Riding Twice A Day



jsirabella said:
As for riding twice a day, I did that but since I was waking up at 5am to get my first ride in and would not be able to start my second ride till 7pm..it was just too much as I was too tired having worked all day. Also I needed recovery...and my family was really starting to get ****** off at me. I found it did not work for me.
-js

people discount how important sleep is.. and not just going to bed, but sleep. you need time after your workout to wind down, get your HR down so you get really restful sleep. the more quality sleep you get the more you can get accomplished in your workout.. it's incredibly important and slipping in another workout at the cost of sleep can be counter productive.. i've found it to be more and more crucial the older i get... if i started getting up at 5 am i know i'd be crashing and burning in no time...

and i agree you need to find something that works with your schedule... the important stuff like family and work..
 
On a slightly side note,
How much time do you guys spend on SST level 4 work each week. It sounds to me that if your doing intensity to/from work every day you spend an awful lot of time going hard. Please include cat and hours/week in your reply thank you.
 
In Manhattan, going to and from work you can not really get any SST work in. I use my commute as a way to add a recovery ride as it takes me 45 minutes round trip. It helps the CTL more than you think as I get my SST work of 90-120 minutes and than add the commute for recovery.

Also I usually use my CX bike for the commute as really well built for NYC traffic and streets and sometimes will go through many of the dirt roads in CP which is alot of fun and good for the upper body also.

-js


Capisce said:
On a slightly side note,
How much time do you guys spend on SST level 4 work each week. It sounds to me that if your doing intensity to/from work every day you spend an awful lot of time going hard. Please include cat and hours/week in your reply thank you.
 
Powerful Pete said:
Expect not to finish the first few crits, do not get discouraged and eventually you will hang with the group and become competitive.

Well, as a new racer myself, I've only been in 7 races so far. I think that part of the reason I did finish my first few races, was actually because expected to do well. If you go out planning not to win, then I bet you won't. Most experienced racers will tell you (at least they told me) to have a plan for each race. Personally, whenever I plan for a race, my plan ends with me finishing first. Now realistically, you're probably not going to take first place or anything for your first crit, but if you expect to stay with the pack, I bet you'll have a better chance of staying with them, compared to how you'll finish if you expect to get dropped.
 
beison said:
Well, as a new racer myself, I've only been in 7 races so far. I think that part of the reason I did finish my first few races, was actually because expected to do well. If you go out planning not to win, then I bet you won't. Most experienced racers will tell you (at least they told me) to have a plan for each race. Personally, whenever I plan for a race, my plan ends with me finishing first. Now realistically, you're probably not going to take first place or anything for your first crit, but if you expect to stay with the pack, I bet you'll have a better chance of staying with them, compared to how you'll finish if you expect to get dropped.
Fair enough beison, you have a very good point. The fact is, you run into these types of threads every so often, so I see it as useful to point out that results in races do not come early. I feel it is important to point out that many (most?) riders will not do well in the initial few races in their career, and it is better to hang in there knowing that things will get better.

Having said that, congratulations on finishing your early races!
 
jsirabella said:
In Manhattan, going to and from work you can not really get any SST work in. I use my commute as a way to add a recovery ride as it takes me 45 minutes round trip. It helps the CTL more than you think as I get my SST work of 90-120 minutes and than add the commute for recovery.

Also I usually use my CX bike for the commute as really well built for NYC traffic and streets and sometimes will go through many of the dirt roads in CP which is alot of fun and good for the upper body also.

-js
JS, if you commute in Manhattan traffic on a regular basis, I say you've already got a giant leg up in crits as you've obviously conquered your fears of crashing and being hit. Seriously, the ability to manuever through schools of surging yellows cabs while not focusing on your eminent death should be a huge advantage when it comes to dicing for the inside line in the first turn. :)
 
dhk2 said:
JS, if you commute in Manhattan traffic on a regular basis, I say you've already got a giant leg up in crits as you've obviously conquered your fears of crashing and being hit. Seriously, the ability to manuever through schools of surging yellows cabs while not focusing on your eminent death should be a huge advantage when it comes to dicing for the inside line in the first turn. :)
Man oh man this is true! I live in chicago and commute through the loop, and it's crazy in there. The first crit I was in, it felt just like I was in traffic again--it gives you that aggression in your riding you need to make a move and force someone off the wheel you want, or take that inside line through a turn. You wanna become a ballsy rider, go up against taxi's every day and all of a sudden, getting in a wreck with another cyclist won't seem that bad... hehe
 
It depends on the day but there have been some days I decide to have some fun with the young gun messengers and their fixed gear bikes. I can usually get the best of them as the CX is good for the potholes so I just charge through them and never worry about crashing. Ever see a messenger race or bike polo? Those can be a bit crazy.

I was a messenger myself in what seems to be another lifetime but I really feel at home and prefer it when the streets are loaded and I begin to weave. After a while it becomes a bit of a zen thing as you just start to see a cab and know if this guy is a moron or not.

The funny part is that the pedestrians are the real horror. That is why I like fill streets as the people will stay on the sidewalk but even if I have the green, they will start just walking out in the street and crossing right in front of me. That is when you really need to learn how to weave and dodge.

During rush hour heading toward MSG or PENN, the people are like cattle and will not stop crossing until you push your way through! Lots of weave, accelerate, weave, accelerate...stop...dismount, remount quickly ... you get the idea.

-js


dhk2 said:
JS, if you commute in Manhattan traffic on a regular basis, I say you've already got a giant leg up in crits as you've obviously conquered your fears of crashing and being hit. Seriously, the ability to manuever through schools of surging yellows cabs while not focusing on your eminent death should be a huge advantage when it comes to dicing for the inside line in the first turn. :)
 

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