might even go so far as to say I can hear approaching traffic
    > better with the earbuds in place. Depending on ambient conditions, wind
    > speed and direction.
    > Use a little judgment and accept the risk.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Tp,
    >
    > -------- __o
    > ----- -\<. -------- __o
    > --- ( )/ ( ) ---- -\<.
    > -------------------- ( )/ ( )
    > -----------------------------------------
    >
    > No Lawsuit Ever Fixed A Moron...
    > Life is one big Risk Management exercise.
    >
     
  19. On Sat, 03 Jul 2004 14:39:41 +0000, TomP wrote:

    > noise. I might even go so far as to say I can hear approaching traffic
    > better with the earbuds in place. Depending on ambient conditions, wind
    > speed and direction.


    Then how come no one on the bike trails, walker, runner, or rider, seems
    to hear me when I call out "I'm passing on your left" if they have
    headphones on?

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Let's not escape into mathematics. Let's stay with reality. --
    _`\(,_ | Michael Crichton
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  20. SoCalMike

    SoCalMike Guest

    David L. Johnson wrote:

    > On Sat, 03 Jul 2004 14:39:41 +0000, TomP wrote:
    >
    >
    >>noise. I might even go so far as to say I can hear approaching traffic
    >>better with the earbuds in place. Depending on ambient conditions, wind
    >>speed and direction.

    >
    >
    > Then how come no one on the bike trails, walker, runner, or rider, seems
    > to hear me when I call out "I'm passing on your left" if they have
    > headphones on?



    they always hear me. maybe because the volume thru my sony earbuds is so
    loud i cant hear myself yelling :)

    seriously, i *always* follow the rules of the trail, and stay on my
    right. noone should have to tell me theyre passing on my left- they
    should just do it.

    most people are ok about the rules, but it seems like the ones that
    arent are

    a)families- kids weaving all over the place

    b)boyfriend/girlfriend... the girl aways have to ride next to the guy

    c)testosterone-fueled packs of weenie armed lycra clad bikers
     
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