rim tool bicycle research

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Mar 10, 2005.

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  2. Vee

    Vee Guest

    Download Ch. 17 of the Barnett's manual (it's free):
    http://www.bbinstitute.com/manual.htm
    Pages 29-31 will tell you about fixing rims.

    In short, the Bicycle Research tool only bends one side of a rim
    inward. The top of the jaws is narrower than the bottom. Also, the
    top of the jaws is designed to brace against the bottom of the braking
    surface, while the top pushes higher up on the other side of the rim.
    As used in the picture, the left side of the rim will be bent inward.
    A crescent wrench will bend a rim outward. It might also leave rough
    spots in the rim, which can be smoothed out with a few passes with a
    file. Most rim repairs can also be accomplished with 2x4's, a rubber
    mallet, and a little creativity.

    -Vee
     
  3. Thanks for the Barnett link!! I didn't copy the rim section when I
    had a hold of a copy via ILLoan. The bike research tool has only one
    position? Not much fun for $40 and the tool's been on the market for?
    Why does the tool exist? There's a warehouse outside portland filled
    withum?
    I was hoping the tool was an miracle worker-pryprypry and ride true.
    My metal working ability distends to knowing to work from the middle
    out, east in the northern hemis.. except when but I can't explain
    that which is where the BR rim tool supposed to enter the picture.
    I firmly believe brownie or hozan's gnomes have one-a small vise fits
    over the rim with a threaded extendable in both directions rod to fit
    into the rim pressing against a vise surface on the outside with a
    threaded hole for a rod from the outside,
    Does this exist?
     
  4. thanks for the barnett link!! i didn't copy the rim section when i
    had a hold of a copy via illoan. the bike research tool has only one
    position? not much fun for $40 and the tool's been on the market for?
    why does the tool exist? there's a warehouse outside portland filled
    withum?
    i was hoping the tool was an miracle worker-pryprypry and ride true.
    my metal working ability distends to knowing to work from the middle
    out, east in the northern hemis.. except when but i can't explain
    that which is where the br rim tool supposed to enter the picture.
    i firmly believe brownie or hozan's gnomes have one-a small vise fits
    over the rim with a threaded extendable in both directions rod to fit
    into the rim pressing against a vise surface on the outside with a
    threaded hole for a rod from the outside,
    does this exist?
     
  5. think of it-squeezing the rim back together without anxiety like with a
    parks chain tool-yawl know sometimes yawl hit it and the other side
    develops beri-beri.
    one factor in it's not exisiting aside from my not having a machine
    shop.
    another is rim sides may differ so much that's it's not feasible
    marketwise.
    and are the people intereted in fooling with such tools-do they buy
    CR-18's or the wonder rims from colorado cyclist? only the intelligent
    LBS knows.
    one chilling factor-if a small machine shop owner came up with an idea
    for producing $$$ from a marketable design
    his second thought might be "why bother" caws the chinese producing
    the $2 adjustable wrench for the world market (singapore LBS) are gonna
    kill your initiative.
     
  6. Vee

    Vee Guest

    >The bike research tool has only one position? Not much fun for $40 and
    >the tool's been on the market for? Why does the tool exist?


    It's designed to fix sloppy seams. As I said before, creatively mix in
    a mallet and some blocks of wood, and you can work miracles. I think
    your idea about a "threaded extendable in both directions rod to fit
    into the rim" is a needlessly complicated surrogate for a block of
    wood.

    -Vee
     
  7. JeffWills

    JeffWills Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > The bike research tool has only one
    > position? Not much fun for $40 and the tool's been on the market for?
    > Why does the tool exist?


    Look at the picture again. It's got three positions. I used to use it
    all the time on steel rims that kids dinged by running into curbs. That
    was back when I worked in a Schwinn shop- lots of steel rims to work
    on.

    > There's a warehouse outside portland filled
    > withum?


    Geez. Look at a map, willya? Ashland's at the opposite end of Oregon
    from Portland. I live in Washington state and I'm 275 miles closer to
    downtown Portland than Ashland.

    Jeff
     
  8. ashland! one of the top ports in the us of a AND! one of the largest
    piles of smoldering tree bark: Portland on the other hand is a real
    sheeetthole!!
    wood-cherry, white oak, rock maple...
    you carve and file wood into small curve shapes to fit into the rim
    side beteeen clincher fold and rim bottom then beat on it till it's
    shapeless?
    the hope was/is someone will spring forward with AN IDEA!
    I had one. take the CR-18, place it between two slabs uh 1 inch
    particle board covered with formica(used desks) and jump up and down
    and the expletive deleted till it goes back into shape with some
    precise bending in between a schoolbus bumper and rad surround.
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > ashland! one of the top ports in the us of a AND! one of the largest
    > piles of smoldering tree bark: Portland on the other hand is a real
    > sheeetthole!!
    > wood-cherry, white oak, rock maple...
    > you carve and file wood into small curve shapes to fit into the rim
    > side beteeen clincher fold and rim bottom then beat on it till it's
    > shapeless?
    > the hope was/is someone will spring forward with AN IDEA!
    > I had one. take the CR-18, place it between two slabs uh 1 inch
    > particle board covered with formica(used desks) and jump up and down
    > and the expletive deleted till it goes back into shape with some
    > precise bending in between a schoolbus bumper and rad surround.


    Why, yes.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Earth (Illinois)
     
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