Rims - which are most reliable

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Steve & Carla, Feb 7, 2003.

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  1. I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?

    I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a 26" rim or even smaller
    (never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).

    Any advice?

    - Steve
     
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  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    First of all, stop hitting things! That'll save you the most $$ in both the short and long term.
    Second, inflate your tires to the proper pressure. Third, stop hitting things! The key to happy road
    riding is to learn to miss the debris in the roadway.

    There is no rim that is significantly more durable when you're talking about hitting things. They're
    not designed for that. The best I can think of are a pair of Torelli Masters, or some Mavic
    MA2/MA40s. Maybe the box section will give a little before self-destructing?

    Anyone else?

    "Steve & Carla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    > getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?
    >
    > I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a
    26"
    > rim or even smaller (never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).
    >
    > Any advice?
    >
    > - Steve
    >
     
  3. I C S

    I C S Guest

    "Steve & Carla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    | getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?
    |
    | I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a
    26"
    | rim or even smaller (never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).
    |
    | Any advice?
    |
    | - Steve
    |
    Sun CR-18 with 36 spokes
     
  4. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    Larger tires, more spokes, and higher tension. New prescrption for eyeglasses.

    On Sat, 08 Feb 2003 02:29:53 GMT, "Steve & Carla" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    >getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?
    >
    >I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a 26" rim or even smaller
    >(never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).
    >
    >Any advice?
    >
    >- Steve
     
  5. Tom Paterson

    Tom Paterson Guest

    >From: "Steve & Carla"

    >I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    >getting expensive.

    >Any advice?

    Bigger tires. Big enough to protect the rim at about 105psi, then you're not riding on rocks.
    Suggest a "real" 23 size, if you've been using nominal (skinny) 20's or whatever. Might need to
    upsize your tubes, too. Use the biggest ones that fit into your tires, printed sizes on tube boxes
    can be misleading.

    There might be some rims that will withstand a hit better than others, but if your tire is sized
    right for your weight and riding conditions you can pretty much get out of the rim-testing business.
    --Tom Paterson
     
  6. Jim Feeley

    Jim Feeley Guest

    > > "Steve & Carla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    > > > getting expensive.

    Mike S. <[email protected]> wrote:

    > First of all, stop hitting things! That'll save you the most $$ in both the short and long term.
    > Second, inflate your tires to the proper pressure. Third, stop hitting things!

    And consider using higher-profile (ie- bigger) tires. Not some tiny 20mm pseudo-sewups. 23mm or even
    25mm tires roll pretty well when inflated correctly.

    I'm 180lbs now and I used to race cyclocross, so my sense of what needs to be avoided in the road
    differs from some track geeks (though I did race track for a couple years too). Anyway, I avoid what
    I can, but when riding in a group/pack, you can't avoid everything. But I still get thousands and
    thousands of miles out of my rear rims.

    Steve, what sort of stuff are you hitting? What tires are you riding? What do you weigh?

    Jim
     
  7. On Fri, 07 Feb 2003 21:29:53 -0500, Steve & Carla wrote:

    > I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    > getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?
    >
    > I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a 26" rim or even smaller
    > (never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).

    Well, no, no one guarantees rims that I know of. But I see no reason why 700c rims would be more
    susceptable to damage than 20" rims. In fact, with their greater curvature, I'd think they'd be more
    likely to get damaged, since a potlhole can catch it more readily.

    I have had very good results with Mavic rims. I weigh about 200lbs, and have for years (sigh). I
    don't go out of my way to hit things, but I don't avoid rough roads or gravel, either.

    Keep your tires inflated to the right pressure, and don't run over every pothole you see, like
    the man said.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and _`\(,_ | Excellence. (_)/ (_) |
     
  8. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Steve who? writes:

    > I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    > getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?

    It's not riding off curbs, or stairs for that matter, that ruin rims. It's riding into curbs or
    angular objects with:

    1. too small a cross section tire,
    2. insufficient inflation pressure
    3. overweight rider
    4. clumsy bicycle handling

    > I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a 26" rim or even smaller
    > (never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).

    You cannot expect a rim to survive bottoming on an obstacle or even on a flat road. All aluminum
    rims have nearly the same bead-hook and sidewall. Therefore, choice of rim has no effect. Explaining
    the circumstances under which you destroy rims would help, both because readers might recognize a
    solution and because describing it in writing might help you recognize the answer yourself.

    When did you start riding bicycles?

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  9. Steve

    Steve Guest

    I don't remember having problems when I weighed 165, but now that I am 200# there seems to be a
    correlation tor im failure.

    The first rim problem was on a Trek 1420 after a bike shop retentioned (tightened up) the spokes
    on a matrix rim, which I later heard was a defective rim. This rim had numerous cracks in the
    sides of the rim.

    Second rim failure was riding over a piece of plastic or a road flare. This ripped a spoke out
    of the rim.

    Third rim was 3 spokes pulling thru the rim.

    Lastest problem was running over a rock on a night ride.

    - Steve

    "Jim Feeley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:070220032125016359%[email protected]...
    >
    > > > "Steve & Carla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not
    jumping
    > > > > off curbs). This is getting expensive.
    >
    > Mike S. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > First of all, stop hitting things! That'll save you the most $$ in both
    the
    > > short and long term. Second, inflate your tires to the proper pressure. Third, stop hitting
    > > things!
    >
    > And consider using higher-profile (ie- bigger) tires. Not some tiny 20mm pseudo-sewups. 23mm or
    > even 25mm tires roll pretty well when inflated correctly.
    >
    > I'm 180lbs now and I used to race cyclocross, so my sense of what needs to be avoided in the road
    > differs from some track geeks (though I did race track for a couple years too). Anyway, I avoid
    > what I can, but when riding in a group/pack, you can't avoid everything. But I still get thousands
    > and thousands of miles out of my rear rims.
    >
    > Steve, what sort of stuff are you hitting? What tires are you riding? What do you weigh?
    >
    > Jim
     
  10. John Albergo

    John Albergo Guest

    Jim Feeley wrote:

    >And consider using higher-profile (ie- bigger) tires. Not some tiny 20mm pseudo-sewups. 23mm or
    >even 25mm tires roll pretty well when inflated correctly.
    >

    32mm roll ok too :)
     
  11. Dianne_1234

    Dianne_1234 Guest

    Hi Steve, my sugggestions below:

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<%[email protected]>...
    > I don't remember having problems when I weighed 165, but now that I am 200# there seems to be a
    > correlation tor im failure.
    >
    > The first rim problem was on a Trek 1420 after a bike shop retentioned (tightened up) the spokes
    > on a matrix rim, which I later heard was a defective rim. This rim had numerous cracks in the
    > sides of the rim.

    A rim made with thicker walls or a stronger alloy will help this problem.

    > Second rim failure was riding over a piece of plastic or a road flare. This ripped a spoke out of
    > the rim.

    A rim made with thicker walls or a stronger alloy will help this problem.

    But how often do you anticipate incidents like this? Very few rims would survive that in my
    experience.

    > Third rim was 3 spokes pulling thru the rim.

    A rim made with thicker walls or a stronger alloy will help this problem.

    > Lastest problem was running over a rock on a night ride.

    As others have suggested, avoiding the obstacle (tough to do some times, especially at night) is a
    good solution. Bigger tires and higher inflation pressures are also good solutions.

    > - Steve

    Anyone have specific rim models that have thicker spoke walls or a stronger alloy?
     
  12. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    Doesn't Rivendell make some kinda huge tire? The Roly-Poly or something like that??

    Won't help for ripping out spokes, but if you run over something, it may help.

    "Tom Paterson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >From: "Steve & Carla"
    >
    > >I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    > >getting expensive.
    >
    > >Any advice?
    >
    > Bigger tires. Big enough to protect the rim at about 105psi, then you're
    not
    > riding on rocks. Suggest a "real" 23 size, if you've been using nominal (skinny) 20's or whatever.
    > Might need to upsize your tubes, too. Use the biggest ones that fit into your tires, printed sizes
    > on tube boxes can be misleading.
    >
    > There might be some rims that will withstand a hit better than others, but
    if
    > your tire is sized right for your weight and riding conditions you can
    pretty
    > much get out of the rim-testing business. --Tom Paterson
     
  13. David Ornee

    David Ornee Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Steve who? writes:
    >
    > > I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    > > getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?
    >
    > It's not riding off curbs, or stairs for that matter, that ruin rims. It's riding into curbs or
    > angular objects with:
    >
    > 1. too small a cross section tire,
    > 2. insufficient inflation pressure
    > 3. overweight rider
    > 4. clumsy bicycle handling
    >
    > > I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a 26" rim or even smaller
    > > (never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).
    >
    > You cannot expect a rim to survive bottoming on an obstacle or even on a flat road. All aluminum
    > rims have nearly the same bead-hook and sidewall. Therefore, choice of rim has no effect.
    > Explaining the circumstances under which you destroy rims would help, both because readers might
    > recognize a solution and because describing it in writing might help you recognize the answer
    > yourself.
    >
    > When did you start riding bicycles?
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA

    Steve,

    Night riding can be a challenge to see and avoid all obstacles that can cause damage. I suggest you
    consider the following:
    1. A quality shock absorbing seat post (or always ride with your seat unweighted) (are you carrying
    panniers or other dead weight?)
    2. Bontrager Fairlane OSB rim (reasonably priced, wider, heavier, and more durable) You will get a
    little additional margin of vertical deflection before bottoming out if the tire side wall are
    closer to parallel to rim walls.
    3. Put the largest cross section tire you can fit.
    4. Keep inflated to maximum recommended pressure. (carry and use a pump like Topeak Morph)
    5. More lighting to help spot obstacles

    David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
     
  14. Klydesdale

    Klydesdale Guest

    "David Ornee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Steve,
    >
    > Night riding can be a challenge to see and avoid all obstacles that can cause damage. I suggest
    > you consider the following:
    > 1. A quality shock absorbing seat post (or always ride with your seat unweighted) (are you
    > carrying panniers or other dead weight?)
    > 2. Bontrager Fairlane OSB rim (reasonably priced, wider, heavier, and
    more
    > durable) You will get a little additional margin of vertical deflection before bottoming out if
    > the tire side wall are closer to parallel to rim walls.
    > 3. Put the largest cross section tire you can fit.

    The Bontrager Fairlane used the same extrusion as the Bontrager Corvair (26" MTB) but rolled into a
    700c hoop. While both these rims are indeed reasonably priced and pretty durable, at 22mm wide
    they're certainly not as wide (or as heavy) as the 27.5mm Sun Rhyno Lite the original poster
    mentioned.
     
  15. Dvt

    Dvt Guest

    Steve wrote...
    > This rim had numerous cracks in the sides of the rim.
    >
    > Second rim failure... ripped a spoke out of the rim.
    >
    > Third rim was 3 spokes pulling thru the rim.
    >
    > Lastest problem was running over a rock on a night ride.

    None of the first three problems sound like they were caused by impacts or misuse. Spokes pulling
    through the rim imply a problem with the wheelbuild (tension too high for a given rim) or faulty
    rims. Some might say that *any* rim that doesn't allow near-taco tension is faulty, but let's save
    that for another thread.

    Cracks in the sides of the rim? Either the rim was very well worn from braking or it was a
    really poor rim.

    So I'd agree with the consensus. At 200 lbs, you don't need anything special unless you're really
    pounding these wheels hard (i.e. jumping on and off curbs). Get a good wheelbuilder to build a solid
    wheel using 32 or 36 butted spokes and you'll probably get good service from the wheels.

    Dave dvt at psu dot edu
     
  16. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Dave VT? writes:

    >> This rim had numerous cracks in the sides of the rim.

    >> Second rim failure... ripped a spoke out of the rim.

    >> Third rim was 3 spokes pulling thru the rim.

    >> Latest problem was running over a rock on a night ride.

    > None of the first three problems sound like they were caused by impacts or misuse. Spokes pulling
    > through the rim imply a problem with the wheelbuild (tension too high for a given rim) or faulty
    > rims. Some might say that *any* rim that doesn't allow near-taco tension is faulty, but let's save
    > that for another thread.

    > Cracks in the sides of the rim? Either the rim was very well worn from braking or it was a really
    > poor rim.

    > So I'd agree with the consensus. At 200 lbs, you don't need anything special unless you're really
    > pounding these wheels hard
    > (i.e. jumping on and off curbs). Get a good wheelbuilder to build a solid wheel using 32 or 36
    > butted spokes and you'll probably get good service from the wheels.

    Failures 1-3 are caused by fatigue, not sudden overload such as the one suggested of jumping off
    curbs and the like. Fatigue failures are accelerated by larger cyclic loading, both more wheel
    rotations and greater load. Therefore, thiner spokes would make a difference by reducing peak load
    changes. I'm not considering the rims involved because good rims ate hard to find these days, most
    being anodized and having only eyelets rather than double wall spoke sockets. DT Revolution spokes,
    in spite of greater difficulty of tensioning and truing, would most likely material lengthen life of
    these same rims.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  17. crazy6r54

    crazy6r54 Guest

    That Sun CR 18 isn't that great,spoke breaker. The one I like and I've rode in the dirt is a Araya
    PX- 645 laced to a Shimano FH RM 10 hub with a 700x38c tire. It has out lasted my Sun CR 18 100 %.
    It even took a hit at 27 mph that put a 2 inch sq hole in the tire. Don't know what it hit but it
    was heavy sanded and full of metal and glass. Once I picked up the end of a road flare with spike
    and had to the rim.

    Fire up MTB 03
     
  18. I C S

    I C S Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | That Sun CR 18 isn't that great,spoke breaker. The one I like and I've rode in the
    | dirt is a Araya PX- 645 laced to a Shimano FH RM 10 hub with a 700x38c tire. It
    | has out lasted my Sun CR 18 100 %. It even took a hit at 27 mph that put a 2 inch
    | sq hole in the tire. Don't know what it hit but it was heavy sanded and full of
    | metal and glass. Once I picked up the end of a road flare with spike and had to
    | the rim.
    |
    | Fire up MTB 03
    |

    The rims has nothing to do with spoke breakage. Spoke breakage is more the result of an incorrectly
    built wheel. I have a pair of CR-18's with over 10,000 miles on them. And I'm talking miles with a
    heavy rider and touring weight as well. Just use enough spokes (36 or more), quality components, and
    get the wheel built properly.
     
  19. dvt wrote:
    > Steve wrote...
    >
    >>This rim had numerous cracks in the sides of the rim.
    >>
    >>Second rim failure... ripped a spoke out of the rim.
    >>
    >>Third rim was 3 spokes pulling thru the rim.
    >>
    >>Lastest problem was running over a rock on a night ride.
    >
    >
    > None of the first three problems sound like they were caused by impacts or misuse. Spokes pulling
    > through the rim imply a problem with the wheelbuild (tension too high for a given rim) or faulty
    > rims. Some might say that *any* rim that doesn't allow near-taco tension is faulty, but let's save
    > that for another thread.

    Spokes pulling through is often attributed to high static tension - but is that really the biggest
    factor? It is true that high mean tensions can decrease fatigue life, but it is just one of many
    factors that affect fatigue life (magnitude of the cyclic tension, stress concentrations, surface
    treatments and condition, material flaws, etc.). So the question is, how significant really is the
    magnitude of static tension in rim cracks? Is it a small enough factor that the benefits of high
    static tension outweigh the possible decrease in rim fatigue life?

    Mark McMaster [email protected]
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >I'm damaging rear 700cc rims every time I hit something hard (not jumping off curbs). This is
    >getting expensive. Does anyone guarantee rims?

    No one will guarantee a rim against this type of damage.
    >
    >I've tried Mavic and Sun including Ryno-lite. Thinking about going to a 26" rim or even smaller
    >(never a problem with Bike Friday 20" rims).

    You should be thinking of getting fatter tires, not new rims.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
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