riding, migraines and beta blockers



J

jamest

Guest
Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them
pretty well and can still go fast despite not getting my heartrate up
to where it would otherwise be. After being on and off them over recent
years, I do notice that I tend to get a migraine the day following a
hard ride while I'm taking them. Anyone else have any experiences to
share? I'm wondering if shifting the time I take a dose relative to my
ride time might help things.
 
P

Philip W. Moore, Jr.

Guest
"jamest" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them
> pretty well and can still go fast despite not getting my heartrate up
> to where it would otherwise be. After being on and off them over recent
> years, I do notice that I tend to get a migraine the day following a
> hard ride while I'm taking them. Anyone else have any experiences to
> share? I'm wondering if shifting the time I take a dose relative to my
> ride time might help things.
>


James,

This may be a dumb question, but are you sure your cycling migraines aren't
allergy related? That's what mine turned out to be.

-Philip
 
R

Roberto Divia

Guest
jamest wrote:
> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them
> pretty well and can still go fast despite not getting my heartrate up
> to where it would otherwise be. After being on and off them over recent
> years, I do notice that I tend to get a migraine the day following a
> hard ride while I'm taking them. Anyone else have any experiences to
> share?


Yes on both points for beta blockers. I am now on ACE inhibitors and things
go a bit better but I still occasionally get migraines after a hard ride.
At least the new therapy has a lesser impact on biking (beta blockers really
got me down).

Ciao,
--
Roberto Divia` Love at first sight is one of the greatest
Dep:pH Bat:53 Mailbox:C02110 labour-saving devices the world has ever seen
Route de Meyrin 385 ---------------------------------------------
Case Postale Phone: +41-22-767-4994
CH-1211 Geneve 23 CERN Fax: +41-22-767-9585
Switzerland E-Mail: [email protected]
 
R

Roberto Divia

Guest
jamest wrote:
> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them
> pretty well and can still go fast despite not getting my heartrate up
> to where it would otherwise be. After being on and off them over recent
> years, I do notice that I tend to get a migraine the day following a
> hard ride while I'm taking them. Anyone else have any experiences to
> share?


Yes on both points for beta blockers. I am now on ACE inhibitors and things
go a bit better but I still occasionally get migraines after a hard ride.
At least the new therapy has a lesser impact on biking (beta blockers really
got me down).

Ciao,
--
Roberto Divia` Love at first sight is one of the greatest
Dep:pH Bat:53 Mailbox:C02110 labour-saving devices the world has ever seen
Route de Meyrin 385 ---------------------------------------------
Case Postale Phone: +41-22-767-4994
CH-1211 Geneve 23 CERN Fax: +41-22-767-9585
Switzerland E-Mail: [email protected]
 
J

Juho Huttunen

Guest
jamest wrote:
> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them

[...]
> ride time might help things.


I tend to get mirgaines every now and then after a hard race or a long
training ride. I did consult a neurologist about that a while ago, but
he didn't think that beta blockers would be a good idea because they
tend to affect performance, as you know. I've learnt to avoid them by
making sure that my blood sugar level is as constant and stable as
possible. It doesn't always work and sometimes it's been a really
horrible car ride back home after a race. If you have any great ideas on
this, I sure would be grateful to hear about them.
 
H

h squared

Guest
Juho Huttunen wrote:


> It doesn't always work and sometimes it's been a really
> horrible car ride back home after a race. If you have any great ideas on
> this, I sure would be grateful to hear about them.



have you tried taking otc pain medication before a race, just in case
you do get a migraine after? (i don't know if this would help at all,
especially don't know how it would handle the "wonderful" migraine
nausea, but it seems worth a try :)

i get a migraine somewhere between twice a month to once every two
months, depending on how "lucky" i am. they're pretty horrible, but at a
low enough frequency that i'm not willing to take pills every day to
prevent them yet.

heather
 
C

Curtis L. Russell

Guest
On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 07:07:10 -0800, h squared
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Juho Huttunen wrote:
>
>
>> It doesn't always work and sometimes it's been a really
>> horrible car ride back home after a race. If you have any great ideas on
>> this, I sure would be grateful to hear about them.

>
>
>have you tried taking otc pain medication before a race, just in case
>you do get a migraine after? (i don't know if this would help at all,
>especially don't know how it would handle the "wonderful" migraine
>nausea, but it seems worth a try :)
>
>i get a migraine somewhere between twice a month to once every two
>months, depending on how "lucky" i am. they're pretty horrible, but at a
>low enough frequency that i'm not willing to take pills every day to
>prevent them yet.
>
>heather
>


It could be stress. I relieve mine by walking around and screaming at
mimes, "Speak up, goddammit!", then hitting them with my shillelagh.
It doesn't really get rid of the headache, but all the free drinks at
the bars help cover it up.

Curtis L. Russell
Odenton, MD (USA)
Just someone on two wheels...
 
M

Mark & Steven Bornfeld

Guest
Juho Huttunen wrote:

> jamest wrote:
>
>> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them

>
> [...]
>
>> ride time might help things.

>
>
> I tend to get mirgaines every now and then after a hard race or a long
> training ride. I did consult a neurologist about that a while ago, but
> he didn't think that beta blockers would be a good idea because they
> tend to affect performance, as you know. I've learnt to avoid them by
> making sure that my blood sugar level is as constant and stable as
> possible. It doesn't always work and sometimes it's been a really
> horrible car ride back home after a race. If you have any great ideas on
> this, I sure would be grateful to hear about them.


I used to get headaches after rides, esp. in the early season when my
fitness was poor. I don't know that they strictly qualified as
migraines, though they were usually one-sided and it felt like my
eyeball was gonna roll outta my head.
I concluded as you did, that it was a drop in blood sugar.

Steve

--
Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS
http://www.dentaltwins.com
Brooklyn, NY
718-258-5001
 
M

Me

Guest
On 11/22/05 9:27 PM, in article
[email protected], "Philip W. Moore, Jr."
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
> "jamest" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them
>> pretty well and can still go fast despite not getting my heartrate up
>> to where it would otherwise be. After being on and off them over recent
>> years, I do notice that I tend to get a migraine the day following a
>> hard ride while I'm taking them. Anyone else have any experiences to
>> share? I'm wondering if shifting the time I take a dose relative to my
>> ride time might help things.
>>

>
> James,
>
> This may be a dumb question, but are you sure your cycling migraines aren't
> allergy related? That's what mine turned out to be.
>
> -Philip
>
>



Philip,
You ARE a migraine
 
H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <BFAA4099.16CA27%[email protected]>, Me <[email protected]> wrote:

> On 11/22/05 9:27 PM, in article
> [email protected], "Philip W. Moore, Jr."
> <[email protected]> wrote:


> > James,
> >
> > This may be a dumb question, but are you sure your cycling migraines aren't
> > allergy related? That's what mine turned out to be.
> >
> > -Philip


> Philip,
> You ARE a migraine


I guess that makes you genital herpes.

--
tanx,
Howard

The sheriff is near...

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 
S

Steven L. Sheffield

Guest
On 11/22/2005 09:49 PM, in article
[email protected], "jamest"
<[email protected]> wrote:

> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them
> pretty well and can still go fast despite not getting my heartrate up
> to where it would otherwise be. After being on and off them over recent
> years, I do notice that I tend to get a migraine the day following a
> hard ride while I'm taking them. Anyone else have any experiences to
> share? I'm wondering if shifting the time I take a dose relative to my
> ride time might help things.




I take Neurontin on a daily basis (300 mg AM, 600 mg PM), and Relpax when I
start getting auras or feeling the throbbing behind my right eyeball.

No noticeable negative effect to my already miserable performance on the
bike.



--
Steven L. Sheffield
stevens at veloworks dot com
bellum pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est
ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea eye tee why you ti ay aitch
aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you
double-yew double-ewe dot veloworks dot com [foreword] slash
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Juho Huttunen <[email protected]> wrote:

> jamest wrote:
> > Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them

> [...]
> > ride time might help things.

>
> I tend to get mirgaines every now and then after a hard race or a long
> training ride. I did consult a neurologist about that a while ago, but
> he didn't think that beta blockers would be a good idea because they
> tend to affect performance, as you know. I've learnt to avoid them by
> making sure that my blood sugar level is as constant and stable as
> possible. It doesn't always work and sometimes it's been a really
> horrible car ride back home after a race. If you have any great ideas on
> this, I sure would be grateful to hear about them.



Not all head pain is migraine. A reliable diagnosis may be
indicated. The proximate cause of migraine is dilation of
blood vessel causing swelling of surrounding tissue
including nerve endings causing production of and
transmission to the brain of pain signals. The distal
cause or causes remain a mystery. Serotonin and a
particular serotonin receptor are theorized to be
involved.

--
Michael Press
 
K

Kurgan Gringioni

Guest
jamest wrote:
> Any other cyling migraineurs taking beta blockers? I tolerate them
> pretty well and can still go fast despite not getting my heartrate up
> to where it would otherwise be. After being on and off them over recent
> years, I do notice that I tend to get a migraine the day following a
> hard ride while I'm taking them. Anyone else have any experiences to
> share? I'm wondering if shifting the time I take a dose relative to my
> ride time might help things.





Dumbass -


Are you a Masters Fattie?

I tried to get a friend of mine to prescribe me beta blockers to help
with some public speaking anxiety and he wouldn't do it because my
blood pressure was too low.

It seems as if the only people who should use those things are couch
potatoes.


thanks,

K. Gringioni.
 
K

Kyle Legate

Guest
h squared wrote:
> Juho Huttunen wrote:
>
>
>> It doesn't always work and sometimes it's been a really
>> horrible car ride back home after a race. If you have any great ideas
>> on this, I sure would be grateful to hear about them.

>
>
>
> have you tried taking otc pain medication before a race, just in case
> you do get a migraine after? (i don't know if this would help at all,
> especially don't know how it would handle the "wonderful" migraine
> nausea, but it seems worth a try :)
>
> i get a migraine somewhere between twice a month to once every two
> months, depending on how "lucky" i am. they're pretty horrible, but at a
> low enough frequency that i'm not willing to take pills every day to
> prevent them yet.
>

I was like you, occassional migranes but not enough to seek medication.
I would get them a bit less frequently than you (except for one hellish
week where I gave a grad school seminar in the grip of a migrane (second
one in two days), and don't remember anything about it, but answered
questions and led a discussion successfully) but despite looking for a
trigger, I could never find one. Now that I live in Europe I don't get
them. Once I go home for Xmas I expect to encounter the prewarning sign
(I go blind except for peripheral vision for an hour before my head
explodes) to lie down within the first few days, as a "welcome back" sign.

I starting writing this message to give my two cents that no OTC
medication, or codeine, would have a dent on my migraines after they had
started, so I doubt that they would have an effect if taken before.
 
K

Kyle Legate

Guest
Mark & Steven Bornfeld wrote:
>
> I used to get headaches after rides, esp. in the early season when
> my fitness was poor. I don't know that they strictly qualified as
> migraines, though they were usually one-sided and it felt like my
> eyeball was gonna roll outta my head.
> I concluded as you did, that it was a drop in blood sugar.
>

I've had those too. They always happen after a long, hard ride that
stresses the fitness. I considered it was sugar, electrolyte and water
imbalance. They don't qualify as migraines.
 
E

Ewoud Dronkert

Guest
Kyle Legate wrote:
> Once I go home for Xmas I expect to encounter the prewarning sign
> (I go blind except for peripheral vision for an hour before my head
> explodes) to lie down within the first few days, as a "welcome back" sign.


Does it happen on visits to either side of the family?

--
E. Dronkert
 
K

Kyle Legate

Guest
Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
> Kyle Legate wrote:
>
>>Once I go home for Xmas I expect to encounter the prewarning sign
>>(I go blind except for peripheral vision for an hour before my head
>>explodes) to lie down within the first few days, as a "welcome back" sign.

>
>
> Does it happen on visits to either side of the family?
>

I'm the product of a broken home, so I only know one side of the family.
 
H

h squared

Guest
Kyle Legate wrote:
> Mark & Steven Bornfeld wrote:
>
>>
>> I used to get headaches after rides, esp. in the early season when
>> my fitness was poor. I don't know that they strictly qualified as
>> migraines, though they were usually one-sided and it felt like my
>> eyeball was gonna roll outta my head.
>> I concluded as you did, that it was a drop in blood sugar.
>>

> I've had those too. They always happen after a long, hard ride that
> stresses the fitness. I considered it was sugar, electrolyte and water
> imbalance. They don't qualify as migraines.


supposedly there are two types of migraines; classic and common. (pasted
snip following):

Migraines without Auras (Common Migraine)
Definition of Migraine Without Auras. To be defined as a migraine
without aura, a patient should have at least five attacks that have the
following characteristics:

A. Each untreated, or unsuccessfully treated, attack must last four to
73 hours.

B. It must have at least two of the following four qualities:

* Pain on one side of the head.

* Pulsing or throbbing pain.

* The pain must be severe enough to impair or prevent daily activities.

* The pain must be intensified by exertion, such as walking up stairs.

C. During a headache at least one of the following symptoms also be present:

* Nausea, vomiting or both.

* Sensitivity to light and noise.

Definition of Migraines with Auras. To be defined as a migraine with
aura, the patients must have at least two attacks that have three out of
four of the following events.

* One or more fully reversible aura symptom suggests to the
physician that they originate in the cerebral cortex or brain stem.

* At least one aura symptom develops gradually over more than four
minutes or two or more aura symptoms occur in succession.

* No single aura symptom lasts more than an hour. (There may be
successive aura symptoms, however, that extend that time, but each one
should not last more than 60 minutes.)

* The headache itself may begin before, at the same time, or at an
interval of no more than an hour after the hour.

more here:
http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articles/what_headache_000097_1.htm

common migraine heather
 
H

h squared

Guest
Kyle Legate wrote:

> I starting writing this message to give my two cents that no OTC
> medication, or codeine, would have a dent on my migraines after they had
> started, so I doubt that they would have an effect if taken before.


i think it may depend on the individual person and the severity of the
migraine whether they work or not. it sounds like you are definitely in
the "severe" category :( i'm afraid of developing rebound headaches, so
i rarely experiment with otc pain relievers, but this site claims that
some of them work for at least some migraineurs.
http://www.umm.edu/patiented/articl...edies_treating_a_migraine_attack_000097_7.htm

and to me codeine is a joke, i won't even accept a prescription for it.
i have no idea if it works on pain, because i'm so busy vomiting or
feeling sick to my stomach when i take it that i don't pay any attention
to anything else, so in a way, i *guess* it's effective, yay...

heather
 
P

Philip W. Moore, Jr.

Guest
"Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:BFAA4099.16CA27%[email protected]
> On 11/22/05 9:27 PM, in article


> Philip,
> You ARE a migraine
>


Me,

Thank you. As a lawyer, I've been called worse, albeit in person and not
anonymously.

-Philip