Road rash

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Steve Palincsar, Apr 3, 2003.

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  1. I've been pretty lucky over the years: my personal experience with wrecks in general, and road rash
    in particular, has been fairly limited. There have been a few notable exceptions over the years,
    though: an invisible pothole in '95 that broke my clavicle; the jogger back in '84 who zigged left,
    then crossed in front of me as I was passing right; and there was last Tuesday, April 1.

    I had taken the new-to-us Moulton AM16 to work. I'd bought the bike over Christmas, mostly for my
    wife, and partly so I could ride it as a travel bike. Gilbert at North Road had set me up with parts
    so I could swap handlebar/stem/control assemblies back and forth, and this was the first time the
    bike was on the road with the new gear.

    Coming off the 14th Street Bridge, the front tire split at the bead with a Bam! and in less than a
    second the bike cut hard left, leaned over at about a 45 degree angle, and I augered into the
    pavement at about 15 mph. I was rather surprised - I've had plenty of tires blow, but I've never had
    a sidewall separation right at the bead in front. The sudden yaw and roll to the left came out of
    nowhere. And I was surprised, too, at how hard that pavement felt when I slammed down on it.

    I came down on my left elbow, left shoulder and left knee, and as I learned when I got home,
    abrasions ranging from some fairly superficial to a few that were moderately deep. Nothing
    particularly horrifying or fear-factor-make-you-puke, mind, but enough that it would have been
    rather uncomfortable had we used old-fashioned bandaging materials.

    Back in 95, vaguely remembering something I'd read in Bicycling magazine, I tried some Spenco Second
    Skin. This is a gel bandaging material made primarily for burns, and still available for that
    purpose. It had worked amazingly well on ordinary road rash too, much to my wife's surprise - fast
    healing, no pain, no scarring. So off she went to the drug store.

    While there, she found another new bandaging material, this one made specifically for road rash:
    Johnson & Johnson First Aid Advanced Care "advanced healing adhesive pads". You clean the wound and
    dry it, warm the pad between your hands for a minute, stick it down on the wound and hold it on for
    a minute, and then leave it on for "several days". No need to change the dressing; and no need to
    bandage it on - it's on there, believe me.

    These bandages are simply marvelous. I have felt absolutely no pain from these abrasions other than
    washing them off in the shower. Even the doctor I visited this morning (didn't like how it felt when
    the seatbelt was on my clavicle and I thought I'd check it out - just bruising, kind of like having
    been punched in the arm and the shoulder and along the back of the neck) was impressed.

    For better or worse, road rash is a part of the life we have chosen. These things literally take the
    sting out of it. They're about six bucks for a pack of four, and worth every penny and then some.

    One other observation: not to start any kind of helmet flame war here, but there was no doubt at all
    I came down fairly hard on the side of my head. The foam inside the helmet was damaged, and the
    outer skin of the helmet was scratched up. I felt pretty fuzzy headed for a minute or two after the
    wreck - I even briefly entertained the thought of lying there on the pavement while I inventoried my
    parts - but the worst of it was a slight headache, and that was probably from the slam along the
    back of my neck.

    I can't claim the helmet saved my life, and I make no statistical observations or generalizations
    about anybody else's life. However, I will say, I was damned glad I had it on when I hit. Better it
    got the impact and the scrapes than my head. This may not be meaningful in a statistical sense, but
    frankly I don't care.
     
    Tags:


  2. "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've been pretty lucky over the years: my personal experience with wrecks in general, and road
    > rash in particular, has been fairly limited. There have been a few notable exceptions over the
    > years, though: an invisible pothole in '95 that broke my clavicle; the jogger back in '84 who
    > zigged left, then crossed in front of me as I was passing right; and there was last Tuesday,
    > April 1.
    >
    > I had taken the new-to-us Moulton AM16 to work. I'd bought the bike over Christmas, mostly for my
    > wife, and partly so I could ride it as a travel bike. Gilbert at North Road had set me up with
    > parts so I could swap handlebar/stem/control assemblies back and forth, and this was the first
    > time the bike was on the road with the new gear.
    >
    > Coming off the 14th Street Bridge, the front tire split at the bead with a Bam! and in less than a
    > second the bike cut hard left, leaned over at about a 45 degree angle, and I augered into the
    > pavement at about 15 mph. I was rather surprised - I've had plenty of tires blow, but I've never
    > had a sidewall separation right at the bead in front. The sudden yaw and roll to the left came out
    > of nowhere. And I was surprised, too, at how hard that pavement felt when I slammed down on it.
    >
    > I came down on my left elbow, left shoulder and left knee, and as I learned when I got home,
    > abrasions ranging from some fairly superficial to a few that were moderately deep. Nothing
    > particularly horrifying or fear-factor-make-you-puke, mind, but enough that it would have been
    > rather uncomfortable had we used old-fashioned bandaging materials.
    >
    > Back in 95, vaguely remembering something I'd read in Bicycling magazine, I tried some Spenco
    > Second Skin. This is a gel bandaging material made primarily for burns, and still available for
    > that purpose. It had worked amazingly well on ordinary road rash too, much to my wife's surprise -
    > fast healing, no pain, no scarring. So off she went to the drug store.
    >
    > While there, she found another new bandaging material, this one made specifically for road rash:
    > Johnson & Johnson First Aid Advanced Care "advanced healing adhesive pads". You clean the wound
    > and dry it, warm the pad between your hands for a minute, stick it down on the wound and hold it
    > on for a minute, and then leave it on for "several days". No need to change the dressing; and no
    > need to bandage it on - it's on there, believe me.
    >
    > These bandages are simply marvelous. I have felt absolutely no pain from these abrasions other
    > than washing them off in the shower. Even the doctor I visited this morning (didn't like how it
    > felt when the seatbelt was on my clavicle and I thought I'd check it out - just bruising, kind of
    > like having been punched in the arm and the shoulder and along the back of the neck) was
    > impressed.
    >
    > For better or worse, road rash is a part of the life we have chosen. These things literally
    > take the sting out of it. They're about six bucks for a pack of four, and worth every penny and
    > then some.
    >
    > One other observation: not to start any kind of helmet flame war here, but there was no doubt at
    > all I came down fairly hard on the side of my head. The foam inside the helmet was damaged, and
    > the outer skin of the helmet was scratched up. I felt pretty fuzzy headed for a minute or two
    > after the wreck - I even briefly entertained the thought of lying there on the pavement while I
    > inventoried my parts - but the worst of it was a slight headache, and that was probably from the
    > slam along the back of my neck.
    >
    > I can't claim the helmet saved my life, and I make no statistical observations or generalizations
    > about anybody else's life. However, I will say, I was damned glad I had it on when I hit. Better
    > it got the impact and the scrapes than my head. This may not be meaningful in a statistical sense,
    > but frankly I don't care.

    ouch! I feel your pain. (rain wet-painted crosswalk) I will try gauze for the next time....
     
  3. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've been pretty lucky over the years: my personal experience with wrecks in general, and road
    > rash in particular, has been fairly limited. There have been a few notable exceptions over the
    > years, though: an invisible pothole in '95 that broke my clavicle; the jogger back in '84 who
    > zigged left, then crossed in front of me as I was passing right; and there was last Tuesday,
    > April 1.

    You deserved that last one. What were you doing passing on the right?

    >
    > I had taken the new-to-us Moulton AM16 to work. I'd bought the bike over Christmas, mostly for my
    > wife, and partly so I could ride it as a travel bike. Gilbert at North Road had set me up with
    > parts so I could swap handlebar/stem/control assemblies back and forth, and this was the first
    > time the bike was on the road with the new gear.
    >
    > Coming off the 14th Street Bridge, the front tire split at the bead with a Bam! and in less than a
    > second the bike cut hard left, leaned over at about a 45 degree angle, and I augered into the
    > pavement at about 15 mph. I was rather surprised - I've had plenty of tires blow, but I've never
    > had a sidewall separation right at the bead in front. The sudden yaw and roll to the left came out
    > of nowhere. And I was surprised, too, at how hard that pavement felt when I slammed down on it.
    >
    > I came down on my left elbow, left shoulder and left knee, and as I learned when I got home,
    > abrasions ranging from some fairly superficial to a few that were moderately deep. Nothing
    > particularly horrifying or fear-factor-make-you-puke, mind, but enough that it would have been
    > rather uncomfortable had we used old-fashioned bandaging materials.
    >
    > Back in 95, vaguely remembering something I'd read in Bicycling magazine, I tried some Spenco
    > Second Skin. This is a gel bandaging material made primarily for burns, and still available for
    > that purpose. It had worked amazingly well on ordinary road rash too, much to my wife's surprise -
    > fast healing, no pain, no scarring. So off she went to the drug store.
    >
    > While there, she found another new bandaging material, this one made specifically for road rash:
    > Johnson & Johnson First Aid Advanced Care "advanced healing adhesive pads". You clean the wound
    > and dry it, warm the pad between your hands for a minute, stick it down on the wound and hold it
    > on for a minute, and then leave it on for "several days". No need to change the dressing; and no
    > need to bandage it on - it's on there, believe me.
    >
    > These bandages are simply marvelous. I have felt absolutely no pain from these abrasions other
    > than washing them off in the shower. Even the doctor I visited this morning (didn't like how it
    > felt when the seatbelt was on my clavicle and I thought I'd check it out - just bruising, kind of
    > like having been punched in the arm and the shoulder and along the back of the neck) was
    > impressed.
    >
    > For better or worse, road rash is a part of the life we have chosen. These things literally
    > take the sting out of it. They're about six bucks for a pack of four, and worth every penny and
    > then some.
    >
    > One other observation: not to start any kind of helmet flame war here, but there was no doubt at
    > all I came down fairly hard on the side of my head. The foam inside the helmet was damaged, and
    > the outer skin of the helmet was scratched up. I felt pretty fuzzy headed for a minute or two
    > after the wreck - I even briefly entertained the thought of lying there on the pavement while I
    > inventoried my parts - but the worst of it was a slight headache, and that was probably from the
    > slam along the back of my neck.
    >
    > I can't claim the helmet saved my life, and I make no statistical observations or generalizations
    > about anybody else's life. However, I will say, I was damned glad I had it on when I hit. Better
    > it got the impact and the scrapes than my head. This may not be meaningful in a statistical sense,
    > but frankly I don't care.
     
  4. Paul D.

    Paul D. Guest

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I've been pretty lucky over the years: my personal experience with
    wrecks
    > > in general, and road rash in particular, has been fairly limited. There have been a few notable
    > > exceptions over the years, though: an invisible pothole in '95 that broke my clavicle; the
    > > jogger back in '84 who zigged left, then crossed in front of me as I was passing right; and
    > > there was last Tuesday, April 1.
    >
    > You deserved that last one. What were you doing passing on the right?

    Man, thats cold. He paid, let it rest.

    >
    > >
    > > I had taken the new-to-us Moulton AM16 to work. I'd bought the bike
    over
    > > Christmas, mostly for my wife, and partly so I could ride it as a travel bike. Gilbert at North
    > > Road had set me up with parts so I could swap handlebar/stem/control assemblies back and forth,
    > > and this was the first time the bike was on the road with the new gear.
    > >
    > > Coming off the 14th Street Bridge, the front tire split at the bead with
    a
    > > Bam! and in less than a second the bike cut hard left, leaned over at about a 45 degree angle,
    > > and I augered into the pavement at about 15
    mph.
    > > I was rather surprised - I've had plenty of tires blow, but I've never
    had
    > > a sidewall separation right at the bead in front. The sudden yaw and
    roll
    > > to the left came out of nowhere. And I was surprised, too, at how hard that pavement felt when I
    > > slammed down on it.
    > >
    > > I came down on my left elbow, left shoulder and left knee, and as I learned when I got home,
    > > abrasions ranging from some fairly superficial
    to
    > > a few that were moderately deep. Nothing particularly horrifying or fear-factor-make-you-puke,
    > > mind, but enough that it would have been
    rather
    > > uncomfortable had we used old-fashioned bandaging materials.
    > >
    > > Back in 95, vaguely remembering something I'd read in Bicycling
    magazine,
    > > I tried some Spenco Second Skin. This is a gel bandaging material made primarily for burns, and
    > > still available for that purpose. It had
    worked
    > > amazingly well on ordinary road rash too, much to my wife's surprise - fast healing, no pain, no
    > > scarring. So off she went to the drug store.
    > >
    > > While there, she found another new bandaging material, this one made specifically for road rash:
    > > Johnson & Johnson First Aid Advanced Care "advanced healing adhesive pads". You clean the wound
    > > and dry it, warm the pad between your hands for a minute, stick it down on the wound and hold it
    > > on for a minute, and then leave it on for "several days". No
    need
    > > to change the dressing; and no need to bandage it on - it's on there, believe me.
    > >
    > > These bandages are simply marvelous. I have felt absolutely no pain
    from
    > > these abrasions other than washing them off in the shower. Even the doctor I visited this
    > > morning (didn't like how it felt when the seatbelt was on my clavicle and I thought I'd check it
    > > out - just bruising, kind
    of
    > > like having been punched in the arm and the shoulder and along the back
    of
    > > the neck) was impressed.
    > >
    > > For better or worse, road rash is a part of the life we have chosen.
    These
    > > things literally take the sting out of it. They're about six bucks for
    a
    > > pack of four, and worth every penny and then some.
    > >
    > > One other observation: not to start any kind of helmet flame war here,
    but
    > > there was no doubt at all I came down fairly hard on the side of my
    head.
    > > The foam inside the helmet was damaged, and the outer skin of the helmet was scratched up. I
    > > felt pretty fuzzy headed for a minute or two after the wreck - I even briefly entertained the
    > > thought of lying there on the pavement while I inventoried my parts - but the worst of it was a
    > > slight headache, and that was probably from the slam along the back of my neck.
    > >
    > > I can't claim the helmet saved my life, and I make no statistical observations or
    > > generalizations about anybody else's life. However, I will say, I was damned glad I had it on
    > > when I hit. Better it got the impact and the scrapes than my head. This may not be meaningful in
    > > a statistical sense, but frankly I don't care.
    >
     
  5. On Thu, 03 Apr 2003 22:12:41 -0500, Robin Hubert wrote:

    > "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I've been pretty lucky over the years: my personal experience with wrecks in general, and road
    >> rash in particular, has been fairly limited. There have been a few notable exceptions over the
    >> years, though: an invisible pothole in '95 that broke my clavicle; the jogger back in '84 who
    >> zigged left, then crossed in front of me as I was passing right; and there was last Tuesday,
    >> April 1.
    >
    > You deserved that last one. What were you doing passing on the right?
    >

    Excuse me - I was on the bike trail, he went off onto the left shoulder of the bike trail, leaving
    me on his right. I passed him, and as I was doing so, he cut across the bike trail in front of me.
    So no, I didn't deserve the last one.

    And incidentally, if you're passing a runner and he goes off to your left, would you propose going
    even further left to pass him?
     
  6. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    Steve:

    Glad you are basically OK and only scraped up. Hope you heal quickly and are back at.

    Wonder if the small tires of the Moulton had anything to do with the quick fall.

    >One other observation: not to start any kind of helmet flame war here, but there was no doubt at
    >all I came down fairly hard on the side of my head. The foam inside the helmet was damaged, and the
    >outer skin of the helmet was scratched up. I felt pretty fuzzy headed for a minute or two after the
    >wreck - I even briefly entertained the thought of lying there on the pavement while I inventoried
    >my parts - but the worst of it was a slight headache, and that was probably from the slam along the
    >back of my neck.
    >
    >I can't claim the helmet saved my life, and I make no statistical observations or generalizations
    >about anybody else's life. However, I will say, I was damned glad I had it on when I hit. Better it
    >got the impact and the scrapes than my head. This may not be meaningful in a statistical sense, but
    >frankly I don't care.

    My thinking is that helmets are designed for situations exactly like this. Your head hits the ground
    in a quick tumble and you did not hit anything else. That forward speed is converted into road rash,
    the vertical fall results in a knock on the head. Dropping something from a height 6 feet results in
    an impact velocity of about 13mph which corresponds nicely to the 14mph figure which is used in
    helmet design.

    Glad you are OK.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  7. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 03 Apr 2003 22:12:41 -0500, Robin Hubert wrote:
    >
    >
    > > "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> I've been pretty lucky over the years: my personal experience with wrecks in general, and road
    > >> rash in particular, has been fairly limited. There have been a few notable exceptions over the
    > >> years, though: an invisible pothole in '95 that broke my clavicle; the jogger back in '84 who
    > >> zigged left, then crossed in front of me as I was passing right; and there was last Tuesday,
    > >> April 1.
    > >
    > > You deserved that last one. What were you doing passing on the right?
    > >
    >
    > Excuse me - I was on the bike trail, he went off onto the left shoulder of the bike trail, leaving
    > me on his right. I passed him, and as I was doing so, he cut across the bike trail in front of me.
    > So no, I didn't deserve the last one.
    >
    > And incidentally, if you're passing a runner and he goes off to your left, would you propose going
    > even further left to pass him?

    Well, I would slow down and vocalize something to the other individual, then decide what to do after
    they recognized my presence.

    This is the danger of the multi-use path ... not everyone knows or cares to follow the same rules.
    When I ride them, and someone is passing "on yer left!", I answer, "That's the only way!".
     
  8. On Fri, 04 Apr 2003 10:40:04 -0500, Robin Hubert wrote:

    > Well, I would slow down and vocalize something to the other individual, then decide what to do
    > after they recognized my presence.

    Did that. Evidently he changed his mind. Just like a squirrel.

    >
    > This is the danger of the multi-use path ... not everyone knows or cares to follow the same rules.
    > When I ride them, and someone is passing "on yer left!", I answer, "That's the only way!".

    Amen. In fact, what side of the trail _are_ joggers supposed to use, anyway? Pedestrians are
    supposed to be on the left facing traffic, right? Or is that only on highways?

    Worst part, of course, is joggers are so often high on their own endorphins they're hardly in the
    same space-time continuum. God only knows what was in this guy's mind.
     
  9. "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 04 Apr 2003 10:40:04 -0500, Robin Hubert wrote:
    >
    > > Well, I would slow down and vocalize something to the other individual, then decide what to do
    > > after they recognized my presence.
    >
    > Did that. Evidently he changed his mind. Just like a squirrel.
    >
    > >
    > > This is the danger of the multi-use path ... not everyone knows or cares to follow the same
    > > rules. When I ride them, and someone is passing "on yer left!", I answer, "That's the only
    > > way!".
    >
    > Amen. In fact, what side of the trail _are_ joggers supposed to use, anyway? Pedestrians are
    > supposed to be on the left facing traffic, right? Or is that only on highways?
    >
    > Worst part, of course, is joggers are so often high on their own endorphins they're hardly in the
    > same space-time continuum. God only knows what was in this guy's mind.

    There is a multi-use path (actually a road that is blocked off for cars) near here that I ride on
    occasionally because it has such beautiful scenery. I don't mind the many deer and squirrels and
    occasional bobcat. But I have had more near-disasters on it than I have ever had on the road. Kids
    darting in front of me, runners making a sudden U-turn, and always path-blockage by groups of
    walkers. I have learned not to yell out "passing on your left" because too many lurch the wrong way,
    half because they come from countries where they drive on the left, half because they don't speak
    English, and the remaining half because they don't know left from right.

    In my experience, we are safer out on the road with the other vehicles.
     
  10. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Steve Palincsar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 04 Apr 2003 10:40:04 -0500, Robin Hubert wrote:
    >
    > > Well, I would slow down and vocalize something to the other individual, then decide what to do
    > > after they recognized my presence.
    >
    > Did that. Evidently he changed his mind. Just like a squirrel.

    Yeah Stevve, I believe that but you should've slowed enough for it to have not been an incident.

    > >
    > > This is the danger of the multi-use path ... not everyone knows or cares to follow the same
    > > rules. When I ride them, and someone is passing "on yer left!", I answer, "That's the only
    > > way!".
    >
    > Amen. In fact, what side of the trail _are_ joggers supposed to use, anyway? Pedestrians are
    > supposed to be on the left facing traffic, right? Or is that only on highways?

    They ought to stay to the right. I haven't seen a trail rule in the USA at least that says
    otherwise.

    >
    > Worst part, of course, is joggers are so often high on their own endorphins they're hardly in the
    > same space-time continuum. God only knows what was in this guy's mind.

    Oxygen debt.
     
  11. John Albergo

    John Albergo Guest

    --------------050001080201070500020402 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    Robin Hubert wrote:

    >
    >
    >>Amen. In fact, what side of the trail _are_ joggers supposed to use, anyway? Pedestrians are
    >>supposed to be on the left facing traffic, right? Or is that only on highways?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >They ought to stay to the right. I haven't seen a trail rule in the USA at least that says
    >otherwise.
    >
    There's a trail near here that is split into ped/jogger and bike lanes, with a grass median. Great
    idea. Fantastic idea. Then the designers lost their minds and left the final 1/2 mile as a single
    path (same width as the 2 lanes plus median). Guaranteed to generate chaos. Westbound riders
    generally continue right, westbound joggers instinctively veer right now that they're not restricted
    to the "left side" Eastbound riders may be on the left or right, depending on whether or not they
    saw the 1 lane marking indicating bikes to the left as they threaded through the gateposts. Runners
    like to hop on and off the bike lane so they don't get slowed down by peds. Parents take their
    wobbly 4-year-olds to ride a 2-wheeler for the first time 'cause it's "a safe place to ride". The
    vicinity of the split comes right after a curve. Walk your dog. Reminds me of a Calvin and Hobbes
    strip where Calvin sets up his perfect disaster scenario with his toys.

    --------------050001080201070500020402 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta
    http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body>
    <br> <br> Robin Hubert wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite"
    cite="[email protected]"> <pre wrap=""> </pre> <blockquote
    type="cite"> <pre wrap="">Amen. In fact, what side of the trail _are_ joggers supposed to use,
    anyway? Pedestrians are supposed to be on the left facing traffic, right? Or is that only on
    highways? </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> They ought to stay to the right. I haven't seen
    a trail rule in the USA at least that says otherwise.</pre> </blockquote> There's a trail near here
    that is split into ped/jogger and bike lanes, with a grass median. Great idea. Fantastic
    idea. Then the designers lost their minds and left the final 1/2 mile as a single path (same
    width as the 2 lanes plus median). Guaranteed to generate chaos. Westbound riders
    generally continue right, westbound joggers instinctively veer right now that they're not restricted
    to the "left side" Eastbound riders may be on the left or right, depending on whether or not
    they saw the 1 lane marking indicating bikes to the left as they threaded through the gateposts.
    Runners like to hop on and off the bike lane so they don't get slowed down by peds.
    Parents take their wobbly 4-year-olds to ride a 2-wheeler for the first time 'cause it's "a
    safe place to ride". The vicinity of the split comes right after a curve. Walk your dog.
    Reminds me of a Calvin and Hobbes strip where Calvin sets up his perfect disaster scenario
    with his toys. <br> </body> </html>

    --------------050001080201070500020402--
     
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