Riis: Tyler can't win.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Callistus Valer, Dec 22, 2003.

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  1. Bijarne Riis said he doesn't think Tyler can win the TDF. "He can't keep the bike upright. At every
    corner we expected to see Tyler hanging in a tree, it was terrifying."
     
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  2. >Bijarne Riis said he doesn't think Tyler can win the TDF. "He can't keep the bike upright. At every
    >corner we expected to see Tyler hanging in a tree, it was terrifying."

    Considering he had a broken collarbone, he did pretty good at keeping the bike upright... and
    considering he wasn't the cause of the crash where said collarbone was broken... I think he did a
    marvellous job at keeping the bike upright! Sounds a wee bit like sour grapes that Tyler has
    switched teams

    Festive cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get correct one remove dependency on fame &
    fortune h*$el*$$e**nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$
     
  3. Eric

    Eric Guest

    He does have a point. Every tour he could have one have been taken away from him by a crash whether
    he caused it or not. Eric
     
  4. Wasn't it Napoleon who said the skill he most prized in generals was luck? The same can be said for
    the peloton I guess. Neither Armstrong nor (IIRC) Big Mig had their tours interrupted with injuries
    like Eddie and Bernard. I've heard a lot of pros quoted as saying Armstrong is as lucky as he is
    good. Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.

    "Eric" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > He does have a point. Every tour he could have one have been taken away from him by a crash
    > whether he caused it or not. Eric
     
  5. "Fastest Fat Climber" <[email protected]> wrote in news:0aidnTiHFsmAoHqiRVn-
    [email protected]:

    > Wasn't it Napoleon who said the skill he most prized in generals was luck? The same can be said
    > for the peloton I guess. Neither Armstrong nor (IIRC) Big Mig had their tours interrupted with
    > injuries like Eddie and Bernard. I've heard a lot of pros quoted as saying Armstrong is as lucky
    > as he is good. Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.

    Half of the "luck" you speak of when it comes to crashing (the other half being your responsibility
    to keep your rubber end down) is knowing where to ride in a pack in a given situation. You need to
    know who's wheel to follow, how close to follow, and most importantly, who's wheel *not* to follow.
    Some p33ps would say LA and MI were lucky riders. Others would say they were cagey and clever
    riders. Sometimes we make our own "luck".

    - Boyd S.
     
  6. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Bijarne Riis said he doesn't think Tyler can win the TDF. "He can't keep the bike upright. At
    > every corner we expected to see Tyler hanging in a tree, it was terrifying."
    >
    >

    Troll Dave
     
  7. > Wasn't it Napoleon who said the skill he most prized in generals was luck? The same can be said
    > for the peloton I guess. Neither Armstrong nor
    (IIRC)
    > Big Mig had their tours interrupted with injuries like Eddie and Bernard. I've heard a lot of pros
    > quoted as saying Armstrong is as lucky as he is good. Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.

    Armstrong is most definitely lucky; you don't survive, much less win 5 TDFs in a row with a run of
    bad luck. However, he also has something else going for him... confidence. As he rode through that
    field (after Beloki crashed) he probably wasn't thinking about anything other than getting back into
    the race. He wasn't going to stop, but rather just continued riding forward, knowing he was going in
    the right direction and he had momentum. Why stop?

    To some extent it requires a suspension of disbelief. I experienced this myself five years ago, when
    I decided to try my hand at racing again after an absence of 25 years. At first it seemed a bit
    scary; I hadn't ridden in such close proximity to others in quite some time, and my cornering was
    initially a bit scary. Then I realized hey, if that guy can take that line (and not crash), so can
    I. Once confidence returned, no problem, I could do anything I wanted. It was as if the rider-bike
    combo had magically transformed into something capable of extraordinary things, well beyond the way
    I'd normally ride.

    Armstrong believes that he is in control of his own destiny. I think that makes a difference. I
    don't know what Tyler thinks, I just know that everybody who's met him thinks he's one heck of a
    great guy, and from watching him, know that he's got one heck of a huge heart (not just physically,
    but mentally).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles www.ChainReaction.com

    "Fastest Fat Climber" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Wasn't it Napoleon who said the skill he most prized in generals was luck? The same can be said
    > for the peloton I guess. Neither Armstrong nor
    (IIRC)
    > Big Mig had their tours interrupted with injuries like Eddie and Bernard. I've heard a lot of pros
    > quoted as saying Armstrong is as lucky as he is good. Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.
    >
    >
    > "Eric" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > He does have a point. Every tour he could have one have been taken away from him by a crash
    > > whether he caused it or not. Eric
    > >
    >
     
  8. "Fastest Fat Climber" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.
    >
    >

    Year after year, Tyler consistently crashes more than other riders of his caliber. That's not luck,
    that's lack of something.
     
  9. Ken Prager

    Ken Prager Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "hold my beer and watch this..." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Fastest Fat Climber" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Year after year, Tyler consistently crashes more than other riders of his caliber. That's not
    > luck, that's lack of something.
    >
    >

    You know, I read three separate diary entries from Tyler this past season where he crashed while moto-
    pacing. Sounds like me might not learn from past mistakes.

    KP

    --
    Remove _me_ for e-mail address
     
  10. "hold my beer and watch this..." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Fastest Fat Climber" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Year after year, Tyler consistently crashes more than other riders of his caliber. That's not
    > luck, that's lack of something.

    Dumbass -

    You are correct.

    Imagine what would have happened to Tyler if he would have been in LANCE's position when Beloki
    went down.
     
  11. Chris

    Chris Guest

    Perhaps, Dave, but sources close to Tyler say he's a terrible bike handler and his track record
    doesn't seem to refute it. However, as bad as he might be, the guys done more than most ever will in
    this sport. That's pretty amazing!

    CH

    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Bijarne Riis said he doesn't think Tyler can win the TDF. "He can't keep the bike upright. At
    > > every corner we expected to see Tyler hanging in a tree, it was terrifying."
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Troll Dave
     
  12. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Boyd Speerschneider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Fastest Fat Climber" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:0aidnTiHFsmAoHqiRVn-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    > > Wasn't it Napoleon who said the skill he most prized in generals
    was luck?
    > > The same can be said for the peloton I guess. Neither Armstrong
    nor (IIRC)
    > > Big Mig had their tours interrupted with injuries like Eddie and
    Bernard.
    > > I've heard a lot of pros quoted as saying Armstrong is as lucky as
    he is
    > > good. Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.
    >
    > Half of the "luck" you speak of when it comes to crashing (the other
    half
    > being your responsibility to keep your rubber end down) is knowing
    where to
    > ride in a pack in a given situation. You need to know who's wheel to
    follow,
    > how close to follow, and most importantly, who's wheel *not* to
    follow. Some
    > p33ps would say LA and MI were lucky riders. Others would say they
    were
    > cagey and clever riders. Sometimes we make our own "luck".

    You don't seem to understand that the reason that Lance and Miguel were "lucky" was because they
    were born strong already and training didn't make them a whole lot better. That allowed them to
    always ride near the front. Up there you don't often get knocked down.

    Tyler was a rider born weak and he has built himself up to that level. He's always ridden in the
    pack and is used to riding back there. In the pack you stand a much greater chance of being knocked
    down especially when the pack is nervous like near the end of a race when the sprinters teams are
    moving all around and if you miss your leadout you may lose your contract.

    Tyler has to learn to ride on the front, but Riis is sprouting a large infestation of very
    sour grapes.
     
  13. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Perhaps, Dave, but sources close to Tyler say he's a terrible bike handler and his track record
    > doesn't seem to refute it. However, as bad as he might be, the guys done more than most ever will
    > in this sport. That's pretty amazing!

    I understand that, but the original poster didn't site an article where that was actually quoted by
    Riis, I think Riis has plenty of respect for Tyler

    Dave
     
  14. "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    Big snip

    > Tyler was a rider born weak and he has built himself up to that level.

    Oh that I were born with that same weakness!
     
  15. Matt Cahill

    Matt Cahill Guest

    "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Bijarne Riis said he doesn't think Tyler can win the TDF. "He can't keep the bike upright. At
    > every corner we expected to see Tyler hanging in a tree, it was terrifying."

    You are so full of crap ! If you dumped that weight you would not have needed to beg mama
    for that C50.

    When you grow up I'm certain you will have a career with some type of gossip magazine. You have a
    sort of flair for making up 'news' stories.
     
  16. Barryg

    Barryg Guest

    ."Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I understand that, but the original poster didn't site an article where
    that was actually quoted by
    > Riis, I think Riis has plenty of respect for Tyler

    I'm with Dave - bogus quote unless proven otherwise . . .
     
  17. Matabala

    Matabala Guest

    Nonsense - you make your own luck

    "Fastest Fat Climber" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Wasn't it Napoleon who said the skill he most prized in generals was luck? The same can be said
    > for the peloton I guess. Neither Armstrong nor
    (IIRC)
    > Big Mig had their tours interrupted with injuries like Eddie and Bernard. I've heard a lot of pros
    > quoted as saying Armstrong is as lucky as he is good. Tyler is as unlucky as he is good.
    >
    >
    > "Eric" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > He does have a point. Every tour he could have one have been taken away from him by a crash
    > > whether he caused it or not. Eric
    > >
    >
     
  18. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "matabala" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Nonsense - you make your own luck

    Does that mean that you can see and miss all the little pieces of glass that are all over the road?
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "matabala" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Nonsense - you make your own luck
    >
    > Does that mean that you can see and miss all the little pieces of glass that are all over
    > the road?

    Well, yes.

    I have been known to choose to ride through glass when I have decided I didn't have a useful exit,
    but glass is one of the easiest road hazards to spot.

    As for missing them, to an extent it's a matter of what risks you're willing to take.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
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