Right approach to dangerous driver behavior?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dan Cosley, Aug 12, 2003.

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  1. On Wed, 13 Aug 2003 04:18:00 GMT, "Doug Purdy" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Dan Cosley <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]: The guy stops his
    >> truck, reaches in the glove box, and pulls out a .45 The guy aims it at us and yells "You want
    >> some of this!!!???"
    >> ps. In all the excitement, we forgot to get the guys license plate number.
    >
    >Nice job. A description would have been a start. I wonder how many people he's shot since you all
    >decided not to bother reporting it.

    That would have made the perfect ending to the yarn.
     


  2. On Wed, 13 Aug 2003 15:36:28 GMT, Boyd Speerschneider <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >A big white truck F150 wiht tinted windows, a redneck driving it, and Bucs, confederate flag, and
    >Dale Ernheart "3" stickers on the back window.

    "Out of respect for the memory of Dale Earnhart, I have decided to completely eliminate all vision
    to the rear of my head. If I can't see it, it isn't happening".
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 12:19:15 GMT, Zippy the Pinhead <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> A big white truck F150 wiht tinted windows, a redneck driving it, and Bucs, confederate flag, and
    >> Dale Ernheart "3" stickers on the back window.
    >
    > "Out of respect for the memory of Dale Earnhart, I have decided to completely eliminate all vision
    > to the rear of my head. If I can't see it, it isn't happening".

    I've not seen a "3" that filled enough glass to substantially (let alone completely) eliminate rear
    vision. It does seem a bit bandwagony, however, to put a "3" on after the tragedy, when you had no
    "3" before, although not so bad an "in loving memory..." sticker.

    Further, the side mirrors on a pickup truck give a more than adequate view behind the truck, and to
    block the rear window completely is only a loss of convenience, not of safety or visibility.

    Smaller car mirrors adjusted to compensate for loss of rear window vision result in a terribly large
    blind spot, but not so most pickup mirrors.

    --
    Rick "Pickup Man" Onanian
     
  4. Coal Porter

    Coal Porter Guest

    On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 12:59:11 +0000 (UTC), Dan Cosley <[email protected]> wrote:

    |I've been having a larger-than-usual number of unpleasant-to- |potentially-dangerous encounters
    with motorists recently. This |involves verbal stuff, which usually I can shrug off. However, |it
    also sometimes involves being cut off or squeezed off the |road, and this I find harder to just let
    go. I'm trying to |train myself to get license/vehicle numbers rather than just |be scared, but:
    |
    |1) Is it worth getting license numbers of cars? Trucks?
    |2) What else (if anything) do you do about bad driver behavior?

    When you finish your "great" rides Do you remember the cars?

    I didn't. So I got to thinking that if they were bugging me, it wasn't them, it was me. I tried to
    concentrate more on the ride and over time, I've become a bit better cyclist and that makes it
    easier still to avoid running into anything I can't just dismiss and carry on<gr>. It's hard
    sometimes, ain't saying it's not. It doesn't hurt to recall that a lot more drivers try to be
    helpful than the few that make you shake your head.

    Good luck w the the attitude adj. -c.porter.
     
  5. Tomp

    Tomp Guest

    A disposable camera couldn't hurt either.

    Stergios Papadakis wrote:

    > Dan Cosley wrote:
    > >
    > > I've been having a larger-than-usual number of unpleasant-to- potentially-dangerous encounters
    > > with motorists recently. This involves verbal stuff, which usually I can shrug off. However,
    > > it also sometimes involves being cut off or squeezed off the road, and this I find harder to
    > > just let go. I'm trying to train myself to get license/vehicle numbers rather than just be
    > > scared, but:
    > >
    > > 1) Is it worth getting license numbers of cars? Trucks?
    > > 2) What else (if anything) do you do about bad driver behavior?
    > >
    > > -- Dan
    > >
    >
    > Today, I started carrying a little notebook in my jersey pocket on my commute. It is a "wet notes"
    > book, which is a coated paper that is waterproof. You can get it at marine stores. I started
    > carrying it because the same car leaned on the horn and gave me the finger for the fourth time
    > (six-lane road, light traffic, I was in the right half of the right lane). I will now have a dated
    > log of such occurences. If it ever does get serious, which I doubt, the log will be important.
    >
    > Today, I wrote down the first license plate number, a description of the car, and the driver's
    > actions. I've decided not to just shrug things off anymore, if I can tell people what they did
    > wrong, and why it is wrong, I will. If you address them by their license plate number, it has a
    > surprising calming effect. I bet that if you obviously write it down as well, it will be even
    > more effective. Unfortunately, this state doesn't require front license plates, so I can't
    > always do it.
    >
    > As far as having the larger-than-usual number of encounters lately, I find that I feel that way at
    > times, and it is probably just the statistics of small numbers. The events are rare anyway, only a
    > few times a year usually, so if I get a few in a month I notice. It is probably just chance.
    >
    > Stergios

    --

    Tp

    -------- __o ----- -\<. ------ __o --- ( ) / ( ) ---- -\<. ----------------- ( ) / ( )
    ---------------------------------------------

    Freedom is not free; Free men are not equal; Equal men are not free.
     
  6. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "TomP" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > A disposable camera couldn't hurt either.
    >

    I carried one of those in my handlebar bag during a weekend tour a few years ago. I had to bunnyhop
    an obstacle at speed (about 35mph) and the camera flew out of the bag, hit the pavement, then slid
    about 40 feet before exiting into the ditch. I retrieved it and other than a few scratches, it
    survived quite well. The pictures even turned out nice!

    -Buck
     
  7. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote:

    > "TomP" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> A disposable camera couldn't hurt either.
    >>
    >
    > I carried one of those in my handlebar bag during a weekend tour a few years ago. I had to
    > bunnyhop an obstacle at speed (about 35mph) and the camera flew out of the bag, hit the pavement,
    > then slid about 40 feet before exiting into the ditch. I retrieved it and other than a few
    > scratches, it survived quite well. The pictures even turned out nice!

    How long do people carry the same camera around? I would think that a year or two in a saddle bag
    would ruin the film, even if the dirt etc. hadn't ruined the camera. I suppose if you get
    harassed frequently that wouldn't be a problem. For that matter, it probably doesn't really need
    to work, except the flash. If people think you've just taken their picture, they'll likely behave
    for a while.

    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)
     
  8. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "Ray Heindl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote:
    >
    > > "TomP" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> A disposable camera couldn't hurt either.
    > >>
    > >
    > > I carried one of those in my handlebar bag during a weekend tour a few years ago. I had to
    > > bunnyhop an obstacle at speed (about 35mph) and the camera flew out of the bag, hit the
    > > pavement, then slid about 40 feet before exiting into the ditch. I retrieved it and other than a
    > > few scratches, it survived quite well. The pictures even turned out nice!
    >
    > How long do people carry the same camera around? I would think that a year or two in a saddle bag
    > would ruin the film, even if the dirt etc. hadn't ruined the camera. I suppose if you get
    > harassed frequently that wouldn't be a problem. For that matter, it probably doesn't really need
    > to work, except the flash. If people think you've just taken their picture, they'll likely behave
    > for a while.

    Or it might just set off a real whacko. Probably better to catch the licence plate and place a
    formal complaint at the local cop shop. Actually, I'd be surprised if I could get the camera out and
    take a picture before the car was out of range.
     
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