Risk Factors Website

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Brad Sheppard, May 17, 2004.

  1. I may be creating a CAD risk factors website since I can't
    find in one source ALL risk factors and their details. EG -
    Hba1c predicts CAD better than Chol. Also, sensitivy of BP
    to salt predicts CAD. A biggie - abstaining from alcohol is
    a big risk factor. The details I include would be links to
    the original research or websites. What is your ranking of
    risk factors in terms of predictive power?
     
    Tags:


  2. Brad Sheppard wrote:

    > I may be creating a CAD risk factors website since I can't
    > find in one source ALL risk factors and their details.

    It seems you are not looking hard enough.

    > EG - Hba1c predicts CAD better than Chol.

    Elevated HgbA1C (ie diabetes) is risk equivalent rather than
    a risk factor.

    > Also, sensitivy of BP to salt predicts CAD.

    Hypertension us a risk factor for CAD.

    > A biggie - abstaining from alcohol is a big risk factor.

    Not really. There are folks who have higher CAD risk from
    drinking alcohol.

    > The details I include would be links to the original
    > research or websites.

    It seems you have difficulties interpreting the information
    correctly.

    > What is your ranking of risk factors in terms of
    > predictive power?

    (1) Cigarette smoking.
    (2) Family history
    (3) Metabolic syndrome (MetS)
    (4) Hypertension
    (5) Dyslipidemia
    (6) Age over 35 yo
    (7) Male gender

    Elevated HgbA1C (ie diabetes) is not a risk factor but a
    risk equivalent.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  3. Fresh~Horses

    Fresh~Horses Guest

    [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I may be creating a CAD risk factors website since I can't
    > find in one source ALL risk factors and their details. EG
    > - Hba1c predicts CAD better than Chol. Also, sensitivy of
    > BP to salt predicts CAD. A biggie - abstaining from
    > alcohol is a big risk factor. The details I include would
    > be links to the original research or websites. What is
    > your ranking of risk factors in terms of predictive power?

    This sounds like a great idea Brad. My entry for most
    important risk factor would be low hdl. This week.

    Next week? Who knows.

    According to the latest research, CRP and homocysteine are
    no longer favoured front-runners, and I heard a rumour last
    week that HDL is set for a fall.

    As for high cholesterol as an independent risk factor, here
    are my numbers, with no heart disease: Total cholesterol 9.4-
    12.59, ldl
    7.28-11.31.

    I think it would be great too if you included this. Heh. (I
    was just hoping for an excuse to post it here. We could use
    a little levity on this board. Hope you don't mind.)

    http://www.etch-a-sketch.com/html/onlineetch.htm

    Zee
     
  4. To clarify:

    for men, Hba1c predicts mortality and CAD better than chol,
    even for non-diabetics. See
    http://vanderbiltowc.wellsource.com/dh/content.asp?ID=621
    and for the journal article, see
    http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abridged/322/7277/15

    Re:sensitivy of BP to salt predicts CAD - I should have
    added "even for people with normal BP." Didn't know that,
    did you Chung?

    Re: abstainance from alcohol as a risk factor add - versus
    moderate drinking. Beyond moderate drinking increases risk.
    "But far more Americans drink less, not more, than would be
    most healthful for them. To fail to inform these patients
    about the benefits of moderate drinking is both
    counterproductive and dishonest. Physicians may ask, "How
    much alcohol do you drink," "Is there any reason that you
    don't drink (or that you drink so little)," and (to those
    without religious objections, previous drinking problems,
    etc.), "Do you know that one or two glasses of wine or beer
    a day can be good for your health if you can safely consume
    them?"
    http://www.acsh.org/publications/priorities/0801/pcyes.html

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Brad Sheppard wrote:
    >
    > > I may be creating a CAD risk factors website since I
    > > can't find in one source ALL risk factors and their
    > > details.
    >
    > It seems you are not looking hard enough.
    >
    > > EG - Hba1c predicts CAD better than Chol.
    >
    > Elevated HgbA1C (ie diabetes) is risk equivalent rather
    > than a risk factor.
    >
    > > Also, sensitivy of BP to salt predicts CAD.
    >
    > Hypertension us a risk factor for CAD.
    >
    > > A biggie - abstaining from alcohol is a big risk
    > > factor.
    >
    > Not really. There are folks who have higher CAD risk from
    > drinking alcohol.
    >
    > > The details I include would be links to the original
    > > research or websites.
    >
    > It seems you have difficulties interpreting the
    > information correctly.
    >
    > > What is your ranking of risk factors in terms of
    > > predictive power?
    >
    > (1) Cigarette smoking.
    > (2) Family history
    > (3) Metabolic syndrome (MetS)
    > (4) Hypertension
    > (5) Dyslipidemia
    > (6) Age over 35 yo
    > (7) Male gender
    >
    > Elevated HgbA1C (ie diabetes) is not a risk factor but a
    > risk equivalent.
    >
    >
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/
    >
    > ** Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048
    >
    > What is all this about?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48
    >
    > Is this spam? http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  5. Brad Sheppard wrote:

    > To clarify:
    >
    > for men, Hba1c predicts mortality and CAD better than
    > chol, even for non-diabetics. See
    > http://vanderbiltowc.wellsource.com/dh/content.asp?ID=621
    > and for the journal article, see http://bmj.bmjjournals.c-
    > om/cgi/content/abridged/322/7277/15

    Those folks with higher than optimal HgbA1C likely have more
    CAD because of their having metabolic syndrome (MetS). The
    HgbA1C is simply a marker of MetS rather than an independent
    risk factor.

    >
    > Re:sensitivy of BP to salt predicts CAD - I should have
    > added "even for people with normal BP." Didn't know that,
    > did you Chung?
    >

    Saline infusion leading to the demonstration of salt
    sensitivity is the most sensitive test for detecting
    hypertension. Didn't know that, did you Shep?

    >
    > Re: abstainance from alcohol as a risk factor add - versus
    > moderate drinking. Beyond moderate drinking increases
    > risk. "But far more Americans drink less, not more, than
    > would be most healthful for them. To fail to inform these
    > patients about the benefits of moderate drinking is both
    > counterproductive and dishonest. Physicians may ask, "How
    > much alcohol do you drink," "Is there any reason that you
    > don't drink (or that you drink so little)," and (to those
    > without religious objections, previous drinking problems,
    > etc.), "Do you know that one or two glasses of wine or
    > beer a day can be good for your health if you can safely
    > consume them?" http://www.acsh.org/publications/prioritie-
    > s/0801/pcyes.html
    >

    In truth, there have been no randomized double-blind placebo
    controlled prospective trials to show a health benefit from
    consuming alcoholic beverages.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  6. Lictor

    Lictor Guest

    "Brad Sheppard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Re: abstainance from alcohol as a risk factor add - versus
    > moderate drinking. Beyond moderate drinking increases
    > risk. "But far more Americans drink less, not more, than
    > would be most healthful for them. To fail to inform these
    > patients about the benefits of moderate drinking is both
    > counterproductive and dishonest.

    The "one glass of red wine a day" (two at most, for men) has
    been the standard advice from doctors, especially to old
    people, for ages in France. It has a positive effect on
    cholesterol and overall heart health. It's also a relaxant,
    which can relieve stress. It's slightly anti-depressant, and
    depression is a real issue among old people. I guess it also
    helps the "industry". You have tons of corn syrup to get rid
    of, we have tons of wine. :p
     
  7. Jim Chinnis

    Jim Chinnis Guest

    "Lictor" <[email protected]> wrote in part:

    >You have tons of corn syrup to get rid of, we have
    >tons of wine.

    Care to swap some? ;-)
    --
    Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA
     
  8. There is no single marker for MetS, nor is it a continuous
    variable like Hba1c. More fundamental than either Mets or
    Hba1c appears to be IRS - insulin resistance syndrome. This
    appears to precede MetS by many years. The body pumps out
    more insulin as the cells become more and more insulin
    resistant. The excess insulin is harmful. Unfortunately,
    there is currently no simple test for IRS.

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Brad Sheppard wrote:
    >
    > > To clarify:
    > >
    > > for men, Hba1c predicts mortality and CAD better than
    > > chol, even for non-diabetics. See http://vanderbiltowc.-
    > > wellsource.com/dh/content.asp?ID=621 and for the journal
    > > article, see http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abr-
    > > idged/322/7277/15
    >
    > Those folks with higher than optimal HgbA1C likely have
    > more CAD because of their having metabolic syndrome
    > (MetS). The HgbA1C is simply a marker of MetS rather than
    > an independent risk factor.
    >
    > >
    > > Re:sensitivy of BP to salt predicts CAD - I should have
    > > added "even for people with normal BP." Didn't know
    > > that, did you Chung?
    > >
    >
    > Saline infusion leading to the demonstration of salt
    > sensitivity is the most sensitive test for detecting
    > hypertension. Didn't know that, did you Shep?
    >
    > >
    > > Re: abstainance from alcohol as a risk factor add -
    > > versus moderate drinking. Beyond moderate drinking
    > > increases risk. "But far more Americans drink less, not
    > > more, than would be most healthful for them. To fail to
    > > inform these patients about the benefits of moderate
    > > drinking is both counterproductive and dishonest.
    > > Physicians may ask, "How much alcohol do you drink," "Is
    > > there any reason that you don't drink (or that you drink
    > > so little)," and (to those without religious objections,
    > > previous drinking problems, etc.), "Do you know that one
    > > or two glasses of wine or beer a day can be good for
    > > your health if you can safely consume them?" http://www-
    > > .acsh.org/publications/priorities/0801/pcyes.html
    > >
    >
    > In truth, there have been no randomized double-blind
    > placebo controlled prospective trials to show a health
    > benefit from consuming alcoholic beverages.
    >
    >
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/
    >
    > ** Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048
    >
    > What is all this about?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48
    >
    > Is this spam? http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  9. Brad Sheppard wrote:

    > There is no single marker for MetS,

    Did not claim that there was.

    > nor is it a continuous variable like Hba1c.

    It is a diagnosis.

    > More fundamental than either Mets or Hba1c appears to be
    > IRS - insulin resistance syndrome.

    MetS is fundamentally more important than either IRS
    or HgbA1C.

    > This appears to precede MetS by many years.

    Ime, MetS precedes IRS by several years.

    > The body pumps out more insulin as the cells become more
    > and more insulin resistant. The excess insulin is harmful.
    > Unfortunately, there is currently no simple test for IRS.
    >

    Clinically, MetS is more important than IRS.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?R20632B48

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  10. Mirek Fidler

    Mirek Fidler Guest

    "Brad Sheppard" <[email protected]> píse v diskusním príspevku
    news:[email protected]...
    > I may be creating a CAD risk factors website since I can't
    > find in one source ALL risk factors and their details. EG
    > - Hba1c predicts CAD better than Chol. Also, sensitivy of
    > BP to salt predicts CAD. A biggie - abstaining from
    > alcohol is a big risk factor. The details I include would
    > be links to the original research or websites. What is
    > your ranking of risk factors in terms of predictive power?

    Speaking about it, are there any studies associating
    climate with CAD?

    Mirek
     
  11. Yes. "Mar 12 (Reuters Health) - In a study of older
    women, a cold outdoor temperature at the time they were
    born was associated with an increased risk of heart
    disease later in life.

    The findings, which are reported in the medical journal
    Heart, stem from a study of 4286 women, between 60 and 79
    years of age, who were randomly selected from general
    physician lists in 23 British towns."

    http://www.heartcenteronline.com/myheartdr/home/research-
    detail.cfm?reutersid=4207

    "Mirek Fidler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    berlin.de>...
    > "Brad Sheppard" <[email protected]> píse v
    > diskusním príspevku
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I may be creating a CAD risk factors website since I
    > > can't find in one source ALL risk factors and their
    > > details. EG - Hba1c predicts CAD better than Chol. Also,
    > > sensitivy of BP to salt predicts CAD. A biggie -
    > > abstaining from alcohol is a big risk factor. The
    > > details I include would be links to the original
    > > research or websites. What is your ranking of risk
    > > factors in terms of predictive power?
    >
    > Speaking about it, are there any studies associating
    > climate with CAD?
    >
    > Mirek
     
  12. Mirek Fidler

    Mirek Fidler Guest

    "Brad Sheppard" <[email protected]> píse v diskusním príspevku
    news:[email protected]...
    > Yes. "Mar 12 (Reuters Health) - In a study of older women,
    > a cold outdoor temperature at the time they were born was
    > associated with an increased risk of heart disease later
    > in life.

    Much more interesting than I have expected.....

    Mirek
     
Loading...