Riding a century

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bob M, Sep 12, 2003.

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  1. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because my ride this Sunday is
    100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles instead of the 100km. My
    long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45 miles (two weeks ago)... I
    only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a day. Is this enough riding to
    ride 100 miles?

    Thanks.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Bob M <[email protected]> wrote in news:eek:[email protected]:
    > How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because my ride this Sunday is
    > 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles instead of the 100km.
    > My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45 miles (two weeks
    > ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a day. Is this
    > enough riding to ride 100 miles?

    How hilly is the 100 miles? Most of the centuries around where I live have 6000 feet or more of
    climbing, which could make them difficult for someone doing 50 mile rides with much less climbing.
    If the century is flat, you should have no problem if you pace yourself.
     
  3. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    I've done centuries accidentally just running diverse errands. A couple of 25-mile distant round
    trips and there you are. It still takes a while though.

    Numb butt or hands is the most likely indicator of having done one by mistake.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  4. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 18:02:10 +0000 (UTC), Ken <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Bob M <[email protected]> wrote in news:eek:[email protected]:
    >> How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because my ride this Sunday is
    >> 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles instead of the 100km.
    >> My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45 miles (two weeks
    >> ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a day. Is this
    >> enough riding to ride 100 miles?
    >
    > How hilly is the 100 miles? Most of the centuries around where I live have 6000 feet or more of
    > climbing, which could make them difficult for someone doing 50 mile rides with much less climbing.
    > If the century is flat, you should have no problem if you pace yourself.
    >

    Good question. Unfortunately, I don't know. There's no route posted. I ride in a hilly area, in fact
    my ride is pretty much all hills. I do know that we're starting on the coast of CT, so unless the
    route is along the coast, there's going to be hills.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  5. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 17:59:21 GMT, Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because my ride this Sunday is
    > 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles instead of the 100km.
    > My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45 miles (two weeks
    > ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a day. Is this
    > enough riding to ride 100 miles?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >

    Well, I've found out that the 100km ride is about 56 miles, with 4,900 feet of climbing, while the
    100 mile ride is about 92 miles with 7,400 feet of climbing. I rode 55 miles last week, but I don't
    know how much climbing there was, although there's a lot. So, I'll probably stick to the 56 miles,
    especially if it rains.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  6. Bgaudet0801

    Bgaudet0801 Guest

    "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because
    my
    > ride this Sunday is 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles
    > instead of the 100km. My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45
    > miles (two weeks ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a
    > day. Is this enough riding to ride 100 miles?

    Cetaris paribus I wouldn't consider going from 55 miles to 100 miles too much of a leap if you're
    comfortable at 55. [you're not completely exhausted and drained afterwards] But I'd still recommend
    you leave the day free for recuperation.

    --
    'Sell your sin Just cash in' -Jewell
     
  7. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 20:42:19 GMT, bgaudet0801 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    >> How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because
    > my
    >> ride this Sunday is 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles
    >> instead of the 100km. My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before),
    >> 45 miles (two weeks ago) ... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20
    >> miles a day. Is this enough riding to ride 100 miles?
    >
    > Cetaris paribus I wouldn't consider going from 55 miles to 100 miles too much of a leap if you're
    > comfortable at 55. [you're not completely exhausted and drained afterwards] But I'd still
    > recommend you leave the day free for recuperation.
    >
    > --
    > 'Sell your sin Just cash in' -Jewell
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks. I'm definitely thinking about the 100 miles, but it is (I found out) another 2,400 feet of
    climbing. If it rains (which it's supposed to -- as of today, but this is New England, and the
    forecast changes hourly), then I'll probably ride the 100km.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  8. On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 17:59:21 +0000, Bob M wrote:

    > How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because my ride this Sunday is
    > 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles instead of the 100km.
    > My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45 miles (two weeks
    ago)...

    If these represent high-water marks for you, then I would be uncomfortable recommending that you
    ride a century. I'd like to see you have some 75+ mile rides in your legs first.

    If, though, the ride is fairly flat you might be OK. Your butt will be sore, as will your hands, but
    you will be OK. If, on the other hand, it is quite hilly, you should consider seriously whether or
    not this would be fun for you.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | We have a record of conquest, colonization and expansion _`\(,_ | unequalled by any people
    in the Nineteenth Century. We are not (_)/ (_) | to be curbed now. --Henry Cabot Lodge, 1895
     
  9. Harris

    Harris Guest

    "Bob M" wrote:

    > How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because
    my
    > ride this Sunday is 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles
    > instead of the 100km. My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45
    > miles (two weeks ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a
    > day. Is this enough riding to ride 100 miles?

    You might be able to complete it, but I doubt you would enjoy it. How did you feel at the end of the
    50 miler? Could you have done it again when you got to the end?

    Generally, you want to do several rides of >50 miles, and at least one around 75-80 miles before
    attempting a century.

    It seems to me that 100k (62 miles) would be the perfect ride for you at this point. Then maybe 75
    miles the following weekend, and THEN 100 miles the weekend after that.

    Good luck, Art Harris
     
  10. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because
    my
    > ride this Sunday is 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles
    > instead of the 100km. My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45
    > miles (two weeks ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a
    > day. Is this enough riding to ride 100 miles?

    Bob,

    My training regimen for my first almost double century (100 miles day one, 75 day two, mostly flat
    day one, rolling hills day two) was three months of one fast 30 miler every weekend added to my
    normal daily commute. Keep in mind that I had been commuting for several years by this point and was
    in good shape overall. The point is that you can probably handle it if you are in decent shape.

    Good Luck, Buck
     
  11. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 21:33:03 GMT, Harris <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Bob M" wrote:
    >
    >> How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because
    > my
    >> ride this Sunday is 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles
    >> instead of the 100km. My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before),
    >> 45 miles (two weeks ago) ... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20
    >> miles a day. Is this enough riding to ride 100 miles?
    >
    > You might be able to complete it, but I doubt you would enjoy it. How did you feel at the end of
    > the 50 miler? Could you have done it again when you got to the end?
    >
    > Generally, you want to do several rides of >50 miles, and at least one around 75-80 miles before
    > attempting a century.
    >
    > It seems to me that 100k (62 miles) would be the perfect ride for you at this point. Then maybe 75
    > miles the following weekend, and THEN 100 miles the weekend after that.
    >
    > Good luck, Art Harris
    >
    >
    >

    Thanks, that was what I was aiming for -- I have a 100km this weekend, then a ride that's 55
    Saturday and 60 Sunday, then I was thinking one more longer ride, then a century. The only problem
    is that the centuries are basically over in New England in September. So, I'll have to ride one
    myself (which isn't bad, but it's nice to have support and bathrooms).

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  12. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 17:59:21 GMT, Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:
    > about 20 miles a day. Is this enough riding to ride 100 miles?

    How old are you, what's your condition, and how does the hill-density of your normal ride compare
    with that of your possible 100 miler?

    I see you're from connecticut. Got any flat centuries? I'd like to do my first...

    I rode 30 miles one weekend, didn't ride all week, then rode 65 miles the next (then I didn't ride
    for a few weeks, so I blew that). I'm 23, so it's easier to ramp up sharply than if I was, for
    example, 53.

    > Thanks.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  13. Bgaudet0801

    Bgaudet0801 Guest

    "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 20:42:19 GMT, bgaudet0801 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "Bob M" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:eek:[email protected]...
    > >> How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask
    because
    > > my
    > >> ride this Sunday is 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles
    > >> instead of the 100km. My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before),
    > >> 45 miles (two weeks ago) ... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20
    > >> miles
    a
    > >> day. Is this enough riding to ride 100 miles?
    > >
    > > Cetaris paribus I wouldn't consider going from 55 miles to 100 miles too much of a leap if
    > > you're comfortable at 55. [you're not completely exhausted and drained afterwards] But I'd still
    > > recommend you leave the day free for recuperation.
    ^
    (next)

    > Thanks.

    Your welcome, for what it's worth. When I did my Bolton loop earlier this summer, it took
    everything I had and I felt it afterwards, but for me the sense of accomplishment is worth it.

    --
    'Sell your sin Just cash in' -Jewell
     
  14. > Thanks, that was what I was aiming for -- I have a 100km this weekend,
    then
    > a ride that's 55 Saturday and 60 Sunday, then I was thinking one more longer ride, then a century.
    > The only problem is that the centuries are basically over in New England in September. So, I'll
    > have to ride one myself (which isn't bad, but it's nice to have support and bathrooms).

    And now for a dissenting opinion...

    In general, I find that people are able to easily ride maybe 30% over what they're used to on a
    reasonably-well-supported and popular (meaning lots of riders) century. Much of physical effort is
    actually mental, and the fun/euphoria of riding with a whole lot of other people, and not having to
    worry about running out of food & water etc., makes the miles pass by a whole lot more quickly and
    enjoyably. Your mileage may vary, but as a general guideline, an organized century is not the worst
    place to try and stretch your reach a bit.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  15. Alfred Klek

    Alfred Klek Guest

    > Good question. Unfortunately, I don't know. There's no route posted. I ride in a hilly area, in
    > fact my ride is pretty much all hills. I do know that we're starting on the coast of CT, so unless
    > the route is along the coast, there's going to be hills.
    >
    > --
    > Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply

    Hey hey, i'm from CT. well, the coast is flat as is much of the central section of the state, as you
    go north anywheres else there are hills. since CT is pretty small, it's going to be pretty hard to
    make a flat century. The good part is that it's pretty hard to ride 100 miles in CT without it being
    beautiful for most of it. there's a few ugly cities but proportionally more pretty stuff especially
    in the northern corners (i used to live in Mansfield in the "quiet corner" very pretty and nice
    riding). Where are you riding? Where are you from? there's a good chance you already are used to the
    extremes of CT topographyif you're from here, it's pretty consistant once you get about 10 miles
    from the shore. just as an offhand estimate you're probably looking at rolling hills maxing out in
    the north at maybe 200 ft. vertical displacement and pretty steep. The hardest thing i've found
    about riding long distances in those hills is that they just keep coming, one after another forever
    and ever. as always the fight is mental, not physical. slap it in a low gear and spin up to the top
    if you have to and take them in stride. best of luck Alfred
     
  16. H. M. Leary

    H. M. Leary Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 17:59:21 GMT, Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because my ride this Sunday is
    > > 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles instead of the 100km.
    > > My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45 miles (two weeks
    > > ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a day. Is this
    > > enough riding to ride 100 miles?
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    >
    > Well, I've found out that the 100km ride is about 56 miles, with 4,900 feet of climbing, while the
    > 100 mile ride is about 92 miles with 7,400 feet of climbing. I rode 55 miles last week, but I
    > don't know how much climbing there was, although there's a lot. So, I'll probably stick to the 56
    > miles, especially if it rains.

    Picking nits:

    100km = 62.093 miles 100miles = a century, not 92miles

    Enjoy the ride.

    Has anyone seen my Gore-Tex socks???

    HAND

    --
    ³Freedom Is a Light for Which Many Have Died in Darkness³

    - Tomb of the unknown - American Revolution
     
  17. JC Henry

    JC Henry New Member

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    Did my first century yesterday. It was a very flat paved trail (converted train "rail" track), but I did it on a fat tire offroad bike. My previous best distance wise was 60 miles. I read somewhere it's best to a 80 mile run before going to 100 but after 80 I could start to smell the 100 so I just bit it and did the last 20.
     
  18. Dan Cosley

    Dan Cosley Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, JC Henry wrote:
    > Did my first century yesterday. It was a very flat paved trail (converted train "rail" track), but
    > I did it on a fat tire offroad bike. My previous best distance wise was 60 miles. I read somewhere
    > it's best to a 80 mile run before going to 100 but after 80 I could start to smell the 100 so I
    > just bit it and did the last 20.

    So the big question: how do you feel today?

    -- Dan

    --
    Dan Cosley ([email protected] * http://www.cs.umn.edu/~cosley/) GroupLens Research
    Lab, Univ of MN (http://movielens.umn.edu/ * 612.624.8372) *** Just a foot soldier in the Army
    of Truth ***
     
  19. Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 05:08:09 -0700 (PDT), Steve McDonald <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Best to slip by them silently, so they can't react until you're past.
    >
    >Well, while this was posted in a very...strong way, it works rather well.
    >
    >I sometimes say "On your left", "Passing on your left", or nothing at all; they are all about
    >equally effective. If I could guess which would be effective on which person...
    >
    >The quiet pass works because either they don't know and don't react until it's too late to cause a
    >problem, or they do know and act properly.

    I generally agree. One 1.5 mile path I use is frequented by lots of bikes and walkers. Walkers and
    stollers seem to like it because it is along a stream, much of it is thru woods and has a park at
    the midpoint. It attracts lots of bikes because it has shopping districts at either end, leads to
    the only alternate access across an interstate aside from overpasses, goes under a very busy parkway
    and provides an N-S route alternative to 3 very busy streets.

    The seasoned walkers, of all ages, do walk on the right and leave plenty of passing room. On the one
    hand, I've noticed the elderly cringe a bit when I call anything out, it is probably a natural
    suprise reaction but looks like they are bracing for impact. Some even scrunch in as if my call was
    a request for more room (it wasnt, I was just giving notice of my existance). The quiet pass would
    work here because they do leave room, the question is which is more jarring for them.

    On the other hand, a dog walker was well to the right once, and his canine was off the path to the
    right sniffing along. The path was a bit narrow but I had plenty of room so I executed a quiet pass
    on the grass to the left. The sound of my tires hitting the grass startled even the dog (it was
    windy as I recall).

    This is one of the seminal incidents which got me to thinking about this whole question. A different
    dog could have reacted differently and agressively, perhaps even getting loose from the human who
    was unprepared/unaware.

    So, it seems situational to me. With those who are taking the entire width and you wish them to
    yield some, most dog walkers and those with kids, a call seems in order. Less so with walkers and
    strollers you see regularly and those well to the right and whom you can pass safely.

    >"Passing on your left" makes sense, but it's such a long phrase, you have to be going the same
    >speed as them for them to hear it; otherwise, you have to start saying it when you're far away, and
    >they only hear "ss n blphf".
    >
    >"On your left" is shorter but confusing for some.

    It shouldnt be. In countries where you drive on the right and pass on the left, it should be
    somewhat intuitive. I mean why should each passing situation have to be reassessed and new rules and
    reactions evaluated and devised just because you are not in a car? Even the moving walkways in
    airports work that way (stand left, walk right).

    I might try "bike" in cases where you just want to let them know and "passing" or "passing left" in
    cases where I need them to yield some room.
     
  20. Coal Porter

    Coal Porter Guest

    On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 18:11:40 GMT, Bob M <[email protected]> wrote:

    |On Fri, 12 Sep 2003 18:02:10 +0000 (UTC), Ken <[email protected]> wrote:
    |
    |> Bob M <[email protected]> wrote in news:eek:[email protected]:
    |>> How far do people generally ride before riding a century? I ask because my ride this Sunday is
    |>> 100km, but I can also ride 100 miles. I'm thinking of riding the 100 miles instead of the 100km.
    |>> My long rides have been 55 miles (last week), 50 miles (the week before), 45 miles (two weeks
    |>> ago)... I only ride about 4 days a week, the other 3 days being about 20 miles a day. Is this
    |>> enough riding to ride 100 miles?
    |>
    |> How hilly is the 100 miles? Most of the centuries around where I live have 6000 feet or more of
    |> climbing, which could make them difficult for someone doing 50 mile rides with much less
    |> climbing. If the century is flat, you should have no problem if you pace yourself.
    |>
    |
    |Good question. Unfortunately, I don't know. There's no route posted. I |ride in a hilly area, in
    fact my ride is pretty much all hills. I do know |that we're starting on the coast of CT, so unless
    the route is along the |coast, there's going to be hills.

    You're riding in the Harvest Rides, aren't you? I did the markers for a segment of the route
    today. The 100k goes up into Bethel and comes back via 58, cuts in along the reserviors and back
    to the coast via Redding Rd. THe 100 miler adds a 30 mile or so section up into Wilton on 33 and
    then back down before doing the 100k thing into Bethel and back via 58 et al. Unfortunately you
    can't decide to do the 100 miler in-route because the segment that makes it longer is added at
    about the 8 mile point.

    I think you do enough miles to do the 100miler but frankly I'm concerned about the weather. It looks
    like it's going to rain some. Take both maps and see how warm it is. It's not bad if it's just
    drizzling but if it's a little chilly too, that's not a great combination.

    See how you feel. And good luck with the ride(even if it's not this one<g>).

    -c.porter.
     
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