road handlebar width?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by pudster, Nov 28, 2003.

  1. pudster

    pudster New Member

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    I was wondering what road handlebar width people are using and how you determine it?
     
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  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Try www.wrenchscience.com
     
  3. eddiebrannan

    eddiebrannan New Member

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    measure from shoulder socket to shoulder socket in the front, where you can feel the protrusion of the bone. same size as that c-to-c.
     
  4. rollers

    rollers New Member

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    That'd be your best rule of thumb. Then if you're like me you like them on the narrow side so you get the 40's.

    Go with what's comfortable.
     
  5. pudster

    pudster New Member

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    I think Lemond used 44cm bars that today would be 46cm by the way bars are measured today (outside to outside). He was not a big person. We also use wider mountain bars and I don't think that that hinders your breathing. It is not good for aerodynamics but it does not matter on mountain bikes as much. I don't think that they should be as wide as mountain bars though.
     
  6. Rudy

    Rudy New Member

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    well not all handlebars are measured outside to outside. My Ritchey is measured center to center.

    Here's a thought. A narrower handlebar will make your steering a little bit more twitchy (smaller turning radius). And out of the saddle sprint and climbs, as you're pulling on the handle to sprint or climb fast, it would require you to keep a more stable balance. more wobbly another word.

    A wider handlebar would give you a more neutral steering, albeit slower or less twitchy turn (larger turning radius). Out of the saddle sprint and climbing would give a little bit more stability. But too wide can make your arm fatigued, feeling too stretched.

    All is taken into consideration of your bike characteristic (twitchy or more laid back handling) and of course, the all important, your shoulder width.
    Hope that helps.
     
  7. Waldo

    Waldo New Member

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    ^
    It's mainly European bars that are measured outside to outside. Everybody has their preferences on bar width. The above method is good for getting in the ballpark and then figuring out what works for you. I prefer a slightly wider bar than most people my size because I find I breathe a bit better (asthmatic). Obviously, this increases drag but I'll take it.
     
  8. Rudy

    Rudy New Member

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    uummm...just another point...too narrow a bar and if you want to stretch out your hand positions, there's no where else to put them.
    Too wide a bar, you can still move your hands toward the stem, albeit not the same..
     
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