Road Vs Mountain Bike

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by ebola, Jul 26, 2003.

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  1. W K

    W K Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I eventually bought a road race bike, quite recently actually: 1999. I was expecting it to be
    > different of course, but it far, far exceeded my expectations when it came to speed and handling,
    > but best of all, the ease at which I could cover the longer distances (in reasonable comfort). 40
    > miles felt like 25 on the tourer.

    That sounds a lot like the "feel" makes a huge difference to you. I don't know what you're up to but
    there isn't that much difference - otherwise there would be no such thing as an audax bike.

    Also, can you be sure that you weren't pushing yourself too hard on the tourer? I found it
    interesting that you can cruise along with a low heart rate at a fairly decent speed. On my MTB I
    might be a couple of mph slower for the same effect, but should I attempt to go that little bit
    quicker I'd be buggered in no time at all.
     


  2. Caher

    Caher New Member

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    Wow - if i cold average that on my MTB (with slicks) i would n't bother with a road bike! Moe training methinks.
    Caher
     
  3. Caher

    Caher New Member

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    ....and use the spell checker too!




     
  4. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On 28 Jul 2003 06:00:44 +0950, johnlilley <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Eg: Old fat git (45+ 200lb) 12 miles to work. Nine hills, some 20% + route through the middle of
    > Watford.
    >

    Where? There are a few arrows out towards Sarat but those inclines are so short you can coast up
    them (almost ;-)

    Rickmansworth has a few hard climbs at the end of a 70mile ride on a fixer but I can't believe they
    exceed 10%

    The trouble with the roads round here is that they are just too flat. Last weekend I was up in
    Durham helping renovate a house. I still managed to squeeze in a quick 12mile loop with a few 14%+
    climbs. (And the ride back from Cornsay Colliery to the station was a lovely 21mph average speed
    descent. I didn't notice it was a climb on the way from the station - except the last half mile. I
    had assumed that my 15mph average speed was because it was dark)

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  5. johnlilley wrote:
    > 2) Sister-in-law's, new mountain bike, 18 gears fat knobbly tyres + front suspension : 70 minutes.
    > Felt like I was going backwards.
    >

    Sorry, don't mean to rain on your sisters bike but a new MTB with only 18 gears is most likely not
    something that is of much use anywhere. 18 gears only comes on the cheapest of bikes and they are
    usualy overweight, has frames that are less than stiff and overall not very pleasent.

    I have a 8.5 kg road bike and when comparing it to my 13.5 kg full suspension mountain bike the
    road bike is a lot faster, but when comparing the mountain bike to a average road bike there is not
    much difference and if it's a 3 speed mom-and-pop type of bike the mountain bike is certainly the
    better one.

    Kind regards

    Bruno
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    > Warning - this sig might be out of date :)

    Ah yes, on inspection I see you may be right ;-)

    --
    Guy
    ===

    WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.com
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    W K wrote:

    > 40 miles felt like 25 on the tourer.
    >
    > That sounds a lot like the "feel" makes a huge difference to you. I don't know what you're up to
    > but there isn't that much difference - otherwise there would be no such thing as an audax bike.

    The difference mentioned is the general level of fatigue I feel towards the end of rides and the
    total distances I can cover before feeling bad. I haven't got the equipment to measure it
    scientifically but this is what I've found time and time again. I'm not claiming the speeds are that
    different (40:25).

    > Also, can you be sure that you weren't pushing yourself too hard on the tourer?

    That is a possibility. Maybe I'm not riding the tourer like it's supposed to be ridden. On my longer
    rides, on any bike, I generally just push a little more than "easy" all the time with occasional
    bursts of high intensity cycling. My average speeds were* slower on the tourer yet the effort I put
    in feels the same. Cycling any slower (for any distance) feels unatural and boring to me.

    * I've still got it. Recently completely upgraded with better components so the difference is not
    quite so great but still is considerable.

    ~PB
     
  8. David Marsh

    David Marsh Guest

    [Interleaved quoting: please read to end for all comments] Nigel Heels wrote in uk.rec.cycling:
    about: Re: Road Vs Mountain Bike

    > "Simon Galgut" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> I average 18 mph on my mountain bike and 21mph on my road bike on a 25 mile commute. The mountain
    >> bike is on 2.1" knobblies and is undergeared for the road and this is the main difference.

    That's a _long_ commute and so probably one of the few (non-competitive) cases where such a marginal
    increase in speed would make a real difference.

    I prefer to think that I get an _overall_ higher average speed with semi-knobblies on my mountain
    bike, as that way, with somewhat less easily-damaged tires I don't have to trash my average speed
    (over an extended period) with too many damned stops to repair punctures. It's all the having to
    take time out to repair punctures that _really_ kills your average speed ;-/

    Right now I'm running with a rather nice Specialized Crossroads semi-knobbly on the rear, which has
    a reasonable amount of smooth tread in the centre for road use, with good knobblies for off-road
    use, but despite that it doesn't seem to have reduced my speed at all. And with a lesser area of
    smooth tread in contact with the tarmac, it presents much less of a target for attracting glass.

    I'm so impressed with this, that, when it packs in, I'll replace my somewhat more glass-loving and
    much more semi-slick front tyre with a Crossroads as well, I think. There's no point in having a
    marginal 'occasional' speed increase with a 'too-slick' tyre, if you have to spend precious time
    every other weekend fixing it for punctures! :-(

    Having said that, I definitely would _not_ recommend using full-on knobblies on an MTB used
    frequently on road (as most budget MTBs (which rarely go offroad!) tend to be shipped with). That
    *really* does drag and slow you right down!

    > Yah buy look at the difference in the effort you put in. A mountain bike uses alot more energy at
    > 20 mph then a road bike at the same speed, because of aerodynamics and weight.

    Excellent! So that means I get more of a workout and more exercise and become more fit for the same
    journey? ;-) Brilliant!

    > Also using a mountain bike on the road wears the tires...

    Only if they're super-knobblies which aren't a good idea for onroad use anyway..

    I think I have the best all-round set up with an MTB with semi-knobblies.. (unless I was going for
    racing-style riding, which I'm not)

    --
    David Marsh, <reply-to-email is valid at time of writing> | Edinburgh, Scotland. [en, fr, (de)] |
    http://web.viewport.co.uk/ | Learn usenet and netiquette: read news:news.announce.newusers |
    >Please interleave & trim quotes otherwise your posts will be ignored.<
    begin Outlook is broken: see http://web.viewport.co.uk/doze/outbreak |
     
  9. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Pete Biggs
    <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> writes
    >>> I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    >>> group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?
    >>
    >> Both, seriously. Repair kit takes up very little room. It can be quicker and easier to replace
    >> the tube, but what happens if that one then punctures or is defective?
    >
    >Another reason to carry a spare tube instead of relying solely on repair kit: Tube may get damaged
    >beyond repair (big split or valve debonding, etc). It does happen.

    I if I'm going far from home I often have two spare tubes after the time when on tour I first had a
    split in one tube, and then on the spare tube I used to replace it the valve snapped off. when
    pumping up.......

    Of course I have never had to use both tubes, but you know how it is once this sort of thing has
    happened to you once.

    It happened in Ireland, on the edge of Carrick-on-suir, home town of Sean Kelly (this was in the
    late '80's when he was still riding pro)

    Sunday morning, there I am by the road side trying to fix this puncture, various people going past
    on the way to church. When they come back I'm still there of course having buggered up my tube and
    wondering what to do next, they did suggest trying to get the chap who owns the LBS to open up for
    me, but they realised he would be out on a ride anyway, eventually I bought a tube off a passing US
    cyclist for pound :)

    I had been stuck outside this ladies house, once I was fixed she sent out her daughter to ask if I
    would like to wash and clean up, so I obliged myself, I was then plied with much tea, soda bread and
    cake :) before I went on my way.

    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  10. Tim Woodall wrote:

    > How often do people get punctures normally?

    Shhhhh! If the P+nct+r+ Fairy hears this...

    [Casts nervous glance over shoulder]

    All too frequently. Slow one in the front tyre on Friday (glass). Very fast one in rear tyre on
    Monday (cut in sidewall from unknown assailant). Both tyres Schwalbe Stelvios; riding into
    central London.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  11. Simon Holt

    Simon Holt Guest

    "Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tim Woodall wrote:
    >
    > > How often do people get punctures normally?
    >
    > Shhhhh! If the P+nct+r+ Fairy hears this...
    >
    > [Casts nervous glance over shoulder]
    >
    > All too frequently. Slow one in the front tyre on Friday (glass). Very fast one in rear tyre on
    > Monday (cut in sidewall from unknown assailant). Both tyres Schwalbe Stelvios; riding into
    > central London.
    >
    I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?

    Simon
     
  12. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Simon Holt wrote:
    > I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    > group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?

    Both, seriously. Repair kit takes up very little room. It can be quicker and easier to replace the
    tube, but what happens if that one then punctures or is defective?

    ~PB
     
  13. On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 17:00:47 +0100, "Simon Holt" <[email protected]> in
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    >group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?

    I adhere to Murphy's law which says one day you'll need both!
    --
    If ingnorance is bliss then I am the erm er luckiest thingy in the whatchamacallit. To mail me,
    change the obvious bit to richard
     
  14. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    > Simon Holt wrote:
    >
    >>I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    >>group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?
    >
    >
    > Both, seriously. Repair kit takes up very little room. It can be quicker and easier to replace the
    > tube, but what happens if that one then punctures or is defective?
    >
    > ~PB
    >
    >
    I've a little saddlebag which holds a multitude of allen keys, inner tube, puncture repair kit, tyre
    levers, multitool, keys, phone. That way, I'm never without either option.

    Velvet
     
  15. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    >> I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    >> group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?
    >
    > Both, seriously. Repair kit takes up very little room. It can be quicker and easier to replace the
    > tube, but what happens if that one then punctures or is defective?

    Another reason to carry a spare tube instead of relying solely on repair kit: Tube may get damaged
    beyond repair (big split or valve debonding, etc). It does happen.

    ~PB
     
  16. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:

    > On Wed, 30 Jul 2003 17:00:47 +0100, "Simon Holt" <[email protected]> in
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    >>group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?
    >
    >
    > I adhere to Murphy's law which says one day you'll need both!

    I know a man who's needed both twice in the last two years. His name isn't Murphy, though.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  17. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 11:56:21 +0100, David Marsh <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I prefer to think that I get an _overall_ higher average speed with semi-knobblies on my mountain
    > bike, as that way, with somewhat less easily-damaged tires I don't have to trash my average speed
    > (over an extended period) with too many damned stops to repair punctures. It's all the having to
    > take time out to repair punctures that _really_ kills your average speed ;-/
    >
    How often to people get punctures normally? I've had one puncture while out on the road in the last
    two years, one puncture while a bike was hung up in the shed (new rim tape needed me thinks) and one
    tyre that went soft over the course of a Sunday ride but has subsequently remained fine (I assume
    the valve was sticking slightly after pumping it up in the morning before the ride). In total I
    would guess I have done 7000 miles, 5000 since the last puncture in the last two years- I NEVER ride
    on green kleptonite in the wet any more!

    I've done about 3500 miles on a road bike 1x700Cx20 michellin and 1x700Cx20 vittoria (The rear
    vittoria needed replacing after the puncture - the inner tube was escaping through the cut in the
    tyre) and about 1500 miles on a windcheetah 26x1.25 Avocet Fasgrip on the rear, unknown on the front
    since the last puncture.

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  18. In message <[email protected]>, Simon Holt
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"Dave Larrington" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> Tim Woodall wrote:
    >>
    >> > How often do people get punctures normally?
    >>
    >> Shhhhh! If the P+nct+r+ Fairy hears this...
    >>
    >> [Casts nervous glance over shoulder]
    >>
    >> All too frequently. Slow one in the front tyre on Friday (glass). Very fast one in rear tyre on
    >> Monday (cut in sidewall from unknown assailant). Both tyres Schwalbe Stelvios; riding into
    >> central London.
    >>
    >I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    >group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?
    >

    Both. I carry a tube, plastic levers and Park Tool puncture patches (v. small, no glue tube needed).

    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  19. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Simon Holt wrote:

    > I've just started cycling again after 30+ years. Not had a puncture yet so I'd appreciate the
    > group's advice - is it better to carry a spare tube than a repair kit?

    Another vote for "both". I usually change the tube and then repair the hole once I've got home as it
    just keeps everything quicker, but since you'll need a set of levers anyway you might just as well
    add a couple of patches, a tube of rubber solution and a bit of sandpaper and save carrying all your
    eggs in one basket.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  20. Simon Holt

    Simon Holt Guest

    Thanks for all your various inputs. This newsgroup seems to have a very active and knowledgeable
    population compared to some!

    I'll certainly get myself a tube or two this weekend to add to the repair kit.

    I've seen some quick-fix products (sealing foam; gas cylinders) but I'm wary - am I right to be?
     
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