Rik Van Steenbergen

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bart, May 15, 2003.

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  1. Bart

    Bart Guest

    died this evening at the age of 78.

    I
     
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  2. Ronde Champ

    Ronde Champ Guest

  3. Bart wrote:

    > died this evening at the age of 78.
    >
    > I

    Sad to hear. He might easily be on anyone's list of the greatest.

    Steve

    --
    Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS Brooklyn, NY 718-258-5001 http://www.dentaltwins.com
     
  4. On Thu, 15 May 2003 15:11:31 -0400, ronde champ wrote:
    >Is that Ted Danson's father in law?

    No they are from the poor branch without the "Van".
     
  5. J999w

    J999w Guest

    Robert Stack died too. 84?

    jw
     
  6. Benjo Maso

    Benjo Maso Guest

    "Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Bart wrote:
    >
    > > died this evening at the age of 78.
    > >
    > > I
    >
    > Sad to hear. He might easily be on anyone's list of the greatest.

    Without any doubt. In his career Van Steenbergen won 952 races, 322 on the road and 630 on the
    track. And yet, according to many insiders he sold more races than he won. Van Steenbergen make no
    secret of riding for the money in the fitrst place. If losing was bringing in more money than
    winning, he didn't hesitate to loose. He was not interested in building up a palmares, he only won
    important races to increase his market value at kermesses and trackraces. He always put a clausule
    in his contracts that after he had won a classic, he didn't have to participate to other road races.
    For instance, after his victory in Milan-San Remo in 1954 he only participated to the Giro (winning
    4 stages). The rest of the year he was travelling around Europe, showing up everywhere were they was
    ready to pay him a starting fee. He never took a week off and usually slept in his car to save
    money. Yet he had a very long career. He became Belgian champion 18, won the Ronde van Vlaanderen at
    19 and ended his career at 42. In between he became three times worldchampion, won Paris-Roubaix
    (twice), the Ronde (twice), the Flèche Wallone (twice), Paris Bruxelles and Milan-San Remo. Between
    1946 and 1958 he was almost unbeatable in the sprint, and if he had been protected by a team like
    Saeco or Telekom (unthinkable in the 1950's) nobody could have beaten him in the classics. He was
    much too heavy to a good climber (83 kg), but was still capable of finishing second in a Giro
    d'Italia (after Magni, but before Kübler, Coppi, Koblet, Bobet, Bartali, etc.). After his stopped
    racing he really didn't know what to do. He he a short career as an actor in soft porno-movies, and
    was arrested and convicted because of his connections with a criminal organisation. But because he
    was really a good man at heart and had as a rider always been completely honest and even generous,
    the cycling world quickly forgave him and until a few month ago he was ofteen seen at races in
    Belgium. He was especially very happy with the creation of the Grand Prix Rik van Steenbergen some
    twelve years ago. May he rest in peace.

    Benjo Maso
     
  7. On Thu, 15 May 2003 22:22:34 +0100, benjo maso wrote:
    >He became Belgian champion 18, won the Ronde van Vlaanderen at 19 and ended his career at 42. In
    >between he became three times worldchampion, won Paris-Roubaix (twice), the Ronde (twice), the
    >Flèche Wallone (twice), Paris Bruxelles and Milan-San Remo. [...] May he rest in peace.

    What a god.
     
  8. benjo maso wrote:
    > "Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>
    >>Bart wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>died this evening at the age of 78.
    >>>
    >>>I
    >>
    >> Sad to hear. He might easily be on anyone's list of the greatest.
    >
    >
    >
    > Without any doubt. In his career Van Steenbergen won 952 races, 322 on the road and 630 on the
    > track. And yet, according to many insiders he sold more races than he won. Van Steenbergen make no
    > secret of riding for the money in the fitrst place. If losing was bringing in more money than
    > winning, he didn't hesitate to loose. He was not interested in building up a palmares, he only won
    > important races to increase his market value at kermesses and trackraces. He always put a clausule
    > in his contracts that after he had won a classic, he didn't have to participate to other road
    > races. For instance, after his victory in Milan-San Remo in 1954 he only participated to the Giro
    > (winning 4 stages). The rest of the year he was travelling around Europe, showing up everywhere
    > were they was ready to pay him a starting fee. He never took a week off and usually slept in his
    > car to save money. Yet he had a very long career. He became Belgian champion 18, won the Ronde van
    > Vlaanderen at 19 and ended his career at 42. In between he became three times worldchampion, won
    > Paris-Roubaix (twice), the Ronde (twice), the Flèche Wallone (twice), Paris Bruxelles and
    > Milan-San Remo. Between 1946 and 1958 he was almost unbeatable in the sprint, and if he had been
    > protected by a team like Saeco or Telekom (unthinkable in the 1950's) nobody could have beaten him
    > in the classics. He was much too heavy to a good climber (83 kg), but was still capable of
    > finishing second in a Giro d'Italia (after Magni, but before Kübler, Coppi, Koblet, Bobet,
    > Bartali, etc.). After his stopped racing he really didn't know what to do. He he a short career as
    > an actor in soft porno-movies, and was arrested and convicted because of his connections with a
    > criminal organisation. But because he was really a good man at heart and had as a rider always
    > been completely honest and even generous, the cycling world quickly forgave him and until a few
    > month ago he was ofteen seen at races in Belgium. He was especially very happy with the creation
    > of the Grand Prix Rik van Steenbergen some twelve years ago. May he rest in peace.
    >
    > Benjo Maso

    I was hoping you'd post. You (Or I, in any case) can't find this info in the states. Thanks,

    Steve

    >
     
  9. "Steven Bornfeld" > wrote in message
    > benjo maso wrote:
    > > "Mark & Steven Bornfeld DDS" wrote in message
    > >>Bart wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>died this evening at the age of 78.
    > >>
    > >> Sad to hear. He might easily be on anyone's list of the greatest.

    > >
    > > Without any doubt. In his career Van Steenbergen won 952 races, 322 on
    the
    > > road and 630 on the track.
    > Benjo Maso
    >
    > I was hoping you'd post. You (Or I, in any case) can't find this info in the states. Thanks,
    >
    > Steve

    Memory is water over a stone in the stream.. The edges are smoothed, the stone less pointed, as days
    pass. Better an accurate picture, as Benjo gave us, than a place in the stream.

    -Chris Mitchell
     
  10. Bart

    Bart Guest

    TV news showed images of his farewell track meeting. He had like an Average Master Racer's Belly.

    What he said: "I regret not making enough money out of it. I liked racing too much. Organizers knew
    I would agree to ride anyway."
     
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