Road Tires for mountain bike

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Frank, Jun 6, 2003.

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  1. Frank

    Frank Guest

    Any recommendations? The store I go to has Continental Town&Country, and something called Tioga City
    slickers. They are 1.9x26 and 1.95x26 respectively so they can fit my current rims. I'll be taking
    it to work on in the summer, and I'll encounter a 6 KM stretch of highway riding.

    Frank Vancouver, BC
     
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  2. "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Any recommendations? The store I go to has Continental Town&Country, and something called Tioga
    > City slickers. They are 1.9x26 and 1.95x26 respectively so they can fit my current rims. I'll be
    > taking it to work on in the summer, and I'll encounter a 6 KM stretch of highway riding.
    >
    > Frank Vancouver, BC
    >

    I have had a set of the T&C's on a commuter bike for years and am now riding them on local trails.
    I think they are great tires, though not so great for real mountain biking in the loose stuff :)
    Very tough.

    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove .nospam. if replying)
     
  3. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    I have a set of Kenda's hold 100psi and roll fast .Almost like my road bike .

    --
    J/O Trailblazer At large !!
     
  4. Ted

    Ted Guest

    I ride to work every day and i use the Specialized Nimubs tyre which is 1.5 wide :D narrow yes but
    faster, also it has kevlar woven across the top of the tyre to prevent thorns/glass piercing
    through, ive never had a puncture since ive had em ! (6 months now)
     
  5. Ruger9

    Ruger9 Guest

    On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 04:09:32 GMT, "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Any recommendations? The store I go to has Continental Town&Country, and something called Tioga
    >City slickers. They are 1.9x26 and 1.95x26 respectively so they can fit my current rims. I'll be
    >taking it to work on in the summer, and I'll encounter a 6 KM stretch of highway riding.
    >
    >Frank Vancouver, BC
    >

    Specialized Crossroads is a good mix- solid center bead for road, with knobbies on the side for
    better traction in dirt. I've got them on my "hybrid" (I hate that word) road/mtb bike.

    ELi
     
  6. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Any recommendations? The store I go to has Continental Town&Country, and something called Tioga
    >City slickers. They are 1.9x26 and 1.95x26 respectively so they can fit my current rims. I'll be
    >taking it to work on in the summer, and I'll encounter a 6 KM stretch of highway riding.

    I suspect you meant 1.5" and 1.95" (they also come in 1.0 and 1.25" sizes).

    The City Slicker is one of my favorite tires - they have a motorcycle-like profile (not round), and
    seem to grip the road as well or better than any other tire I've ever ridden. They also look wider
    than their stated size, which I like since the 1.95" City Slickers I used to ride (pre-Habanero)
    looked like knobbies when they were rolling. It's great fun to make a roadie think you're passing
    him on a MTB shod with knobbies.

    Also, they're cheap, last a long time, and are relatively immune to flats.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  7. Superslinky

    Superslinky Guest

    Frank said...

    > Any recommendations? The store I go to has Continental Town&Country, and something called Tioga
    > City slickers. They are 1.9x26 and 1.95x26 respectively so they can fit my current rims. I'll be
    > taking it to work on in the summer, and I'll encounter a 6 KM stretch of highway riding.
    >
    > Frank Vancouver, BC

    I've got Michelin Wildgripper Rock tires installed now. They are 1.75" wide and have a tread pattern
    that I think is well designed. They are fast rolling and you can take corners fast on pavement. Most
    semi-slick tires have knobbies on the side which make me nervous taking corners on the road. Either
    that or you get almost no tread at all, which makes trail riding difficult to say the least. The
    Rocks have enough tread to take anything but mud or very loose dirt with ease. MSRP is only $20
    (US). I bought mine at Nashbar.
     
  8. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 19:58:25 GMT, SuperSlinky wrote:

    > I've got Michelin Wildgripper Rock tires installed now. They are 1.75" wide and have a tread
    > pattern that I think is well designed. They are fast rolling and you can take corners fast on
    > pavement.

    I have those on my "road" bike too, and I agree completely. They corner well on pavement at
    high-speed, and the rolling resistance feels as good as the slicks I had previously - and if I want
    to take the bike on some easy trails they work well, too. Slicks are worse than useless off-road
    (they're downright dangerous).

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  9. Frank

    Frank Guest

    I ended up getting the Conti T&C's. Really smooth and quiet compared to my Bontrager
    Connections that came with my Trek4100.. Now questions is.. what PSI should I be running these
    Conti's for the road?

    "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Any recommendations? The store I go to has Continental Town&Country, and something called Tioga
    > City slickers. They are 1.9x26 and 1.95x26 respectively so they can fit my current rims. I'll be
    > taking it to work on in the summer, and I'll encounter a 6 KM stretch of highway riding.
    >
    > Frank Vancouver, BC
     
  10. Frank says:

    >I ended up getting the Conti T&C's. Really smooth and quiet compared to my Bontrager Connections
    >that came with my Trek4100.. Now questions is.. what PSI should I be running these Conti's for
    >the road?
    >

    Please let us know when it's supper time - we'll come and spoon feed you......

    Look on the side of the tyre (or tire, if you like). There will be a range of pressures listed. Try
    it at the highest, then reduce by 5 psi every ride until you find the pressure that best suits you.

    Steve
     
  11. Superslinky

    Superslinky Guest

    Frank said...

    > I ended up getting the Conti T&C's. Really smooth and quiet compared to my Bontrager Connections
    > that came with my Trek4100.. Now questions is.. what PSI should I be running these Conti's for
    > the road?

    Higher pressures have less rolling resistance. Lower pressures ride better, but you have a greater
    risk of getting a pinch flat if you hit something too hard. Look at the side of your tire for the
    pressure range. I like low pressures. I ignore what the tire says and run 35 psi.
     
  12. On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 04:09:32 GMT, "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Any recommendations?

    The cheapest slick or semi-slicks there are! <G>

    I currently have Bontrager semi-slicks that were $5 each at last year's Pedrosfest on my "townie".
    They work great, and I can still toss the bike around on some trails, to a limited extent.

    Barry
     
  13. Ollie

    Ollie Guest

    Specialised fat boys are great. They come in 1.25" and can be inflated to 100psi. This makes them
    very fast. They have no tread, which could be dicy in the wet, one wpuld think, but I haven't had
    any trouble in the three or four years I've been using them. Ollie "B a r r y B u r k e J r ."
    <n/[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 04:09:32 GMT, "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Any recommendations?
    >
    > The cheapest slick or semi-slicks there are! <G>
    >
    > I currently have Bontrager semi-slicks that were $5 each at last year's Pedrosfest on my "townie".
    > They work great, and I can still toss the bike around on some trails, to a limited extent.
    >
    > Barry
     
  14. Ollie wrote:
    > Specialised fat boys are great. They come in 1.25" and can be inflated to 100psi. This makes them
    > very fast.

    Agreed.

    > They have no tread, which could be dicy in the wet, one wpuld think, but I haven't had any trouble
    > in the three or four years I've been using them.

    That is because bicycles are not subject to hydroplanain as car tires are.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tyres.html#hydroplaning
     
  15. Ollie

    Ollie Guest

    Thanks "ClydesdaleMTB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Ollie wrote:
    > > Specialised fat boys are great. They come in 1.25" and can be inflated
    to
    > > 100psi. This makes them very fast.
    >
    > Agreed.
    >
    >
    > > They have no tread, which could be dicy in the wet, one wpuld think, but I haven't had any
    > > trouble in the three
    or
    > > four years I've been using them.
    >
    > That is because bicycles are not subject to hydroplanain as car tires are.
    >
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tyres.html#hydroplaning
     
  16. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Mark Hickey <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:
    >
    > >ClydesdaleMTB says:
    > >
    > >>That is because bicycles are not subject to hydroplanain as car tires are.
    > >
    > >Cars wouldn't be subject to it either if they ran on razor blades at 100 psi
    >
    > Because motorcycle tires are shaped like bike tires, it's really hard to hydroplane them too. I
    > once hit DEEP water at the bottom of an entrance ramp while riding like an idiot in heavy rain
    > (but I did beat all my buddies onto the interstate). The speed was probably between 70 and 80mph
    > (110-125km/h) and the water was deeper than the tires. I just KNEW I was going down, but all that
    > happened was I threw a VERY impressive wake and the force of the water blew all my footpegs into
    > their up position. I haven't worried about hydroplaning on a motorcycle since (not that I'd repeat
    > THAT stunt).
    >
    > Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
    >

    depends on the motorcycle. sport bikes usually have a round profile, where touring and some
    "regular" bikes have a flat faced tread like cars. I would imagine the flat faced treads
    would plane.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  17. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Technician <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mark Hickey <[email protected]> spoke thusly...

    >> Because motorcycle tires are shaped like bike tires, it's really hard to hydroplane them too. I
    >> once hit DEEP water at the bottom of an entrance ramp while riding like an idiot in heavy rain
    >> (but I did beat all my buddies onto the interstate). The speed was probably between 70 and 80mph
    >> (110-125km/h) and the water was deeper than the tires. I just KNEW I was going down, but all that
    >> happened was I threw a VERY impressive wake and the force of the water blew all my footpegs into
    >> their up position. I haven't worried about hydroplaning on a motorcycle since (not that I'd
    >> repeat THAT stunt).

    >depends on the motorcycle. sport bikes usually have a round profile, where touring and some
    >"regular" bikes have a flat faced tread like cars. I would imagine the flat faced treads
    >would plane.

    Hmmmm - I haven't seen square tires on anything other than chopper-type "bad boy bikes" that no one
    would dream of riding in rain (or drizzle, for fear of having to clean all that chrome). Square
    profile tires would be a VERY bad idea for any bike that wasn't built to go in a straight line
    (since the contact patch would get very strange when leaned).

    Where have you seen such a thing? I want to make sure I never take my BMW in there for tires!!! ;-)

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  18. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Mark Hickey <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    > Technician <travi[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Mark Hickey <[email protected]> spoke thusly...
    >
    > >> Because motorcycle tires are shaped like bike tires, it's really hard to hydroplane them too. I
    > >> once hit DEEP water at the bottom of an entrance ramp while riding like an idiot in heavy rain
    > >> (but I did beat all my buddies onto the interstate). The speed was probably between 70 and
    > >> 80mph (110-125km/h) and the water was deeper than the tires. I just KNEW I was going down, but
    > >> all that happened was I threw a VERY impressive wake and the force of the water blew all my
    > >> footpegs into their up position. I haven't worried about hydroplaning on a motorcycle since
    > >> (not that I'd repeat THAT stunt).
    >
    > >depends on the motorcycle. sport bikes usually have a round profile, where touring and some
    > >"regular" bikes have a flat faced tread like cars. I would imagine the flat faced treads
    > >would plane.
    >
    > Hmmmm - I haven't seen square tires on anything other than chopper-type "bad boy bikes" that no
    > one would dream of riding in rain (or drizzle, for fear of having to clean all that chrome).
    > Square profile tires would be a VERY bad idea for any bike that wasn't built to go in a straight
    > line (since the contact patch would get very strange when leaned).
    >
    > Where have you seen such a thing? I want to make sure I never take my BMW in there for
    > tires!!! ;-)
    >
    > Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
    >

    Hmm, could have sworn i see a stock Honda Goldwing with "square tires" as you called them.
    perhaps they were rounder than what they appeared, though i still remember very clearly a flat
    contact surface.
     
  19. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:
    >
    > >ClydesdaleMTB says:
    > >
    > >>That is because bicycles are not subject to hydroplanain as car tires
    are.
    > >
    > >Cars wouldn't be subject to it either if they ran on razor blades at 100
    psi
    >
    > Because motorcycle tires are shaped like bike tires, it's really hard to hydroplane them too. I
    > once hit DEEP water at the bottom of an entrance ramp while riding like an idiot in heavy rain
    > (but I did beat all my buddies onto the interstate). The speed was probably between 70 and 80mph
    > (110-125km/h) and the water was deeper than the tires. I just KNEW I was going down, but all that
    > happened was I threw a VERY impressive wake and the force of the water blew all my footpegs into
    > their up position. I haven't worried about hydroplaning on a motorcycle since (not that I'd repeat
    > THAT stunt).

    Wow - you're such a cool guy! Wish I coulda done that ',;~}~

    Shaun aRe done that once with his arse, after wiping out on a grass bend and sliding at about 40 MPH
    across the 2 foot deep waterlogged field.........whooooooooO! Heheheheheheeeeeeeeeheheheheh.....
     
  20. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote :

    >> I once hit DEEP water at the bottom of an entrance ramp while riding like an idiot in heavy rain
    >> (but I did beat all my buddies onto the interstate). The speed was probably between 70 and 80mph
    >> (110-125km/h) and the water was deeper than the tires. I just KNEW I was going down, but all that
    >> happened was I threw a VERY impressive wake and the force of the water blew all my footpegs into
    >> their up position. I haven't worried about hydroplaning on a motorcycle since (not that I'd
    >> repeat THAT stunt).
    >
    >Wow - you're such a cool guy! Wish I coulda done that ',;~}~

    Naaaah, I woulda been "cool" had I meant to do it.

    The fact is my eyes were as wide as saucers and if there had been a steel rod up my butt I woulda
    pinched it off.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
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