Road Bike or Hybrid? Need Help!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by K-Man, Nov 17, 2003.

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  1. Clyde

    Clyde Guest

    The original poster weighs 240 lbs and has not been on a bike in 20 years. Climbing hills in a too
    high gear would be a great way for him to injure his knees. Hybrid style gearing would be a much
    better choice for him, imho. Even if those gears were on a road bike. I think an XT cassette with a
    32 tooth low gear would be a better choice than the 25 tooth gear that is standard on the Trek 1200.

    Clyde

    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in >
    > A 30x25 is still a pretty low gear. I rode for many years on an old 10-speed bike with a 39x28 low
    > gear, and never met a hill I couldn't climb standing, though some of them took some effort.
     


  2. Kerry

    Kerry Guest

    "Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:x68vb.38439$A%[email protected]...
    > K-Man <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Thanks to all who responded to my original question re getting a road bike or a hybrid. After
    > > the responses here and talking with a couple of guys at my LBS, I'v decided to go the road
    > > route. I've narrowed my choices to two bikes:
    >
    > > Trek 1000C
    >
    > > http://www.trekbike.com/bikes/2004/road/1000c.jsp
    >
    >
    > > Trek 1200C
    >
    > > http://www.trekbike.com/bikes/2004/road/1200c.jsp
    >
    >
    > > The guys at my LBS recommended I go with the 1200 if my budge allowed because of the better
    > > components, specifically:
    >
    > > - Carbon fork
    > > - Better shifters (Shimano Tiagra vs. Shimano Sora)
    > > - Better rims (Alexa AT50 vs. Matrix Aurora)
    >
    > > Taking into account that I'm 6'2", 240 lbs and live in a pretty hilly area, will those
    > > components make _that_ much of a difference. I'd like to get the 1200C, but it's a little out of
    > > my budget. If I got the 1200C, I'd have to skimp on things like shorts, helmet, gloves, and a
    > > few other necessities. :( Thanks in advance!
    >
    > According to the links you gave, the 1200c is only available in three sizes with 58 cm being the
    > largest. The 1000 is available in a 63 cm which seems more approppriate for your height.
    >
    > At 240 pounds, you will want sturdy wheels. These bikes only have 32 spoke wheels. That might be
    > ok, but I'd recommend 36 spoke wheels. And more importantly, have the shop tension and stress
    > relieve the spokes before you take delivery.
    >
    > Art Harris

    That really amazes me that Trek doesn't offer more frame sizes. No 56 cm in either model. Isn't
    56 cm like the size 9 of men's shoes anyway? And nothing bigger than a 58 cm (in the 1200
    model). Sheesh!

    Since these models appear to be that intro to intermediate category of road bike, I wonder how many
    people are riding trek road bikes that don't fit properly?!

    Nothing

    Kerry
     
  3. cmitch46

    cmitch46 New Member

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  4. Roy Tang

    Roy Tang Guest

    On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 08:22:31 -0500, K-Man <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thanks to all who responded to my original question re getting a road bike or a hybrid. After the
    >responses here and talking with a couple of guys at my LBS, I'v decided to go the road route. I've
    >narrowed my choices to two bikes:
    >
    >Trek 1000C
    >
    >http://www.trekbike.com/bikes/2004/road/1000c.jsp
    >
    >
    >Trek 1200C
    >
    >http://www.trekbike.com/bikes/2004/road/1200c.jsp
    >
    >
    >The guys at my LBS recommended I go with the 1200 if my budge allowed because of the better
    >components, specifically:
    >
    > - Carbon fork
    > - Better shifters (Shimano Tiagra vs. Shimano Sora)
    > - Better rims (Alexa AT50 vs. Matrix Aurora)
    >
    >Taking into account that I'm 6'2", 240 lbs and live in a pretty hilly area, will those components
    >make _that_ much of a difference. I'd like to get the 1200C, but it's a little out of my budget. If
    >I got the 1200C, I'd have to skimp on things like shorts, helmet, gloves, and a few other
    >necessities. :( Thanks in advance!
    >
    >Ken

    That's a really good choice, just what I was going to suggest.

    The 1000C or 1200C feel and ride much like a road bike, but have a slightly more upright position
    (about the same as a hybrid) but offer the extra hand positions that make it comfortable for long
    distances. Also, it does have triple chainrings to tackle tough hills.

    I think people are too hung up on components, the 1000C will be a fine bike. If you enjoy riding it,
    then it will be a natural to get shorts, shoes and helmet anyway, so you definitely want to leave
    room in the budget for that.

    Riding a hybrid isn't bad for shorter distances, but the 1000C has all the advantages of a hybrid
    like the 7500FX without the disadvantages.
     
  5. Steve Shapiro

    Steve Shapiro New Member

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    Talk to the shop about the gearing. You might find it more comfortable to switch the cassette to a 12-32 given the hills. The shop should do it for free or short money. They may have to swap the rdr too. Also not a big deal. For the most part it seems like the choice is between 8spd vs. 9spd. The shifters work differently so give them a try to see which you are more comfortable with. Both are good.

    Steve Shapiro
     
  6. Matthew

    Matthew Guest

    "cmitch46" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Originally posted by K-Man Thanks to all who responded to my original question re getting a road
    > bike or a hybrid. After the responses here and talking with a couple of guys at my LBS, I'v
    > decided to go the road route. I've narrowed my choices to two bikes:
    >
    > Trek 1000C
    >
    > http://www.trekbike.com/bikes/2004/road/1000c.jsphttp://www.trekbike.co-
    > m/bikes/2004/road/1000c.jsp
    >
    > Trek 1200C
    >
    > http://www.trekbike.com/bikes/2004/road/1200c.jsphttp://www.trekbike.co-
    > m/bikes/2004/road/1200c.jsp
    >
    >
    > Your two choices are both decent bikes. But since you went from hybrid bike to road bike in one
    > fell swoop, let me suggest a third alternative: a good cyclecross bike. Since you seem to be
    > partial to Treks, check out their X01 (http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/road/xo1.jsp) This, to
    > me reprsents the best of both worlds if you're looking for one bike to do it all (i.e. road riding
    > and light off road riding). The bike is designed primarily an off roader but for your longer
    > anticipated road rides, you have drop bars and bigger tires for long distance comfort. I think
    > cyclecross bikes are often overlooked and their versatilty is missed, maybe due to a mistaken
    > perception by bicycle consumers that they're only for "cyclecross racing".
    >
    Not a bad idea, but the cyclecross bike is more expensive than both of the "comfort road" bikes he
    is considering. Suprised Mike has chimed in yet, maybe the mid-life crisis has led him to try a
    little cyclocross himself?

    Matthew
     
  7. > Hybrids are good for nothing - complete compromise and in six months time you'll regret your
    > decision. I would suggest buying a good quality hard tail mountain bike with an extra set of
    > wheels clad with road tyres (I use hutchinson gold 1" jobs and they do the biz). So it may be a
    > couple of pounds heavier but it's not that big a deal especially if you have no intention of
    > racing - but you end up with a bike that will go anywhere. I've got a '94 GT Karakoram which I
    > keep set up with my road wheels and it does the job fabulously - even on 100 mile rides. Whilst
    > the Trek 5200 road bike is a fab machine, it aint going to go very well on the trail!
    >

    You have a typical SUV mentality. My question for you is, why do you need to have a bike that can go
    anywhere? Your "One size fits all" approach isnt my preference. The hybrid bikes are designed to be
    used for riders who want more speed than a mountain bike (even with slicks) and they are better
    handling on rough surfaces like dirt roads & bad streets. I agree with you that there is a
    compromise when buying a hybrid versus a road bike but for most people buying a hybrid comes down to
    a price/performance advantage.

    Dan.
     
  8. Ilya Sandler

    Ilya Sandler Guest

    Here is my experience:

    I owned a Specialized's Hybrid for 4 years and a couple months ago replaced it with Trek-520
    (touring bike). I mostly use the bike on paved roads of varying quality of pavement with occasional
    dirt road...

    Trek-520 made a LOT of difference speed-wise (10-30%, especially on uphills) and (knocking the wood)
    reliability wise: on the previous bike I was losing spokes roughly once every 300 miles (I'm about
    230lbs), on Trek 520 I have ridden about 700 miles with no spoke breakage...

    Trek-520 has wider rims, more and stronger spokes than tradional road bikes and comes with wider (I
    think 32 mm or 35? mm I don't remember) tires, so it should handle dirt roads and heavy loads much
    better than regular road bike, yet it'd be faster than hybrid..Of course, it's heavier/somewhat
    slower than a regular road bike..

    See the specs here: www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2002/manuals/Touring.pdf

    YMMV

    Good luck, Ilya

    K-Man <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm thinking about asking Santa for a bike for Christmas this year. This will be the first bike
    > I've owned since my teenage BMX days back in the early 80's, so I've been doing some research and
    > visiting the local bike shops. Most of my riding will be on the road, but I will also be doing
    > some offroad riding on light dirt trails and light gravel. I'm currently leaning toward the Trek
    > 7300 since it seems to have the combination of features that I'm looking for:
    >
    > http://www.trekbike.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7300.jsp
    >
    > I live in Western NC, and we have have a number of great road rides that range from 15 to 50
    > miles. My only concern is how this bike will do on longer road rides. Will it be comfortable?
    > What's the longest road trip that this kind of bike is good for? Any other bikes you might suggest
    > given the kind of riding I'll be doing? Thanks in advance!
    >
    > Ken
     
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