Rim recommendation please



bobqzzi

New Member
Sep 14, 2012
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After not riding for many years I got back into last summer.

I found I had a set of brand Zipp 415 40mm Carbon/Aluminum rims hanging in the attic, so I built them into wheels.

The front one failed the first time it got hot going down Evan's notch in NH. The rear is okay, but a bit shaky and will need to be replaced before too long I think.

I'd like find rims of similar weight/aero profile that I can build myself using the hubs I have.

So, any recommendations for rims that:

Are about 40mm deep
decently light weight. (Zipps are 525g, but I'm willing to trade some weight for better durability)
I can get just the rim
come 24/32 hole.

I know oftentimes wheelsets are available as packages, but the hubs are near new AC Micro 58 and a Powertap G3, so I'd like to reuse them
 

bobqzzi

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Sep 14, 2012
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Originally Posted by daveryanwyoming .

Kinlin XR-380 (38mm alloy) or XR-300 (30mm alloy) both are reasonably light and bombproof.
Looks great for a front, but no 32 for the back. Not that I would mind mixing different rims
 

daveryanwyoming

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Oct 3, 2006
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Originally Posted by bobqzzi .


Looks great for a front, but no 32 for the back. Not that I would mind mixing different rims
These guys have the XR-380 in 28 and 32 hole drilling: http://fairwheelbikes.com/kinlin-xr380-clincher-rim-p-3453.html

and Wheelbuilder has the XR-300 in both drillings as well.

-Dave
 

Sarah Lau

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Sep 4, 2012
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I would like to recommend the Full Carbon tubular rims, which is lighter, better rolling resistance and more comfortable ride.

These guys have the 38mm depth, with 16-32H drilling. http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/F-R38-T-38mm-tubular-bicycle-rims-carbon-road-rims/814021_627673152.html
 

bobqzzi

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Sep 14, 2012
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Thanks for the recomendation, although this is possibly spam? Not to reignite the clincher vs tubular war, lets just say I prefer clinchers.

Also rims, of any sort make no difference in ride comfort.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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bobqzzi said:
Thanks for the recomendation, although this is possibly spam?  Not to reignite the clincher vs tubular war, lets just say I prefer clinchers. Also rims, of any sort make no difference in ride comfort.
Yes, it is spam. They're also woefully wrong: rims don't have rolling resistance. Tires do. Rims can make a difference in comfort. Traditional alloy box rims have a bit more compliance than deep rims. Of course that can also be moderated by tire pressure which is likely a bigger effect.
 

Dr Lodge

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May 3, 2012
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Gigantex 50mm Tubular Rim, but I think its only available in 20/24/28 holes. And its tubular.
 

bobqzzi

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Sep 14, 2012
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Originally Posted by Dr Lodge .

Gigantex 50mm Tubular Rim, but I think its only available in 20/24/28 holes. And its tubular.
Hmm...looks like they make clinchers as well- just need to see if I can find the 24 hole. Comments seem to run to "ruggedly built" which would be good

No chance I'll ever run tubulars.
 

Ohthewheelguy

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Aug 13, 2012
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I've been riding the HED C-2 clinchers all summer, the same rim used in building the Ardennes wheel sets, and am very happy with them. I'm certain they are available in both 24 and 32 hole as well.
 

danfoz

Well-Known Member
Apr 12, 2011
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Originally Posted by Ohthewheelguy .

I've been riding the HED C-2 clinchers all summer, the same rim used in building the Ardennes wheel sets, and am very happy with them. I'm certain they are available in both 24 and 32 hole as well.
I have the HED C2's laced to Campy 32H hubs. Finish is impeccable. The ride is comfortable (recommended psi is 85), they roll fast, and apparently share similar aerodynamics to the 101's - doubtful however anyone will notice that difference in a real world application. After riding these around for a couple months I am pretty much sold on the concept of wider rims.
 

bobqzzi

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Sep 14, 2012
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Hmm the C2s are not aero, but I am considering them now as they are reasonably priced and quite light.
 

bobqzzi

New Member
Sep 14, 2012
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Hmm the C2s are not aero, but I am considering them now as they are reasonably priced and quite light.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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bobqzzi said:
Hmm  the C2s are not aero, but I am considering them now as they are reasonably priced and quite light.  
The C2's are not deep aero rims, but they are aero.
 

danfoz

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Apr 12, 2011
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Originally Posted by alienator .


The C2's are not deep aero rims, but they are aero.
Yup. HED's C2's and Zipp's 101's give roughly the same time savings in their documentation compared to the "standard" box section rim (i.e. the Mavic Ksyrium): 40 secs over 25k. Although I wouldn't TT with these wheels, there were a at least a dozen placings in a recent area time trial within 40 secs of each other. They are certainly no liability. But who cares? The ride is sublime.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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danfoz said:
The ride is sublime.
I'll agree with the sublime nature of the ride on wide rims. I've got Velocity A23 rims, and the ride is very nice, especially on Michelin PR3 skins.
 

bobqzzi

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Sep 14, 2012
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Originally Posted by danfoz .


The ride is sublime.
Not sure what you mean. Are you suggesting that different rims give different rides? Or does the wider rim allow lower pressure to be run which definitely affects ride?
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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bobqzzi said:
Not sure what you mean.  Are you suggesting that different rims give different rides? Or does the wider rim allow lower pressure to be run which definitely affects ride?
Certainly rims can affect ride quality. An extreme example would be the ride of an 80mm deep rim compared to that of a shallow box section rim. The box section rim will tend to have a much more compliant ride. The reasons for the more compliant ride of a wide rim compared to a standard rim are two-fold:
  1. A tire of a given size will enclose a larger air volume on a wide rim than on a narrow rim. As a result, the tire can be run at lower pressures, which yields a better ride.
  2. With the sides of the tire effectively shorter on a wide rim and the tire cross section assuming a larger radius, the tire becomes a bit less stiff.
An added bonus is that the contact patch shape is different for a tire on a wide rim than it is for that same tire on a narrow rim. It is shorter from front to back and wider on wide rim. This reduces tire rolling resistance as the tread has less deformity passing through the contact patch. Tread deformity increases with increasing contact patch length, all else being equal.
 
Nov 30, 2012
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The lady posting about the tubulars may be spam or may not be. Look at her uploaded photos. They have a new line of carbon rims that are sweet looking. I am trying to get a set atm.-David
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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David Gerchman said:
The lady posting about the tubulars may be spam or may not be. Look at her uploaded photos. They have a new line of carbon rims that are sweet looking. I am trying to get a set atm.-David
Really? First, have you ever used tubulars? Are you prepared to spend a day getting tires glued to rims properly, and then are you prepared to carry a spare glued tire with you? Running tubulars requires a bit of a commitment. Why exactly would you want to run tubulars? Or are you considering carbon fiber clinchers? Using CF clinchers requires understanding their limitations and the adjustments you need to make when you using them. Do you know how to brake properly on long descents? It's important to know because improper braking causes heat build up in the clincher brake track which can result in the clincher hook and brake track failing, you tire blowing dramatically off the rim, crashing hard....and destroying a set of wheels in the process. Assuming that you are aware of all that and are aware that heat management tech is one of the most important considerations in a CF clincher. Companies like Zipp, Enve, Reynolds, and a few others have invested a lot of money to better understand and to effectively manage heat so that their rims don't fail. What has the generic company that Sarah Lau represents done in that area? Have you read the reports of the failures of such generic rims? They are not few in number. Granted not all of them are bad, but how are you to know which ones aren't? What warranty do you think you'll get from generic company X? This is all important stuff to know before you invest in something that is not going to change your performance very much at all. There are a lot of reasons to use CF clinchers or tubulars, and there are a lot of people that do. It's not something, however, the should be done blindly or on a whim, especially when you can get equally good performance from an alloy clincher or tubeless wheel, especially given your size. FWIW, I'm not anti-CF wheel at all. I've owned three sets of CF tubular aero rims. I am against buying something from a spammer because it looks ok in one or two pictures, pictures provided by and possibly manipulated by said spammer.