Ritchey Zero system rear wheel

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by cliff, May 28, 2004.

  1. cliff

    cliff New Member

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    The Ritchey Zero system rear wheel attempts to even spoke tension by using an offset drilled rim with a hub that has narrower flange spacing: the right flange is significantly further inboard compared to a shimano hub. The drive side and non-drive side spokes are indeed closer in tension than a "standard" wheel, but the spoke "bracing angle" is reduced on the left.

    Given two wheels with the same spoke count, same spoke guage and crossing pattern, and equal drive side tension, which wheel is stronger, the Ritchey with the narrow flanges and more even spoke tension, or the standard wheel with a greater "bracing angle" due to the wider flange seperation?

    Cliff
     
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  2. Lan Support

    Lan Support Guest

    My experience with the Ritchey offset rims is that they
    crack around the spoke holes after only a few months of
    use. I've had no such problems with the Velocity Aerohead
    offset rims.

    Nick

    "cliff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The Ritchey Zero system rear wheel attempts to even spoke
    > tension by using
    an offset drilled rim with a hub that has narrower flange
    spacing: the right flange is significantly further inboard
    compared to a shimano hub. The drive side and non-drive side
    spokes are indeed closer in tension than a "standard" wheel,
    but the spoke "bracing angle" is reduced on the left.
    >
    > Given two wheels with the same spoke count, same spoke
    > guage and crossing pattern, and equal drive side tension,
    > which wheel is stronger, the Ritchey with the narrow
    > flanges and more even spoke tension, or the standard wheel
    > with a greater "bracing angle" due to the wider flange
    > seperation?
     
  3. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Mon, 31 May 2004 10:26:44 +1000, "LAN Support" <[email protected]>
    scribbled:

    >My experience with the Ritchey offset rims is that they
    >crack around the spoke holes after only a few months of
    >use. I've had no such problems with the Velocity Aerohead
    >offset rims.
    >
    >Nick

    I've been using a set of OEM'd Ritchey "Rock Comp" OCR
    wheels on my bike since June '02, put about 2600 miles on
    them on all kinds of terrain and they seem to be holding up
    pretty good. Occasionally get whacked out of true a little,
    but I've so far been able to keep 'em relatively straight
    with some spoke wrenching. No cracking yet, though now
    having said it...

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"
    -The Onion
     
  4. Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Mon, 31 May 2004 10:26:44 +1000, "LAN Support"
    > <[email protected]> scribbled:
    >
    > >My experience with the Ritchey offset rims is that they
    > >crack around the spoke holes after only a few months of
    > >use. I've had no such problems with the Velocity Aerohead
    > >offset rims.
    > >
    > >Nick
    >
    > I've been using a set of OEM'd Ritchey "Rock Comp" OCR
    > wheels on my bike since June '02, put about 2600 miles on
    > them on all kinds of terrain and they seem to be holding
    > up pretty good. Occasionally get whacked out of true a
    > little, but I've so far been able to keep 'em relatively
    > straight with some spoke wrenching. No cracking yet,
    > though now having said it...
    >
    > -Slash

    Why doesn't someone try to answer the question which is to
    do with wheel strength and not the relative durability of
    different rim brands?

    Nigel Grinter
     
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