Rim replacement on the cheap

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Adam Rush, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    A friend of mine is going to be sending me a Gazelle in a few months.
    The problem is that it's the wrong kind of 28" (28" x 1 1/2") for where
    I live. I'd like to replace the rims with 700C ones, but the hubs have
    got to stay.

    I was wondering if it would be a good (or a very bad) idea to just tap
    7-8 mm of thread on the existing spokes and clip the ends. I'm not
    familiar with the steps that go into the manufacture of spoke thread.
    It looks unlikely that such a die would cost more than the spokes I'd
    have to buy.
     
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  2. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    I suggest you find a shop in your area that has a good Phil Wood Spoke machine that has experience using it. Find out how much it cost to have the spokes threaded and cut.
    You can then compare the price to buying new.
    Does the Gazelle use rim brakes?
    If so, how are you going to get them to reach the "lowered" rim height?
     
  3. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Adam Rush" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A friend of mine is going to be sending me a Gazelle in a few months.
    > The problem is that it's the wrong kind of 28" (28" x 1 1/2") for where
    > I live. I'd like to replace the rims with 700C ones, but the hubs have
    > got to stay.
    >
    > I was wondering if it would be a good (or a very bad) idea to just tap
    > 7-8 mm of thread on the existing spokes and clip the ends. I'm not
    > familiar with the steps that go into the manufacture of spoke thread.
    > It looks unlikely that such a die would cost more than the spokes I'd
    > have to buy.


    Bad idea, as the die will cut the threads and weaken the spokes. You
    want the threads to be rolled. To do that, you'd have to find a bike
    shop with a Phil Wood or other spoke machine. But the problem with this
    is that you have to take all the spokes out of the wheel, but the spokes
    have taken a "set" in terms of their position in the wheels (inside vs.
    outside, leading vs. trailing) and if you put them back into the wheel
    in the wrong positions they are more likely to break. So you'd have to
    sort and label them, and put them back into the wheel in the same
    positions. What a PITA.

    This is a traditional black Dutch roadster, right? IIRC there aren't a
    wide range of bikes using that size any more- just those and bikes like
    Flying Pigeons and such in China, India and Africa. Those tires aren't
    that hard to find. Stay with the originals. It'd be *much* simpler.
    If you absolutely have to switch, go with 27" rather than 700C to give
    you at least some chance with brake compatibility.
     
  4. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    Okay, good to know about the rolling and what not.

    This is a rod-operated drum brake roadster. I realize that 28x1 1/2"
    is probably the most popular tyre size out there, but 700C (28x 1 5/8")
    is infinitely more practical where I live, and, plus, I have some rims
    lying around.
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Adam Rush wrote:

    > A friend of mine is going to be sending me a Gazelle in a few months.
    > The problem is that it's the wrong kind of 28" (28" x 1 1/2") for where
    > I live. I'd like to replace the rims with 700C ones, but the hubs have
    > got to stay.
    >
    > I was wondering if it would be a good (or a very bad) idea to just tap
    > 7-8 mm of thread on the existing spokes and clip the ends. I'm not
    > familiar with the steps that go into the manufacture of spoke thread.
    > It looks unlikely that such a die would cost more than the spokes I'd
    > have to buy.


    That's not possible.
    Spoke threads are rolled, that is, they are formed by
    pushing the material in at the trough which raises the
    peaks. Dies can't do that - they simply cut away material,
    which would leave the thread too small. Run your finger over
    a spoke or look at one in a lens- it's obvious.
    Theoretically you could ask someone with the proper tooling
    to shorten your spokes but spokes -even premium quality
    bright butted stainless - are dirt cheap compared to skilled
    labor.

    OK, that tiny issue aside, you are at another block. The
    typical domestic model Gazelle uses rim brakes which pull up
    from the bottom of the rim rather than press on the side. If
    your Gazelle is like that, the 28-inch Roadster rims are
    staying. (Wait until you see it at any rate - better models
    have beautiful 28" stainless rims you may want to keep anyway.)

    If the bike has hub brakes you can easily change to 700C.
    With a Velocity Dyad and Michelin 700-40, the aspect is very
    close. Here's such a conversion:

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/KARENDL2.JPG


    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  6. Unbutted 14g spokes can be purchased for $0.35/ea on the web. Are you
    sure you bank account can't handle a $20 expenditure ?? A tap would
    probably cost about $20 to get started ...

    - Don Gillies
    San Diego, CA
     
  7. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Donald Gillies wrote:
    > Unbutted 14g spokes can be purchased for $0.35/ea on the web. Are you
    > sure you bank account can't handle a $20 expenditure ?? A tap would
    > probably cost about $20 to get started ...


    And premium quality bright butted stainless are only $24 per
    wheel with nipples. Hardly expensive

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  8. a 28" is a fat tire 27" rim, right?
    panaracer has wonderful quality 27" tires with kevlar beads
    (nashbar)but mostly 27" tires are extinct - except for the michelin?
    lbs labor re rolling spokes is more than the spoke's materail costs.
    if you do not ride hi mileages, a two wheel MO set with hubs may be a
    good deal - cheaper hubs but instant ride getting tires at the same time
     
  9. pasela not panaracer: panaracer is a pasela product
     
  10. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > a 28" is a fat tire 27" rim, right?
    > panaracer has wonderful quality 27" tires with kevlar beads
    > (nashbar)but mostly 27" tires are extinct - except for the michelin?


    Serfas

    > lbs labor re rolling spokes is more than the spoke's materail costs.
    > if you do not ride hi mileages, a two wheel MO set with hubs may be a
    > good deal - cheaper hubs but instant ride getting tires at the same time


    --
    Michael Press
     
  11. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    [email protected] wrote in news:1143504819.215974.138520
    @u72g2000cwu.googlegroups.com:

    > pasela not panaracer: panaracer is a pasela product
    >


    Other way around. Panaracer is the manufacturer (the marketing name of
    National Tire), Pasela is one of their many models.
     
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