Road Bike????

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by cyclist95, Sep 17, 2009.

  1. cyclist95

    cyclist95 New Member

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    Hi all,

    I am a beginner cyclist looking for a preferably used road bike. I currently have a Schwinn Super-Sport but do not enjoy riding the upright flat bar position. I was wondering if maybe i could buy a 1980 or 1990 Raleigh or Trek and could still do well in competitions? My budget is about $500 - $700 on CList I have found many old vintage road bikes for sale, for instance:

    SALE!!! 18" Raleigh RT 300 Aluminum

    Would that bike still be a decent bike for a beginner? I would like to get into racing and training. Or if you have any other suggestions just tell me. Thanks. :D
     
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  2. slowbutnotdead

    slowbutnotdead New Member

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    I don't like the bike, I think that if you want to do racing there are better entry level bikes to purchase. look at bicycle magazine april issue to get some ideas and shop for a year old model to get a deal. Also I thought in another post you were 14 year old looking for a 56 cm frame, this frame is an 18" equivalent to 45 cm and will be too small, that in itself will be a waste of money.
     
  3. roadhouse

    roadhouse New Member

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    cyclist95 just bought a brand new motobecane too.
     
  4. cyclist95

    cyclist95 New Member

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    Yes I am 14, and yes, I am looking for a 56cm bike! I was just posting that bike just to show what kind of bike would work for me or would be decent. I did also make a purchase on the Motobecane Record, 56cm road bike. Still waiting for it to arrive. :D
     
  5. rdunba

    rdunba New Member

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    I also turned to CL when i was getting started about 6 months ago.. I posted a wanted add and got a Trek 2100 (circa about 1993) for $125. It's been an awesome bike. Keep hounding craigslist and be patient and you can find a good deal. They're out there.

     
  6. slowbutnotdead

    slowbutnotdead New Member

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    Kally without really understanding your question, this is a stupid reply


    As far as you train your legs to take you.

    Now for the better answer
    This looks like a decent entry level road bike. It appears good enough for most type of road riding. You basically can ride as far as you want, centurys, double centurys, the bike shouldn't be a problem

    If you are intending to do loaded touring on this bike, it is the wrong bike. If you are intending to do supported touring on this bike it should be no problem. The difference is that this bike is not geared for loaded touring, there are no eyelets for attaching racks or fenders. Tire sizes aren't stated.
     
  7. eswari

    eswari New Member

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    A road bicycle is a synonym for the term racing bicycle.[1] As such, road bicycles have drop handlebars and multiple gears, although there are single and fixed gear varieties. Road bikes also use narrow, high-pressure tires to decrease rolling resistance, and tend to be somewhat lighter than other types of bicycle.
    The term road bicycle also can describe any type of bike used primarily on paved roads in contrast to bikes primarily intended for off-road use, such as mountain bikes. Other road bikes include:
    Touring bicycles are designed for bicycle touring: they are robust, comfortable and capable of carrying heavy loads.
    Hybrid bicycles are designed for a variety of recreational and utility purposes. While primarily intended for use on pavement, they may also be used on relatively smooth unpaved paths or trails.
    Utility bicycles are designed for utility cycling: are a traditional bicycle for commuting, shopping and running errands in towns and cities.
    Roadster (bicycle) a specific form of the Utility bicycle developed in the UK.
    Recumbent bicycles are designed for variety of recreational and utility purposes, but are characterised by the unusual riding position in which the cyclist is seated in a reclined position.
     
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