Rim Tape

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by watson10, Jun 4, 2003.

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  1. watson10

    watson10 New Member

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    I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?

    Cheers,

    Tom


    [I hope this isn't considered a cross post]
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, watson10 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    >this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?

    Electrical tape can be cut by the spoke holes in the rim bed, I don't recommend it. As long as it
    doesn't get a cut it should work OK. If you install to many layers of it you may have tire fit
    problems - you will need to be sparing with it.

    I like cloth rim tape (eg, Velox) or one of the slightly stretchy plastic ones.

    --Paul
     
  3. Tezza

    Tezza New Member

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    I agree, cloth tape is a much better option than electrical tape - Velox cloth tape is fairly thick. This means that just one layer will be sufficient to protect your tube from spoke intrusion and it is light enough not to have any real impact. I put Velox on my hybrid rims and have run up over 7000km in 18 months and the tape is still pristine. The other problem with electrical tape is that it usually leaves a sticky residue when you remove it - this can be a pain to clean off when it is time to reapply the tape.
    ;)
     
  4. I doubt that electrical tape would work. At least not for very long. I've never tried it though.
    Cloth handlebar tape will work fine, I've used it in an emergency (my LBS didn't have any rim tape).
    Never did have to take it off.

    However, why not just use Velox? It's not expensive.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  5. Mike Wright

    Mike Wright Guest

    On 5 Jun 2003 07:30:06 +0950, watson10 <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    >this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?
    >

    I use Velox cloth tape. It lasts forever. Once, in a pinch, when I had nothing else, I used packing
    tape (the kind with the threads in it) on my Dad's cruiser rim. I don't recommend the one-piece
    plastic strips; I had one crack and allow the tube to blow out into the spoke holes.
     
  6. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Tom Watson writes:

    > I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    > this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?

    No, you cannot use electrical tape because it is plastic especially to form around wire joints ant
    the like. It will stretch and break out into any hollow section rim with time and cause an internal
    tube failure, air escaping from the spoke nipples and stem hole. You need a tape that is either too
    tough to stretch like electrical tape, or a cloth tape like Velox.

    Velox tape has the disadvantage that, after being in place for some time, it cannot easily be lifted
    to replace a spoke nipple in the event of a spoke failure at the nipple. Today this is not so much a
    problem as it was in the days of yore when spoke stress relieving was unknown.

    Use Velox and be done with it. Kool-Stop makes a good plastic easily removable one but then I don't
    know if your bicycle shop carries it.

    http://koolstop.com/brakes/accessories.html

    see Rim Guard tape. It lasts for years and many rims. I've used it from back in the days of frequent
    spoke replacements.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  7. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "watson10" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    > this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Tom
    >
    I used to run electrical tape as a cost saving option. Being a broke college student needing that
    $6.00 for a pitcher of beer will do that...

    I found that you need 3 or so layers of tape to keep it from expanding too far into the eyelets
    (Mavic rims).

    Wouldn't really recommend it, but if you wanna experiment, go for it. The packing tape mentioned in
    this thread somewhere else is a better choice.

    One of the things I've started doing on my low spoke count wheels is cutting 2" strips of Velox
    and only covering the spoke holes. I figure bare rim isn't going to flat my tubes... Seems to work
    just fine.

    Mike
     
  8. Fredzep

    Fredzep Guest

    "watson10" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    > this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >

    I tried the electrical tape idea and it didn't work. Like others here have suggested velox
    works the best.

    Fredzep
    --
    "Gravity is a harsh misstress" The Tick
     
  9. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I am sure that in far provinces of China, or a dusty town in Afghanistan or perhaps villages deep in
    the Amazon basin, electrical tape has sometimes been the best available rim tape.

    If you are reading this message, you have Internet access. And a computer. And electricity. Most
    likely indoor plumbing and a local McDonalds. Perhaps even a Starbucks. And - best of all - you are
    near genuine bicycle rim tape.

    Go. Get some. Put it on your wheel.

    "watson10" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    > this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?
     
  10. Ed Chait

    Ed Chait Guest

    Ok, what works good on single wall rims?

    They all seem to come with the ubiquitious rubber strip, which works well until it dries out
    and tears.

    I tried to apply tape to one of these rims, but the tape won't seat well due to the spoke nipples in
    the bed of the rim. It appears that pressure from the tube would cause the tape to tear around the
    nipple, as there is some slack there.

    Do the plastic rim liners work well on these rims? Something else?

    Ed Chait
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    >this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?

    pros - none thtat I can think of cons - your tires will go through the tape and then
    eventually fail.

    Get real rim tape. I recommend good old velox cloth rim tape.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  12. On Wed, 04 Jun 2003 23:47:27 GMT, [email protected] wrote:

    Going off on a tangent..

    >Velox tape has the disadvantage that, after being in place for some time, it cannot easily be
    >lifted to replace a spoke nipple in the event of a spoke failure at the nipple. Today this is not
    >so much a problem as it was in the days of yore when spoke stress relieving was unknown.

    So if a wheel is not properly stress relieved, that's when it can break spokes at the nipple? I've
    almost never seen that happen, I think. Back when I made my first wheel, I do remember that it
    snapped spokes like crazy and I eventually had the LBS do it over from scratch. Partially it must
    have been that I used a used, bent rim, partially, that I didn't really know what I was doing (some
    would argue that is still the case), and partially that I set up a bit on the tight side. I think
    they were mostly failing from being too close to the snapping point, and snapping under relatively
    light loads. However, even on that wheel, most if not all went on the heads.

    I wonder if there's a WAV or mp3 somewhere with various tones on it to compare to spoke strummings.

    Jasper
     
  13. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Jasper Janssen wrote:
    > So if a wheel is not properly stress relieved, that's when it can break spokes at the nipple? I've
    > almost never seen that happen, I think.

    Only time I've had it happen was with a rear wheel that I built with almost no dish. It had to be
    clamped in the dropouts at a bit of an angle to clear the brakepads. Lasted for quite a few thousand
    miles but then started repeatedly breaking spokes - all were at the nipple on the non-drive side.
     
  14. > Tom Watson writes:
    >> I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new
    >> to this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > You need a tape that is either too tough to stretch like electrical tape, or a cloth tape
    > like Velox.

    I usually use Velox tape on my wheels, but on one of my wheels, the rim/tire fit is very tight
    making tire removal/installation nearly impossible with plastic levers. (Ritchey OCR Comp/Avocet
    City 1.5) To increase the depth of the rim bed, I have removed the relatively thick Velox tape and
    installed one layer of gaffer's tape. I've managed 500 flat-free miles on this setup, not enough to
    draw conclusions, but enough to suggest that this might be a viable alternative.

    --
    Bill Bushnell
     
  15. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Ed Chait" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Ok, what works good on single wall rims?
    >
    > They all seem to come with the ubiquitious rubber strip, which works well until it dries out
    > and tears.
    >
    > I tried to apply tape to one of these rims, but the tape won't seat well
    due
    > to the spoke nipples in the bed of the rim. It appears that pressure from the tube would cause the
    > tape to tear around the nipple, as there is some slack there.
    >
    > Do the plastic rim liners work well on these rims? Something else?

    The proper width rubber rim liner is best. We do not commonly see "dried out" rubber rim liners,
    even on older bikes. They seem to go twenty years or so.

    Kool Stop and Panasonic used to make a series of polyurethane liners for solid rims, notably for
    that danmed Weinmann A124 which required a special narrow size. I think they are discontinued. The
    new (2002) Velox product like them ( the white one) is horrid - tears across the nipples.

    "Proper width" means sufficient to cover the nipples without occluding the bead seat.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  16. Ns>

    Ns> Guest

    You need to have the right tools for the job always. You wouldn't think of using a drill and drill
    bit to cut sheetrock... Do it right,and do it well, and your efforts will pay off for a long time.
    It's just too easy to do it right. I had 5 flats on a public ride of 50 miles in 1990 from a
    spoke-through punture... Anything less than Velox (including the crackable plastic as it gets old)
    is a mistake in my non-professional opinion.

    My2c, NS
     
  17. In article <eJQDa.357$%[email protected]>, Bill Bushnell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Tom Watson writes:
    >>> I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new
    >>> to this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?
    >
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> You need a tape that is either too tough to stretch like electrical tape, or a cloth tape
    >> like Velox.
    >
    >I usually use Velox tape on my wheels, but on one of my wheels, the rim/tire fit is very tight
    >making tire removal/installation nearly impossible with plastic levers. (Ritchey OCR Comp/Avocet
    >City 1.5) To increase the depth of the rim bed, I have removed the relatively thick Velox tape and
    >installed one layer of gaffer's tape. I've managed 500 flat-free miles on this setup, not enough to
    >draw conclusions, but enough to suggest that this might be a viable alternative.

    We had problems like this with the very early Bontrager cut-down MA-40 rims as well. The thinnest
    stuff I know of to put in there is fiber tape, barely takes any of it to work. Pain in the ass to
    remove too.

    --Paul
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, Ed Chait
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >Ok, what works good on single wall rims?
    >
    >They all seem to come with the ubiquitious rubber strip, which works well until it dries out
    >and tears.

    Those rimstrips can squirm around because they aren't tight enough, it's easy to have an intact
    rubber rimstrip and still get a flat from tube against spoke nipple.

    >I tried to apply tape to one of these rims, but the tape won't seat well due to the spoke nipples
    >in the bed of the rim. It appears that pressure from the tube would cause the tape to tear around
    >the nipple, as there is some slack there.

    Use narrow Velox and adhere it to the rim with a thin film of contact cement. Otherwise it will not
    stick well, especially if it's a new wheel with lube around the nipples.

    --Paul
     
  19. R J Peterson

    R J Peterson Guest

    Nobody has mentioned my favorite -- fiberglass reinforced packing tape. A roll (almost a lifetime
    supply) will run you about two bucks. It comes in
    3/4 inch width and can easily be torn to a narrower width. About two passes of this around a rim and
    the problem is solved. I just use an xacto knife to cut the stem hole open. I have NEVER had a
    spoke end flat using this tape.

    Dick Peterson

    "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]
    > says...
    > >
    > >
    > >I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new
    > >to this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?
    >
    > pros - none thtat I can think of cons - your tires will go through the tape and then
    > eventually fail.
    >
    > Get real rim tape. I recommend good old velox cloth rim tape.
    > -----------------
    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  20. B.C. Cletta

    B.C. Cletta Guest

    "I need to re-tape my rims. My friends tell me that electrical tape will work just fine. I'm new to
    this, so I don't know. Can you give me pros and cons?"

    what kinda pressure? i've used strapping tape w/ the MTB & 35-psi but it sucks w/ high pressure
    tire. i'd pass the electical, gaffers & other tapes unless an emergency. you don't know what F'd
    is until you start getting the mystery flats in Fum Buck Nowhere. i'll echo the recomendations
    for Velox & plastic rim bands but if you've on a tight budget or just a cheapskate, a couple of
    wraps of adhesive tape from the drugstore is the only alternative i'd consider.
     
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