Road bike with 1.75" tires?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ken, Jan 23, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Ken

    Ken Guest

    I am looking for a road bike with fatter tires -- so I can ride on grass and prepared trails.

    In the alternative, I am looking for a mountain bike with drop handlebars.

    I understand that some folks call these "touring bikes."

    Can someone please point me to a couple of possibles?

    Thanks, Ken C

    Ken (to reply via email remove "zz" from address)
     
    Tags:


  2. Ken: You're looking for either a CycloCross or touring bike if you want to go with 700c wheels;
    there are a number of nice ones out there. You can visit the TREK website (at
    http://www.trekbikes.com) and look at the X01 and 520 models, which run about $900 and $1000 in the
    US. You can also convert a mountain bike over to drop bars, but unless you need the sturdier wheels
    (appropriate for hard off-road use if it comes your way), the others might do the trick. I should
    point out, however, that you're not going to get a tire as wide as 1.75"; about 44cm is the widest
    available for 700c. Hmm. Not exactly true. There are mountain bikes with 700c tires now, although I
    don't know if an X01 or 520 would have enough clearance for them.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am looking for a road bike with fatter tires -- so I can ride on grass and prepared trails.
    >
    > In the alternative, I am looking for a mountain bike with drop handlebars.
    >
    > I understand that some folks call these "touring bikes."
    >
    > Can someone please point me to a couple of possibles?
    >
    > Thanks, Ken C
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Ken (to reply via email remove "zz" from address)
     
  3. On Fri, 03 Jan 2003 18:01:29 GMT, [email protected] (Ken) wrote:
    > I am looking for a road bike with fatter tires -- so I can ride
    on
    > grass and prepared trails.
    >
    > In the alternative, I am looking for a mountain bike with drop handlebars.
    >
    > I understand that some folks call these "touring bikes."
    >
    > Can someone please point me to a couple of possibles?

    if all you're interested in is the handlebars, why not swap handlebars?

    You'd need a new stem, new handlebars, new brake levers and new shifters. If you already have a
    bicycle you really like this may be an option.

    If you're minded to spend a lot of dosh for a new bike... I'd go with a Thorn Nomad from St. John
    St. Cycles (UK): www.sjscycles.com

    Haven't got that money?

    I have a jamis aurora. 32mm tires--that's about an inch and a quarter, not quite what you need; but
    I mount fenders. There's probably enough room on there for 38mm if you don't mount fenders. (or
    maybe if you do. I haven't tried fatter tires). Comfy bike, though. stable and great fun to ride.
    (provided you're not a crit racer wannabe)

    drop bars forever.

    -Luigi

    ---
    TLP de Guzman Bankside House 24 Sumner Street London SE1 9JA UNITED KINGDOM

    tel: +44 870 873 4587, ext.2766 (landline)
    : +44 781 792 1610 (mobile)

    "Ka-tagal-tagal ko na nag-aaral, tignan mo, kupas na ang aking maong! Kung akala mo ako ay natuto
    na, Hindi pa rin..."
    - Apo Hiking Society
     
  4. Ics

    Ics Guest

    You should check out Rivendell's Atlantis...
    http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_atlantisframes.html

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    | I am looking for a road bike with fatter tires -- so I can ride on grass and prepared trails.
    |
    | In the alternative, I am looking for a mountain bike with drop handlebars.
    |
    | I understand that some folks call these "touring bikes."
    |
    | Can someone please point me to a couple of possibles?
    |
    | Thanks, Ken C
    |
    |
    |
    |
    | Ken (to reply via email remove "zz" from address)
     
  5. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "David L. Johnson >" <David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > On Fri, 03 Jan 2003 13:01:29 -0500, Ken wrote:
    >
    > > I am looking for a road bike with fatter tires -- so I can ride on grass and prepared trails.
    > >
    > > In the alternative, I am looking for a mountain bike with drop handlebars.
    >
    > You have many choices. Most real touring bikes are specifically designed for just that: loaded
    > tours. So, they would have many braze-on fittings for things like extra water bottles and front
    > and rear racks, and would have clearance for fenders and wide tires. They typically would have
    > bar-end shifters, and components chosen for durability rather than light weight or fashion.
    > Geometry is more relaxed: 72-73 degree seattube angle, longer stays, more tire clearance but not
    > higher bottom brackets. They can be expensive, for a good one, since the market is small and
    > buyers are particular.
    >
    > Other options would be a cyclocross (or just "cross") bike. Designed for winter off-road races on
    > typically muddy courses, they are less likely to have a lot of braze-ons for racks or fenders, but
    > might, and they do have room for wider tires, and typically have either cantilever or V-brakes,
    > but drop bars. Built for more impact, but less weight, than a touring frame, with geometry more
    > like a road racing frame, and high bottom bracket. They would have either mountain-bike components
    > with the drop bars and STI brifters, or they might have closer to standard road components (save
    > brakes) with some protection against mud.
    >
    > Of course, no law says you can't put drop bars on a mountain bike. For what you describe, an old
    > rigid-fork mountain bike would work fine, with only the bars and stem swapped out. You might worry
    > about the stem length, since drop bars require you to be further forward than the mountain bike
    > bars. Tha angles aren't the same as a road bike, so it won't handle like one, but it might do
    > quite well. You do need to make sure the brakes work adequately. Most drop-bar brake levers don't
    > pull enough cable for v-brakes without adaptation.

    This is all great advice, but...

    If you're buying new, it's almost always cheaper, easier, and better to buy a bike that's already
    set up the way you want. Manufacturers get huge discounts on parts which are very expensive when
    bought retail -- you could easily spend an extra $300 converting a classic MTB or touring bike to a
    cyclocross bike, and that's assuming you make perfect guesses on which parts to buy, and what size.
    Start experimenting, and the bills really add up. Many folks on this newsgroup are experts at this
    kind of mixing and matching, have encylcopedic knowledge of various frames and parts, and a huge
    supply of cheap/free parts to draw from. Most of us don't.

    So I'd recommend looking for a cyclocross model. It will already have the drop bars, suitable
    geometry, and fatter tires that you need. There aren't many on the market compared to other models,
    but there are still plenty of them. Here are a couple to start with:

    http://www.lemondbikes.com/2003/bikes/bikes_poprad.html

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    Another bike worth considering is the Bianchi Volpe, which over the years has been marketed as
    either a cyclocross or touring model:

    http://209.217.20.46/site/bikes/20_Volpe.html

    The Volpe is a good choice because it comes with road tires, which are better than knobbies
    everywhere but muddy cyclocross races. That's at least $50 saved right there (for example).

    I'm sure there are plenty of others too.

    Matt O.
     
  6. Ken

    Ken Guest

    On Sun, 05 Jan 2003 15:38:49 GMT, Luigi de Guzman
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > (okay, one more, but it'll be an ugly cheap one for riding in London.
    This is another concern in the USA: If you openly use a valuable bike, you could be bike-jacked. My
    first UO8 was stolen out of a rack in New York City, to which it was locked. When I got my second
    UO8, I smeared it with mud so it was less likely to be stolen.

    >So why didn't you use the bike (bikes?) that you had? If you already had bikes and you didn't want
    >to spend money...
    Well, the UO8's were OK for the road, but not on trails. The kids' old mountain bikes sucked on the
    road. As a result, after we moved to the suburbs we stopped riding altogether. Not to mention that
    here on Long Island, there are no bike lanes and car drivers (including one notorious legislator who
    was just appointed a judge) are brimming with road rage.

    >Curiously--what's the intended mileage when you do ride? as in, how far do you want to go when you
    >get on the bike?
    Typically, a day trip would be 25 miles. I would guess at 120 miles a year. I will know for sure
    because I am getting CatEye computers for these. The furthest I ever went in a day on the UO8 was 50
    miles in the NY metropolitan area. I was sore for a week.

    Ken (to reply via email remove "zz" from address)
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...