Road Bike for fat men?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Snoopy572, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. Snoopy572

    Snoopy572 New Member

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    I posted this in another forum, but thought I'd get a better response here:



    Join Date: Mar 2006
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    [​IMG] Got to lose weight and need a bike
    Well, I hate running and walking, but really enjoy riding my stationary bike. So, I thought I would mix the enjoyment of the outside with the enjoyment of riding a bike. Now, I need a bike. I went to a store today and they showed me a TRek for $695, that's definitely more than I wanted to spend. Do I need to take special considerations since Im so big? I weigh close to if not over 300lbs and I'm about 5'11-6'. What can I look for on Ebay that will fit the bill? I mainly just want to go on paved bike trails for now and after I get in shape and the weight starts to come off I'f like to mountain bike and maybe even do some amateur road competitions, charity events, or whatever.
    Please help me out and at least give me some models to check out. I'd like to spend as little as possible, but am working between $350-$500, but I really want to stay around $200... hehe.
    Thanks! I'm going to start reading posts to educate myself now.
     
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  2. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    I suggest a used Trek 520 or Cannondale T800.
    They are both road touring and suitable for paved trail riding for large people.
     
  3. RickF

    RickF New Member

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    I was only 262 at my peak weight, but I am very happy with my Specalized Crossroads. It requires more work to ride on roads than a true road bike, but I felt much more secure on the wider tires and with the upright position of the hybrid. The Trek 7200 is similar, and a little less expensive. At my weight, I would not pay a dime extra for any weight savings. I have already lost as much weight (32 pounds so far) as an inexpensive bike, and I am working on losing another 55 pounds.

    As I lose more weight and become more comfortable with my riding ability, I might by a road bike in addition to the hybrid. I will keep the Crossroads for off road use. We have many greenways and rails-to-trails in our area that are well maintained, but not paved. They are not really suitable for a road bike, but perfect for the hybrid.
     
  4. Lawguy661

    Lawguy661 New Member

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    Okay. . . the suggestion I am about to make will definately ruffle some feathers around here. . . but here goes anyway. If I were you, I would go look at and ride an Electra Towney. My dad, he's 61, bought a Towney for exercise and loves it. It's certainly not a "performance" bike, but it is comfortable, well built, and relatively inexpensive (sub $500). You can also get one with the Shimano Nexus system, which changes the gears in the hub (i.e. no derailers).
     
  5. scorpionryder

    scorpionryder New Member

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    I looked at a Kona Smoke when I was shopping for a conditioning/commuter bike.

    Might fit the bill at $399.

    You'll drop the weight fast if you keep at it and watch your diet.

    good luck!
     
  6. Snoopy572

    Snoopy572 New Member

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    Thanks for the replies so far. I'm a young guy, 20, and just need to get my life right before it's too late ya know? So many replies and recommendations. I wish it were as easy as going to Walmart to pick up something, but I know tha is never the case.
    I've got some reading to do before I make a decision, but want to buy something quickly.
     
  7. Sevenrider

    Sevenrider New Member

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    In 1993 iwas almost 300lb @ 6'3. I joined the local Y and kept using the staitinary bike.When it got nice out I bought a GT mountian bike and started riding outside. I now have 4 bikes my weight goes from 225 to 250lb depending on the time of year and how good a diet I follow.
    The nice thing about a Mt. bike is with a set of slick tires you can road cycle knoby tires are good for dirt roads and paths.Its a cheep way to get into cycling to see if you like it. Good luck Mark
     
  8. JTE83

    JTE83 Member

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    Any road bike less than $600 is gonna be crappy. Road bikes are expensive, and good ones like the Giant OCR 1 are around $950.

    If you can't afford a decent road bike then a hybrid should be good. There are good ones around $500 like the Fuji Silhouette.
     
  9. ksteede

    ksteede New Member

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    I agree with Sevenrider. Get an inexpensive mountain bike with a set of slick tires. It will last you a long time and you can always use it for fun rides. (I still use my 14 year old mountain bike for riding with the kids). You will also find the upright position much more comfortable.

    I would not spend monely on a road bike until you could afford a good one, and you know a lot more about cycling to have an idea about what you want and what would last a long time. Road bikes are too expensive to experiment with.
     
  10. Snoopy572

    Snoopy572 New Member

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    Well, just an update. I am going to purchase a Marin San Rafeal Hybrid tomorrow. Might go for another hybrid a little higher in price if it's worth it. I'm excited. The price is $439 + $20 for flat service for the life of the bike, plus lifetime adjustments, oh yeah... $7.99 for the kickstand. My father is getting one as well. Very fun day tomorrow. :)
     
  11. Sybersnott

    Sybersnott New Member

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    Hi everybody, I'm new here... so I want to ask this question:

    Should I get a mountain bike and change the tires to something 'on-road'? I really don't know of any off-road trails around where I live. I saw a bike that I liked recently that was built for off-road stuff and it had knobby tires, I was thinking about getting that and just change the tires for what I need it for.

    I am 5'10", 220 pounds and have 22% BF if that helps in my question.... :p
     
  12. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    There's absolutely nothing wrong with knobby tires for paved road riding. They'll be a little slower and noisier than slicks but so what?

    More important is the fork - some cheap mountain bikes have really cheap suspension forks and you'll be better off with a rigid fork. This is sometimes counter intuitive to new riders but anyone with experience will back me on this - you don't want a suspension fork for riding on pavement or even gravel or dirt paths.

    If your stats are true, you're one muscular dude! Advice is the same, regardless. Also - if that bike you saw was at Walmart - fugettaboutit.
     
  13. Cyclesafe

    Cyclesafe New Member

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  14. heavy

    heavy New Member

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    If you're not riding off road, I'd suggest a hybrid. Knobby tires hum and vibrate unless they have a continuous center section. Most all bikeshop bikes currently made can handle the weight, but a wider tire may tend to give a more comfortable ride. Don't be afraid to experiment with inflation pressure, but don't let the pressure get too low or you will get pinch flats on the inside of the tube.

    As you get faster and lighter, you may want to up the pressure, and at some point you will hanker for a good road bike. Until then, the hybrid is your friend.
     
  15. SportDoc

    SportDoc New Member

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    I think you made the right call. Riding a road bike comfortably takes a fit bike and fit body. You are working on the body, so good for you. Once you lean out and get stronger, then you can get a road bike and do the aforementioned competitions/races. Good luck and congrats on getting your life/health turned around.
     
  16. strummer_fan

    strummer_fan New Member

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    You can't go wrong with a Marin like that. I recently bought one for my wife.

    Start easy, and build up your rides and you'll lose weight.

    I've lost 19 lbs. since January.

    You can do it!
     
  17. Snoopy572

    Snoopy572 New Member

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    Well, I picked up the bike today. I'm very excited. I was considering another model or 2, but would be losing the shocks and the ride wasn't as comfortable. I thought a shock on the front fork and the seat woul cause the price to go up, but the ones without were more expensive. I usually have buyers remorse and say I should have bought the other, more expensive bike. I think I'm going to ignore that this time and just start riding.
    This is the one I picked up today...
    http://www.marinbikes.com/bicycles_2006/html/bikes/bike_specs/specs_san_rafael.html
    :D
    Thanks for the help guys and it feels good to be a part of this cycling community.
     
  18. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    I don't know that specific bike, but it looks similar in style to my Giant Sedona, so I think you will be happy with it. I started riding at 365 pounds, and I now have stabilized at about 310.... That is about to change with the new cycling season.

    I will be moving to a Cannondale touring bike I have as soon as my gut is out of the way enough to do it... I expect that to be in another 50 pounds.

    The Sedona has served me well, as I expect your Marin to do.

    Now the trick is to find that balance between taking it easy, and pushing yourself... Do not be concerned if for the first few rides or weeks you aren't able to ride very far... It will improve.

    Keep you pedal cadence up to avoid leg problems, and be sure that rest days are part of your routine.

    Build up your mileage gradually (I have heard 10% more each week is about the max, but for the first few months, you can probably manage more) and before you know it you will be riding 20 miles without any problems. Within about 18 months of starting, I rode my first metric century (actually a little extra, a total of 68 miles).

    By the way, I am 49, so I would encourage you to keep up whatever routine(s) help you to lose and maintain your weight... it doesn't get any easier.
     
  19. RickF

    RickF New Member

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    That is similar to my plan. I started on a Specialized Crossroads - another hybrid similar to yours. When I drop another 50 pounds, I am going to treat myself to a Specalized Sequoia or Trek Pilot, or something similar.
     
  20. Snoopy572

    Snoopy572 New Member

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    Thanks for that reply... very helpful.
     
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