Road Bike Buying Advice Needed

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jonson McMurty, Feb 19, 2003.

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  1. Hi all - I'm looking into buying a road bike (right now just have a Fisher Tassajara MTB bike but
    don't really get as much a chance to hit trails as I'd like) and mainly use it for distance rides
    (century rides, maybe some bike tours). I'm pretty much a complete beginner, but I'd like to buy
    something that I won't have to replace for a number of years. I went to a store and checked out the
    Klein Q-Pro Carbon - which is at the top end of my price range (quoted at $2300) and that definitely
    seemed to be a strong contender. I was also looking at a Kestrel Talon - not really sure how to pick
    with all the bikes on the market. I most likely won't do any racing but I plan on riding a good bit
    (will shoot for 4 to 5 rides a week when the snow is off the ground) and I'd like to get into
    distance riding. Any advice/resources to look at? Comparisons between the Kestrel and the Klein?

    Thanks a lot.
     
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  2. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >I'm pretty much a complete beginner, but I'd like to buy something that I won't have to replace for
    >a number of years.

    I recommend starting with something less expensive. It is likely that in a short while on the road
    you will have a better idea of what you really want to do and also have a better idea of what good
    fit is about.

    Trying to choose a bike for the next 5 years is far more difficult than trying to choose a bike
    which will address your current needs and in fact it is likely that the bike which will serve your
    needs in 5 years may be different than what you need today. Switching from an MTB to a road bike
    will probably take quite a while. What seems comfortable in a road bike to you right now will most
    likely change.

    Add the fact that spending $2300 on a bike won't buy you very much more than $1000 will and may buy
    you less in many ways. For $1000 you can buy a decent frame with 105/Ultegra or Campy equivilents.
    For example if you want to really do touring, you will find that your money would be better spent on
    something like a Trek 520.

    Some things to consider are tire clearance, ability to mount fenders and racks and gearing. These
    are not the things that make a bike flashy, these are things that can make a bike a great ride.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  3. Thanks for the reply - besides the Trek, are there other beginner/mid-range road bikes you would
    recommend?
     
  4. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Jonson McMurty) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Thanks for the reply - besides the Trek, are there other beginner/mid-range road bikes you would
    > recommend?

    At that price range, there's not much technical difference between brands, as long as you stick to
    reputable bike shops (no Walmart etc.). In fact, every single bike you see will probably have a
    Taiwanese or Chinese frame and Japanese components. Many of these bikes will be identical in every
    way except for the stickers. Buy something that fits you from a shop that gives you good service.

    Ken
     
  5. TREK has a full line of bikes in all price ranges, from the 1000 at $550 on up to what Lance rides
    (a $4300 5900). What you need to do is find a shop that can help you get comfortably fit and let you
    ride a few to see what *you* feel is worth the money. The differences between a $900 TREK 1200 and a
    $2500 TREK 5200 aren't as big, in my opinion, as the differences between that $900 bike and an
    entry-level model... however, even a novice will notice them. You need to figure out what's worth
    spending money on and, as long as you've been educated appropriately, it's a decision that others
    can't make for you.

    You might take a look at an article on our website about what to look for while test-riding road
    bikes. It can be found at http://www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm

    You don't have to spend $2500 to get a very nice bike! But you also don't have to worry about not
    being "worthy" of a bike that nice, if that's what you want. The most important things are going to
    be finding a shop that will get you properly fit to the bike and finding enough time to ride it! The
    right bike for you is the one you want to get out and ride, every time you look at it.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Jonson McMurty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks for the reply - besides the Trek, are there other beginner/mid-range road bikes you would
    > recommend?
     
  6. On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 18:51:06 -0500, Ken wrote:

    > [email protected] (Jonson McMurty) wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Thanks for the reply - besides the Trek, are there other beginner/mid-range road bikes you would
    >> recommend?
    >
    > At that price range, there's not much technical difference between brands, as long as you stick to
    > reputable bike shops (no Walmart etc.). In fact, every single bike you see will probably have a
    > Taiwanese or Chinese frame and Japanese components. Many of these bikes will be identical in every
    > way except for the stickers. Buy something that fits you from a shop that gives you good service.

    If you're willing to go a few hundred higher, you can get a bicycle with all Japanese components, a
    Japanese-made lugged steel frame, geometry perfectly suited to very long distance rides and
    clearance for >28mm tires with fenders. I'm speaking of the new Rivendell Romulus. They'll be
    available mail order from Rivendell soon, and also from a handful of great bike shops. This one's
    not going to be a clone except for the stickers, believe me.
     
  7. Smokey

    Smokey Guest

    [email protected] (Jonson McMurty) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi all - I'm looking into buying a road bike (right now just have a Fisher Tassajara MTB bike but
    > don't really get as much a chance to hit trails as I'd like) and mainly use it for distance rides
    > (century rides, maybe some bike tours). I'm pretty much a complete beginner, but I'd like to buy
    > something that I won't have to replace for a number of years. I went to a store and checked out
    > the Klein Q-Pro Carbon - which is at the top end of my price range (quoted at $2300) and that
    > definitely seemed to be a strong contender. I was also looking at a Kestrel Talon - not really
    > sure how to pick with all the bikes on the market. I most likely won't do any racing but I plan on
    > riding a good bit (will shoot for 4 to 5 rides a week when the snow is off the ground) and I'd
    > like to get into distance riding. Any advice/resources to look at? Comparisons between the Kestrel
    > and the Klein?
    >
    > Thanks a lot.

    i agree with the other posters, you can get a lot of bike for around a grand. another option if
    you want an all-purpose bike is a cyclocross bike. they have plenty of clearance for larger tires,
    and many can be outfitted for touring pretty easily. i also agree that a good dealer is more
    important than the brand of bike. if you have a good source, you might want to add lemond bikes to
    your list, especially if you are tall. greg's bikes have a longer top tube that gives big riders
    more room. smokey
     
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