Road rash - wet or dry healing?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Claire Petersky, Apr 5, 2004.

  1. Two years ago, when I had a case of road rash, members of
    this group recommended tegaderm to me, which is a sort of
    plastic wrap to put over your scraped flesh. The point of
    this stuff is to sort of seal it up, keep it moist, and let
    the skin under it heal. The tegaderm didn't end up working
    that well for me, as I had a lot of problems with infection
    under the plastic.

    This time, since I actually received expert medical
    attention, I asked about using tegaderm. They recommend to
    me instead to clean the scrapes at least daily with soap
    (ow!) and warm water and a washcloth, and then I'm to spread
    the antibiotic cream over them like frosting. Then I'm use a
    clean dry method of covering, with non-adhesive gauze pads,
    held into place with stretchy gauze tape.

    Further, I was warned to be cautious in the tub not to soak
    the scabs off. Luckily, all injuries on are on my right
    side, and the tub is oriented such that I can hang my limbs
    over the edge without having to sit at the tap end. There
    probably aren't that many bathers here, just because there
    aren't that many in the general population, but I
    personally love a hot soak in the evening. Hot water is a
    vice, but a fairly benign one. Anyway, does this advice
    also sound familiar?

    This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    have you used the most successfully?

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    books I've set free at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
    Tags:


  2. Psycholist

    Psycholist Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54...
    > Two years ago, when I had a case of road rash, members of
    > this group recommended tegaderm to me, which is a sort of
    > plastic wrap to put over
    your
    > scraped flesh. The point of this stuff is to sort of seal
    > it up, keep it moist, and let the skin under it heal. The
    > tegaderm didn't end up working that well for me, as I had
    > a lot of problems with infection under the plastic.
    >
    > This time, since I actually received expert medical
    > attention, I asked
    about
    > using tegaderm. They recommend to me instead to clean the
    > scrapes at least daily with soap (ow!) and warm water and
    > a washcloth, and then I'm to
    spread
    > the antibiotic cream over them like frosting. Then I'm use
    > a clean dry method of covering, with non-adhesive gauze
    > pads, held into place with stretchy gauze tape.
    >
    > Further, I was warned to be cautious in the tub not to
    > soak the scabs off. Luckily, all injuries on are on my
    > right side, and the tub is oriented
    such
    > that I can hang my limbs over the edge without having to
    > sit at the tap
    end.
    > There probably aren't that many bathers here, just because
    > there aren't
    that
    > many in the general population, but I personally love a
    > hot soak in the evening. Hot water is a vice, but a fairly
    > benign one. Anyway, does this advice also sound familiar?
    >
    > This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    > have you used
    the
    > most successfully?
    >
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    >
    >
    > Claire Petersky

    Claire,

    Sorry to see you have a road rash situation to deal with.
    When I got hit by a car recently, road rash was the least of
    my injuries, but it was there, nonetheless. I wish I could
    tell you what it was they gave me. It was a yellow, gauzy
    product that was heavily impregnated with something like
    petroleum jelly. It was very gooy. Maybe it was because I
    had major stitches in the same places I had the road rash,
    but I wasn't allowed to get anything wet for a long time.
    But I had to replace this gauze daily. It came in a foil
    pouch. Well, it worked wonderfully. By the time I was able
    to get things wet, the skin was pretty much intact and I had
    no real problems with washing away scabs. I've told my wife
    to save the leftover gauzy stuff and I have it around here
    somewhere. If I can find it, I'll let you know what it is.
    We were buying it at the local drugstore after the supply
    from the hospital ran out.

    Hope you feel better.

    Bob C.
     
  3. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Mon, 05 Apr 2004 15:51:01 GMT, "Claire Petersky"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    >have you used the most successfully?
    >

    This isn't the same exactly, but when I had a mole biopsied,
    I was told to keep it covered with antibacterial ointment,
    cover it with a dry bandage, and change it daily. One goal
    was to keep scabs from forming in the first place, as this
    increases the scarring. Sounds similar to what you have been
    told this time around.
     
  4. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    The best healing I ever got from road rash wasn't exactly
    road rash. I was coming down off of the Pinnacles above
    Calistoga in the Napa Valley. This is all volcanic area and
    the road had originally been a mine feight trail with the
    wheel ruts carved out of the stone by Chinese laborers.

    I was with some young guys who were really fast and I was
    going to show them the way to descend. In fact I was well
    up the road from them and puling away rapidly with my
    technique of fear freezing my fingers so that they couldn't
    pull the brakes.

    In one location I came around a corner at maybe 25 mph and
    the front wheel washed out. I landed right in the lava and
    it took maybe 10 feet for the skin abrading to slow me to a
    stop. I managed to roll around a bit to spread the damage
    out pretty evenly on my left side.

    I was intent on beating everyone to the bottom so I
    jumped up and continued before they got to me. At the
    bottom someone had the bright idea of going into the hot
    springs. Right.

    Well the water was heavily chlorinated because of all the
    people in it. VERY heavily chlorinated by the smell.

    I soaked in that bath for perhaps 2 hours. The result was
    that all of the bacteria that might have gotten into those
    cuts and scrapes was eleminated completely. Within 2 weeks I
    was completely healed without a scar.

    I've been using chlorine bleach ever since instead of normal
    antiseptics. It doesn't burn (diluted in a bath tub of
    course), is cheap and works like gangbusters. When I cut my
    toe off and was supposed to soak the stub in Clinidine
    (damned expensive for fake iodine) I didn't like the surface
    infections I was getting and started using Chlorox instead.

    I would suppose that most scaring is caused by bacterial
    infections post trauma. If the wound is clean enough the
    scab will form over a clean wound and you won't have any
    problems. But picking the scab off invites secondary
    infection.

    Tegaderm works by maintaining a nice moist wound but the
    problem is that secondary infections are almost guaranteed
    without access to cleaning. And Tegaderm is fantastically
    expensive for nothing more than a piece of plastic. \
     
  5. Tom Kunich <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Within 2 weeks I was completely healed without a scar.

    within reason). i sure do.

    perhaps pick at 'em a bit ..
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  6. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:

    > This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    > have you used the most successfully?

    Tegaderm has worked great for me. You have to clean the road
    rash really well before applying the tegaderm, but then it
    works fine. I've never had an infection. I've had road rash
    almost disappear in 7 days with tegaderm. Since it's a clear
    bandage, it's easy to watch for infection.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://bike.terrymorse.com/
     
  7. Doug

    Doug Guest

    Maybe you should stay away from bikes and powertools? At
    least give us all a warning first!

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:vf-
    [email protected]
    > The best healing I ever got from road rash wasn't exactly
    > road rash. I was coming down off of the Pinnacles above
    > Calistoga in the Napa Valley. This
    is
    > all volcanic area and the road had originally been a mine
    > feight trail
    with
    > the wheel ruts carved out of the stone by Chinese
    > laborers.
    >
    > I was with some young guys who were really fast and I was
    > going to show
    them
    > the way to descend. In fact I was well up the road from
    > them and puling
    away
    > rapidly with my technique of fear freezing my fingers so
    > that they
    couldn't
    > pull the brakes.
    >
    > In one location I came around a corner at maybe 25 mph and
    > the front wheel washed out. I landed right in the lava and
    > it took maybe 10 feet for the skin abrading to slow me to
    > a stop. I managed to roll around a bit to
    spread
    > the damage out pretty evenly on my left side.
    >
    > I was intent on beating everyone to the bottom so I
    > jumped up and
    continued
    > before they got to me. At the bottom someone had the
    > bright idea of going into the hot springs. Right.
    >
    > Well the water was heavily chlorinated because of all the
    > people in it.
    VERY
    > heavily chlorinated by the smell.
    >
    > I soaked in that bath for perhaps 2 hours. The result was
    > that all of the bacteria that might have gotten into those
    > cuts and scrapes was eleminated completely. Within 2 weeks
    > I was completely healed without a scar.
    >
    > I've been using chlorine bleach ever since instead of
    > normal antiseptics.
    It
    > doesn't burn (diluted in a bath tub of course), is cheap
    > and works like gangbusters. When I cut my toe off and was
    > supposed to soak the stub in Clinidine (damned expensive
    > for fake iodine) I didn't like the surface infections I
    > was getting and started using Chlorox instead.
    >
    > I would suppose that most scaring is caused by bacterial
    > infections post trauma. If the wound is clean enough the
    > scab will form over a clean wound and you won't have any
    > problems. But picking the scab off invites
    secondary
    > infection.
    >
    > Tegaderm works by maintaining a nice moist wound but the
    > problem is that secondary infections are almost guaranteed
    > without access to cleaning. And Tegaderm is fantastically
    > expensive for nothing more than a piece of plastic. \
     
  8. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Mon, 05 Apr 2004 15:51:01 GMT, <[email protected]_s54>,
    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    >have you used the most successfully?

    "Homeoplasmine" made by Boiron in Ste-Foy, France and
    "Traumeel" made by Biologische Heilmittel Heel GmbH in Baden-
    Baden, Germany.

    I won't say I'm anxious to try it, but I heard that honey
    works great.
    --
    zk
     
  9. Patrick Lamb

    Patrick Lamb Guest

    On Mon, 05 Apr 2004 15:51:01 GMT, "Claire Petersky"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Two years ago, when I had a case of road rash, members of
    >this group recommended tegaderm to me, which is a sort of
    >plastic wrap to put over your scraped flesh. The point of
    >this stuff is to sort of seal it up, keep it moist, and let
    >the skin under it heal. The tegaderm didn't end up working
    >that well for me, as I had a lot of problems with infection
    >under the plastic.
    >
    [...]
    >
    >This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    >have you used the most successfully?

    Claire,

    Sorry to hear about your road rash. You shouldn't oughta do
    things that give you that!

    I was one of the ones recommending Tegaderm last time. I've
    used it since, and I did have a minor infection start up.
    However, since it was on my knee, the Tegaderm was peeling
    off after a couple of days, and I washed the infection off
    in the shower, applied another layer of ointment and another
    $2.50 Tegaderm, and it cleared up.

    I'd speculate you had an infection beginning by the time you
    got the bandage on, or didn't have it as clean as it needed
    to be, or didn't have enough antibiotic ointment on. Think
    of putting it on like the Brits put butter on -- a nice, quarter-
    inch thick slab! Well, maybe not quite that much, but more
    than just a thin wipe.

    Or maybe it just didn't work well for you for some
    other reason.

    But I still swear by it!

    Pat
     
  10. >There probably aren't that many bathers here, just because
    >there aren't that many in the general population, but I
    >personally love a hot soak in the evening. Hot water is a
    >vice, but a fairly benign one. Anyway, does this advice
    >also sound familiar?

    Well, I rarely bathe. However I DO love a good hot water
    shower on a daily basis, twenty-five minutes under the chute
    in the morning and a good shot in the evening in the summer,
    that's a pretty good show.

    I try to stay clean.

    I have all sorts of road rash that is historical, hell I
    have cuts and nicks that date back, I can DATE my road rash
    scars back to the Seventies, for example.

    But it isn't a big deal.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY
    MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------ __________306.350.357.38-
    >>[email protected]__________
     
  11. Drs

    Drs Guest

    Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]
    > Mon, 05 Apr 2004 15:51:01 GMT,
    > <[email protected]_s54>, "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]
    > potato.com> wrote:
    >
    >> This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    >> have you used the most successfully?
    >
    > "Homeoplasmine" made by Boiron in Ste-Foy, France and
    > "Traumeel" made by Biologische Heilmittel Heel GmbH in Baden-
    > Baden, Germany.
    >
    > I won't say I'm anxious to try it, but I heard that honey
    > works great.

    http://www.nature.com/nsu/021118/021118-1.html

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    B: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  12. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

  13. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >"Claire Petersky" [email protected]

    wrote in part:

    >This time, since I actually received expert medical
    >attention, I asked about using tegaderm. They recommend to
    >me instead to clean the scrapes at least daily with soap
    >(ow!) and warm water and a washcloth, and then I'm to
    >spread the antibiotic cream over them like frosting. Then
    >I'm use a clean dry method of covering, with non-adhesive
    >gauze pads, held into place with stretchy gauze tape.
    >
    >Further, I was warned to be cautious in the tub not to soak
    >the scabs off. Luckily, all injuries on are on my right
    >side, and the tub is oriented such that I can hang my limbs
    >over the edge without having to sit at the tap end. There
    >probably aren't that many bathers here, just because there
    >aren't that many in the general population, but I
    >personally love a hot soak in the evening. Hot water is a
    >vice, but a fairly benign one. Anyway, does this advice
    >also sound familiar?
    >
    >This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    >have you used the most successfully?
    >
    >Warm Regards, Claire Petersky

    I've used both methods you describe and both worked equally
    well for me. I'd choose the tegaderm route over the "clean
    it daily with soap and water" method though simply because
    it's easier and relatively painless but you paid for the
    doctor's advice so you should get your money's worth.

    Regards, Bob Hunt
     
  14. The Real Bev

    The Real Bev Guest

    Tom Kunich wrote:

    > <painful story skipped> I would suppose that most scaring
    > is caused by bacterial infections post trauma. If the
    > wound is clean enough the scab will form over a clean
    > wound and you won't have any problems. But picking the
    > scab off invites secondary infection.

    I fell off my motorcycle and ended up with road rash a foot
    wide from just below my bra to my waist. Immediate pain
    increased and then decreased by Americaine spray, but it
    eventually scabbed over. I think the scab must have been
    nearly 1/4" thick in places, and then it cracked and REALLY
    hurt. I soaked in the tub for a couple of hours and picked
    the entire thing off. The only scar was temporary, a line
    right at the crack. Fortunately I love to pick scabs, but
    this was a bit much even for me.

    > Tegaderm works by maintaining a nice moist wound but the
    > problem is that secondary infections are almost guaranteed
    > without access to cleaning. And Tegaderm is fantastically
    > expensive for nothing more than a piece of plastic.

    Better is to not get it at all. Areas covered by cloth
    (levis, bra and cotton shirt) were OK, but my shirt pulled
    up as I slid along the asphalt. I guess I should feel good
    -- about half an inch of metal got scraped off the rack on
    the back of the bike. If I had to do it again I'd try to
    keep a scab from forming, but I suspect that that might be a
    full-time job.

    --
    Cheers, Bev
    ************************************************************
    "Let them eat shit."

    -- Marcel Antoinette, Marie's little-known brother
     
  15. "Hunrobe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I've used both methods you describe and both worked
    > equally well for me.
    I'd
    > choose the tegaderm route over the "clean it daily with
    > soap and water"
    method
    > though simply because it's easier and relatively painless
    > but you paid for
    the
    > doctor's advice so you should get your money's worth.

    I've actually been very pleased with this semi-dry, clean it
    daily method as I feel like the healing has been much
    quicker than the last time I had road rash. However, the
    last time I had real problems with infection, probably
    because I didn't have it cleaned professionally with
    antibiotic (internal as well as external) follow-up, so it's
    not necessarily a fair comparison.

    Some was kind enough to forward me privately a series of
    articles from rbr, mostly regarding the wetter method. One
    thing that was noted was that it is hassle for the "serious
    athlete" to have to deal with dressing changes. Actually, I
    think it was all the dressing changes I did the first day or
    so that made a difference in ensuring it to remain nice and
    clean. And I'm not a serious athlete, although after
    cleaning and cooking for Pesach, I began to feel like one by
    the end of the day :).

    Further, with tegaderm you have this gross-out wound
    smooshed down with clear plastic, and I've come to the
    conclusion that I prefer the aesthetics of white gauze.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    books I've set free at:
    http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  16. Tomp

    Tomp Guest

    Being a man, and not particularly concerned about scarring,
    I just let them heal nature's way. And, there is nothing
    wrong with a good "hot soak" in the tub after a ride, of
    any kind...

    Cheers, Tp

    Claire Petersky wrote:

    > Two years ago, when I had a case of road rash, members of
    > this group recommended tegaderm to me, which is a sort of
    > plastic wrap to put over your scraped flesh. The point of
    > this stuff is to sort of seal it up, keep it moist, and
    > let the skin under it heal. The tegaderm didn't end up
    > working that well for me, as I had a lot of problems with
    > infection under the plastic.
    >
    > This time, since I actually received expert medical
    > attention, I asked about using tegaderm. They recommend to
    > me instead to clean the scrapes at least daily with soap
    > (ow!) and warm water and a washcloth, and then I'm to
    > spread the antibiotic cream over them like frosting. Then
    > I'm use a clean dry method of covering, with non-adhesive
    > gauze pads, held into place with stretchy gauze tape.
    >
    > Further, I was warned to be cautious in the tub not to
    > soak the scabs off. Luckily, all injuries on are on my
    > right side, and the tub is oriented such that I can hang
    > my limbs over the edge without having to sit at the tap
    > end. There probably aren't that many bathers here, just
    > because there aren't that many in the general population,
    > but I personally love a hot soak in the evening. Hot water
    > is a vice, but a fairly benign one. Anyway, does this
    > advice also sound familiar?
    >
    > This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm. What
    > have you used the most successfully?
    >
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    > Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato
    > and .net for .com Home of the meditative cyclist:
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm See the
    > books I've set free at:
    > http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky

    --
    Tp,

    -------- __o
    ----- -\<. -------- __o
    --- ( )/ ( ) ---- -\<.
    -------------------- ( )/ ( )
    -----------------------------------------

    No Lawsuit Ever Fixed A Moron...
     
  17. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Then I'm use a clean dry
    > > method of covering, with non-adhesive gauze pads, held
    > > into place with

    > > stretchy gauze tape.
    > >
    > > This is definitely a drier method than the tegaderm.
    > > What have you used the most successfully?
    > >
    > > Warm Regards,
    > >
    > > Claire Petersky

    Basically, that's also what I did to heal my knees last
    year, when I took a dive. On my doctor's advice I used non
    stick type gauze pads, taped to the skin with a stretchy
    adhesive tape. Also used a small dose of Bacitracin ointment
    daily (an over the counter antibiotic cream). The initial
    damage looked severe, and I lost a few square inches of skin
    off both knees. Pain and loss of flexiblity kept me off the
    wheels for over 3 weeks. Using this 'dry' method, I had no
    infection problems. Don't worry if you lose some big pieces
    of scab. If you are giving it air and using antibiotic
    cream, you should be fine. We cyclists heal well. I wish you
    to get well and stay well! Best regards, Bernie

    PS: After the surface was healed, I used a skin cream with
    vitamin E.
    It seems to help reduce scar tissue, and to promote
    flexibility.
     
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