Road Trip to Vernal

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Jd, May 5, 2003.

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  1. Jd

    Jd Guest

    Some of you may have ridden with the crew up there and may know, mountain biking is alive, well and
    quite pure there.

    It all starts right here, Altitude Cycle ( http://www.altitudecycle.com ) in their cool
    new building.

    http://gallery.consumerreview.com/webcrossing/images/042903004.jpg

    Troy Lupcho had a dream and he's now living it, running a bike shop, riding as much singletrack as
    he possibly can and doing both very well. He's always well stocked with good parts, which is a
    desirable thing for those of us who may need a new XT rear mech in where some may consider "the
    middle of nowhere". Altitude is a great place to get trail information as well, selling the
    Northeastern Utah Fat Tire Guide by local ATG and bike photographer Rich Etcherger. It's always a
    down to earth, warm, friendly and homey place, unencumbered by poor attitudes or anything less than
    the desire to make anyone feel they are a most welcome visitor.

    http://gallery.consumerreview.com/webcrossing/images/042903006.jpg

    http://gallery.consumerreview.com/webcrossing/images/042903007.jpg

    Then there are the trails. In the last six years or so, the amount of singletrack that has blossomed
    out of the desert near Vernal is nothing less than amazing. Trail work seems to be a constant there,
    with very few individuals creating a massive amount of trails that are of varying types and
    terrrain. Everything from slickrock to blazing fast desert twisties, to technical ledges, tight
    switchbacks and rock spines, Vernal has it if you venture forth. Vernal also has the special touch
    of creative trail markings, using the discarded products of the American Machine (garbage), as well
    as various sun bleached animal bones that remind one of the delicate balance between life and death
    in the desert.

    Even if you have already visited Vernal in their past fledgling days, some of the changes to
    existing routes have made them even better than they were in the past. The lower section of "Can You
    Moo?" is now void of doubletrack, with over two miles of new narrow, twisty and singlespeedable fun
    added in for extra flavor. With the constant changes being made to existing routes and new routes
    being pioneered, the amount of great riding has gone beyond just a "weekend" length visit.

    Yeah, it's a two and a half hour drive from Fruita, going over probably one of the most undesirable
    wintertime passes in Colorado, but the visits are well worth the time and effort. After waking up to
    a steady rain yesterday, some friends and I made the trip up to Vernal for a day of riding. We drove
    through a springtime early morning blizzard on Douglas Pass, but as we neared the Uintah Basin, the
    skies broke and the Sun came shining through. Our early morning ride was in the Red Fleet area under
    intermittent sprinkles and sunshine. The afternoon fix was in the Can You Moo complex under mostly
    sunny skies, on a narrow hardpack that was akin to Fruita five years ago. We arrived back in the
    Grand Valley late last night to more rain and most assuredly muddy, closed trails. Vernal is always
    an excellent diversion and escape from the trendy hordes that seem to permeate interstate highway
    friendly trail systems of Fruita.

    JD
     
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  2. Tj

    Tj Guest

    "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Some of you may have ridden with the crew up there and may know, mountain biking is alive, well
    > and quite pure there.
    >
    > It all starts right here, Altitude Cycle ( http://www.altitudecycle.com ) in their cool new
    > building.
    >
    > http://gallery.consumerreview.com/webcrossing/images/042903004.jpg
    >
    > Troy Lupcho had a dream and he's now living it, running a bike shop, riding as much singletrack as
    > he possibly can and doing both very well. He's always well stocked with good parts, which is a
    > desirable thing for those of us who may need a new XT rear mech in where some may consider "the
    > middle of nowhere". Altitude is a great place to get trail information as well, selling the
    > Northeastern Utah Fat Tire Guide by local ATG and bike photographer Rich Etcherger. It's always a
    > down to earth, warm, friendly and homey place, unencumbered by poor attitudes or anything less
    > than the desire to make anyone feel they are a most welcome visitor.
    >
    > http://gallery.consumerreview.com/webcrossing/images/042903006.jpg
    >
    > http://gallery.consumerreview.com/webcrossing/images/042903007.jpg
    >
    > Then there are the trails. In the last six years or so, the amount of singletrack that has
    > blossomed out of the desert near Vernal is nothing less than amazing. Trail work seems to be a
    > constant there, with very few individuals creating a massive amount of trails that are of varying
    > types and terrrain. Everything from slickrock to blazing fast desert twisties, to technical
    > ledges, tight switchbacks and rock spines, Vernal has it if you venture forth. Vernal also has the
    > special touch of creative trail markings, using the discarded products of the American Machine
    > (garbage), as well as various sun bleached animal bones that remind one of the delicate balance
    > between life and death in the desert.
    >
    > Even if you have already visited Vernal in their past fledgling days, some of the changes to
    > existing routes have made them even better than they were in the past. The lower section of "Can
    > You Moo?" is now void of doubletrack, with over two miles of new narrow, twisty and
    > singlespeedable fun added in for extra flavor. With the constant changes being made to existing
    > routes and new routes being pioneered, the amount of great riding has gone beyond just a "weekend"
    > length visit.
    >
    > Yeah, it's a two and a half hour drive from Fruita, going over probably one of the most
    > undesirable wintertime passes in Colorado, but the visits are well worth the time and effort.
    > After waking up to a steady rain yesterday, some friends and I made the trip up to Vernal for a
    > day of riding. We drove through a springtime early morning blizzard on Douglas Pass, but as we
    > neared the Uintah Basin, the skies broke and the Sun came shining through. Our early morning ride
    > was in the Red Fleet area under intermittent sprinkles and sunshine. The afternoon fix was in the
    > Can You Moo complex under mostly sunny skies, on a narrow hardpack that was akin to Fruita five
    > years ago. We arrived back in the Grand Valley late last night to more rain and most assuredly
    > muddy, closed trails. Vernal is always an excellent diversion and escape from the trendy hordes
    > that seem to permeate interstate highway friendly trail systems of Fruita.
    >
    > JD

    I was up in Rangely yesterday checking out the opportunities there. Have you ever stoped at the
    petroglyph sites along the highway. There is one that has a trail heading east out of the parking
    lot. I think it is the first stop area coming from Rangely on the left. I did find some places that
    I am going to check out in the next couple of weeks.

    TJ
     
  3. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I was up in Rangely yesterday checking out the opportunities there. Have you ever stoped at the
    > petroglyph sites along the highway. There is one that has a trail heading east out of the parking
    > lot. I think it is the first stop area coming from Rangely on the left. I did find some places
    > that I am going to check out in the next couple of weeks.

    Didja pick up the sandblaster?

    I did a full scope of all of the arch sites a few years ago up there, including the infamous Carrot
    Men. That one you think has a trail dead ends really quickly at a cool sun calendar. I've walked
    all of them.

    There is some fantastic slickrock North of Rangely if you really look for it.

    JD
     
  4. Tj

    Tj Guest

    "JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "TJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I was up in Rangely yesterday checking out the opportunities there.
    Have
    > > you ever stoped at the petroglyph sites along the highway. There is one that has a trail heading
    > > east out of the parking lot. I think it is the first stop area coming from Rangely on the left.
    > > I did find some places that I am going to check out in the next couple of weeks.
    >
    > Didja pick up the sandblaster?
    >
    > I did a full scope of all of the arch sites a few years ago up there, including the infamous
    > Carrot Men. That one you think has a trail dead ends really quickly at a cool sun calendar. I've
    > walked all of them.
    >
    > There is some fantastic slickrock North of Rangely if you really look for it.
    >
    > JD

    I have the sandblaster. You need 30 grit silica sand. Whitewater Building Materials in GJ as it. I
    think they are located on ninth near the tracks.

    TJ
     
  5. The Ogre

    The Ogre Guest

    [email protected] (JD) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Some of you may have ridden with the crew up there and may know, mountain biking is alive, well
    > and quite pure there.

    Thanks for the info JD, I've been considering a trip in that area this summer/ fall and I wanted to
    avoid a lot of the really infested "hot spots". Perhaps this will be a good place to explore for a
    week or at least a couple of days before moving on to Fruita.

    -- The Ogre http://ogrehut.com
     
  6. On 7 May 2003 16:18:43 -0700, [email protected] (The Ogre) wrote:

    > I've been considering a trip in that area this summer/ fall and I wanted to avoid a lot of the
    > really infested "hot spots".

    Where are the really infested "hot spots" in that area?
     
  7. Jd

    Jd Guest

    [email protected] (The Ogre) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (JD) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Some of you may have ridden with the crew up there and may know, mountain biking is alive, well
    > > and quite pure there.
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the info JD, I've been considering a trip in that area this summer/ fall and I wanted
    > to avoid a lot of the really infested "hot spots". Perhaps this will be a good place to explore
    > for a week or at least a couple of days before moving on to Fruita.
    >
    > -- The Ogre http://ogrehut.com

    It's a tad out of the way and that's what gives it the raw charm available there.

    JD
     
  8. The Ogre

    The Ogre Guest

    P e t e F a g e r l i n <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 7 May 2003 16:18:43 -0700, [email protected] (The Ogre) wrote:
    >
    > > I've been considering a trip in that area this summer/ fall and I wanted to avoid a lot of the
    > > really infested "hot spots".
    >
    > Where are the really infested "hot spots" in that area?

    I guess the confusion is with my use of the word 'area'. I was refering to Moab which I have heard
    gets a lot of traffic.

    -- The Ogre
     
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