Riding on Road 2 Abreast



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J

Jason

Guest
Hi,

Am wondering if it's legal to ride 2 abreast on single lane roads? Eg. 2 bikes side by side. Thanks.

Cheers, Jason
 

byron27

New Member
Oct 19, 2003
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Originally posted by Jason
Hi,

Am wondering if it's legal to ride 2 abreast on single lane roads? Eg. 2 bikes side by side. Thanks.

Cheers, Jason

in western australia, yes.
not sure about the rest of aus.
 
S

Sting

Guest
Hi Jason,

Here in Victoria, and I expect the rest of Australia, it is perfectly legal to ride 2 abreast on
public roads as follows;

Under the road rules, a cyclist must not ride alongside more than one other rider, unless:

a. the rider is overtaking other cyclists who may be cycling beside each other; or,
b. the rider is taking part in an on-road cycling event that has been approved by the Chief
Commissioner of Police.

If a cyclist is riding alongside another cyclist, the cyclist must not ride more than 1.5 metres
from the other cyclist.

<http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/vrne/vrninte.nsf/alldocs/1A9365777EC0EB45CA2
56B5F0003CDCC?OpenDocument&Area=[Cyclists]>

Sting>

"Jason" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> Hi,
>
> Am wondering if it's legal to ride 2 abreast on single lane roads? Eg. 2 bikes side by
> side. Thanks.
>
>
> Cheers, Jason
 

jazmo

New Member
Jan 19, 2004
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In any case, you should be sensible about using this rule.

If you're on a single lane road with a double line then it's best to ride in single file. Also, you should monitor the situation if you are going to ride 2 abreast on a single lane road. If you have a car coming up ahead and another from behind, you should also go single file as the car behind won't be able to overtake.

Just exercise common sense and show some good-will towards motorists in these circumstances. Although riding two abreast might be legal, it will ******** motorists in some cases.
 

Roadie_scum

New Member
Nov 14, 2003
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Originally posted by Sting
Hi Jason,

Here in Victoria, and I expect the rest of Australia, it is perfectly legal to ride 2 abreast on
public roads as follows;

Under the road rules, a cyclist must not ride alongside more than one other rider, unless:

a. the rider is overtaking other cyclists who may be cycling beside each other; or,
b. the rider is taking part in an on-road cycling event that has been approved by the Chief
Commissioner of Police.

If a cyclist is riding alongside another cyclist, the cyclist must not ride more than 1.5 metres
from the other cyclist.


OK, that's thoroughly confusing, but true. In English: You can ride two abreast, more if you're passing or racing/in an organised event w police permission. I thought you also couldn't ride two abreast where double white lines are marked on a single lane road. Anyone know about this?
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Tue, 27 Jan 2004 14:51:15 GMT
Roadie_scum <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
> OK, that's thoroughly confusing, but true. In English: You can ride two abreast, more if you're
> passing or racing/in an organised event w police permission. I thought you also couldn't ride two
> abreast where double white lines are marked on a single lane road. Anyone know about this?
>

It's not mentioned in any road rules I've seen.

You can search yourself on www.austlii.edu.au.

Zebee
 
R

Ray Peace

Guest
Greetings, Yes, it is legal and always has been, in the words of the law, `when safe to do so'. This
of course presents some problems, how do you know it is safe? I travel with a rear vision mirror
attached to my glasses and pull in when I see a car coming up. I wouldn't recommend trying to
enforce your end of the law on a city road in peak hour though. Regards,
RY>

Jason wrote:

>Hi,
>
>Am wondering if it's legal to ride 2 abreast on single lane roads? Eg. 2 bikes side by
>side. Thanks.
>
>
>Cheers, Jason
 

Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
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Originally posted by Jason
Hi,

Am wondering if it's legal to ride 2 abreast on single lane roads? Eg. 2 bikes side by side. Thanks.

Cheers, Jason

From Tasmanian Dept of Transport web site

http://www.transport.tas.gov.au/road/transport_tas/cycling_walking.html#New Road Rules

New Road Rules

As part of the new National Traffic Code, some new road rules will affect users of some alternative forms of transport. Important changes include:

Two abreast bicycling and horse riding in single traffic lanes;
Riding of wheeled recreational devices or wheeled toys, such as skateboards and rollerblades, on roads and footpaths.

As these were put into place to comply with national road rules I assume they apply to all Australian States and territories.


These are the changes which came into effect:

Two abreast bicycle riding is now legal on Tasmanian roads where it is safe to do so. (Hey hey, now we can hold up traffic forever!)

Cyclists must ride in bicycle lanes where these are provided on a roadway, unless it is impracticable to do so. (The only designated bicycle lane in Hobart, near Taroona is worse than useless - full of stones, glass, potholes, parked cars and, in some places, is the gutter).

Bicycle riders in the far left-hand lane of a roundabout with two or more lanes must give way to any vehicle leaving the roundabout. (Wow it took some intelligence to dream that one up - I thought that's what everyone has to do).

P.S. Use of indicators on Tasmanian roads still appears to be optional, especially when turning left in front of a cyclist!!
 
B

Brian

Guest
The rule that everyone seems to ignore is that, yes, it is ok to ride two abreast, however in
doing so they must not obstruct vehicle traffic. This means that if you are two abreast and the
traffic behind cannot overtake because of you, the cops can take action if an irrate motorist
hasn't already.

BG

Sting wrote:
> Hi Jason,
>
> Here in Victoria, and I expect the rest of Australia, it is perfectly legal to ride 2 abreast on
> public roads as follows;
>
> Under the road rules, a cyclist must not ride alongside more than one other rider, unless:
>
>
> a. the rider is overtaking other cyclists who may be cycling beside each other; or,
> b. the rider is taking part in an on-road cycling event that has been approved by the Chief
> Commissioner of Police.
>
>
> If a cyclist is riding alongside another cyclist, the cyclist must not ride more than 1.5 metres
> from the other cyclist.
>
> <http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/vrne/vrninte.nsf/alldocs/1A9365777EC0EB45CA2
> 56B5F0003CDCC?OpenDocument&Area=[Cyclists]>
>
> Sting>
>
>
>
> "Jason" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>>Hi,
>>
>>Am wondering if it's legal to ride 2 abreast on single lane roads? Eg. 2 bikes side by
>>side. Thanks.
>>
>>
>>Cheers, Jason
>
 
S

Shane Stanley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Brian <[email protected]> wrote:

> The rule that everyone seems to ignore is that, yes, it is ok to ride two abreast, however in
> doing so they must not obstruct vehicle traffic. This means that if you are two abreast and the
> traffic behind cannot overtake because of you, the cops can take action if an irrate motorist
> hasn't already.

Which law is that? The relevant regulation on obstruction in Victoria is:

125. Unreasonably obstructing drivers or pedestrians
(126) A driver must not unreasonably obstruct the path of another driver or a pedestrian. Penalty: 2
penalty units. Note Driver includes a person in control of a vehicle--see the definition of
drive in the dictionary.
(127) For this rule, a driver does not unreasonably obstruct the path of another driver or a
pedestrian only because--
(a) the driver is stopped in traffic; or
(b) the driver is driving more slowly than other vehicles (unless the driver is driving abnormally
slowly in the circumstances). Example of a driver driving abnormally slowly A driver driving
at a speed of 20 kilometres per hour on a length of road to which a speed-limit of 80
kilometres per hour applies when there is no reason for the driver to drive at that speed on
the length of road.

-- Shane
 
R

Rickster

Guest
Brian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> The rule that everyone seems to ignore is that, yes, it is ok to ride two abreast, however in
> doing so they must not obstruct vehicle traffic. This means that if you are two abreast and the
> traffic behind cannot overtake because of you, the cops can take action if an irrate motorist
> hasn't already.
>

WTF ? I'm not aware of this rule. Can you give more info ?
 

Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
0
0
Originally posted by Brian
The rule that everyone seems to ignore is that, yes, it is ok to ride two abreast, however in
doing so they must not obstruct vehicle traffic. This means that if you are two abreast and the
traffic behind cannot overtake because of you, the cops can take action if an irrate motorist
hasn't already.

>

There is no such rule. It is L-A-W law that you are permitted to ride two abreast. It is common sense to allow vehicles to pass if they are building up behind you, but there is no compulsion to do so.

You can ride your bike in the middle of the lane and obstruct traffic if you consider it is unsafe to ride "as close to the left as practicable" which is the rule for all vehicles, not just bicycles. As one other thread poits out it would be unreasonable to obstruct traffic unduly on an 80kph speed limit zone, but again if there is a reasonable excuse for doing so then you would have a good defence if charged.

I find if you stick to the left, in some situations, vehicles will try to pass when there is not enough room to do so safely. Best to ride in the middle of the lane and remove the temptation to squeeze past. Of course, I always yield to the vehicles when the situation becomes safe and also indicate quite clearly when there is a clear road ahead and it is safe for them to pass.

On our group rides we ride two abreast most of the time as the bunch is moving along at between 40 and 50 kph in a 50 or 60 zone, so we are not holding up traffic too much. When we get to hills where we might slow down, we move to single file and clearly indicate to following vehicles when they should pass if they appear to be uncertain. A bit of friendly communication goes a long way.
 
A

Andrew Lighten

Guest
Spider1977 wrote:

> I find if you stick to the left, in some situations, vehicles will try to pass when there is not
> enough room to do so safely. Best to ride in the middle of the lane and remove the temptation to
> squeeze past. Of course, I always yield to the vehicles when the situation becomes safe and also
> indicate quite clearly when there is a clear road ahead and it is safe for them to pass.

Yep. I do exactly that on some of the mickey-mouse roundabouts where I live. When it's safe, move
into the middle of the lane as I approach the roundabout to stop anyone trying anything silly. Then,
on the exit, stay as far left as I can. I'll take the entry, and the cars can have the exit.
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on Thu, 29 Jan 2004 06:51:01 GMT
Spider1977 <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
> You can ride your bike in the middle of the lane and obstruct traffic if you consider it is unsafe
> to ride "as close to the left as practicable" which is the rule for all vehicles, not just
> bicycles. As one other

You aren't allowed to ride widely separated, if there's 2 of you, you can only be 1.5m apart. That's
about the only restriction.

from the Australian Road Rules:

151 Riding a motor bike or bicycle alongside more than 1 other rider

(1) The rider of a motor bike or bicycle must not ride on a road that is not a multi-lane road
alongside more than 1 other rider, unless subrule (3) applies to the rider. Offence provision.
Note Bicycle, motor bike and multi-lane road are defined in the dictionary, and rider is defined
in rule 17.

(2) The rider of a motor bike or bicycle must not ride in a marked lane alongside more than 1 other
rider in the marked lane, unless subrule (3) applies to the rider. Offence provision. Note
Marked lane is defined in the dictionary.

(3) The rider of a motor bike or bicycle may ride alongside more than 1 other rider if the rider is:
(a) overtaking the other riders; or
(b) permitted to do so under another law of this jurisdiction. Note Overtake is defined in the
dictionary.

(4) If the rider of a motor bike or bicycle is riding on a road that is not a multi-lane road
alongside another rider, or in a marked lane alongside another rider in the marked lane, the
rider must ride not over 1.5 metres from the other rider. Offence provision.

(5) In this rule: road does not include a road-related area, but includes a bicycle path, shared
path and any shoulder of the road. Note Bicycle path is defined in rule 239, road-related area
is defined in rule 13, shared path is defined in rule 242, and shoulder is defined in rule 12.`
 
K

K&C Russell

Guest
Thanks Brian,

I ****** myself reading that! What the hell are they going to do about peak hour traffic? Whoever
gets the job of writing tickets will get RSI, ALL the cars are obstructing traffic ;).

I am assuming that "obstructing vehicle traffic" would apply to all vehicles, bicycles thru to
trucks. I would like to see the section reference for that one.

Kevin

"Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> The rule that everyone seems to ignore is that, yes, it is ok to ride two abreast, however in
> doing so they must not obstruct vehicle traffic. This means that if you are two abreast and the
> traffic behind cannot overtake because of you, the cops can take action if an irrate motorist
> hasn't already.
>
> BG
>
> Sting wrote:
> > Hi Jason,
> >
> > Here in Victoria, and I expect the rest of Australia, it is perfectly
legal
> > to ride 2 abreast on public roads as follows;
> >
> > Under the road rules, a cyclist must not ride alongside more than one
other
> > rider, unless:
> >
> >
> > a. the rider is overtaking other cyclists who may be cycling beside
each
> > other; or,
> > b. the rider is taking part in an on-road cycling event that has been approved by the Chief
> > Commissioner of Police.
> >
> >
> > If a cyclist is riding alongside another cyclist, the cyclist must not
ride
> > more than 1.5 metres from the other cyclist.
> >
> >
<http://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/vrne/vrninte.nsf/alldocs/1A9365777EC0EB45CA2
> > 56B5F0003CDCC?OpenDocument&Area=[Cyclists]>
> >
> > Sting>
> >
> >
> >
> > "Jason" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> >
> >>Hi,
> >>
> >>Am wondering if it's legal to ride 2 abreast on single lane roads? Eg. 2 bikes side by side.
> >>Thanks.
> >>
> >>
> >>Cheers, Jason
> >
> >
 
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