Roast Lamb Shank

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Rob, Feb 25, 2004.

  1. Rob

    Rob Guest

    I had "7 hour roasted lamb shank" in a french country style restaurant. It was superb - the meat
    looked dry but was actually very succulent - also amazingly tender (a bit like pulled pork).

    I've since tried repeating it at home - but most recipes are based on braising in a liquid. But the
    meat texture is not the same.

    Does anyone have a recipe or is it a question of putting the shanks in an oven for 7 hrs on the
    lowest heat setting!

    TIA
     
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  2. On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 17:16:05 -0000, "Rob" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I had "7 hour roasted lamb shank" in a french country style restaurant. It was superb - the meat
    >looked dry but was actually very succulent - also amazingly tender (a bit like pulled pork).
    >
    >I've since tried repeating it at home - but most recipes are based on braising in a liquid. But the
    >meat texture is not the same.
    >
    >Does anyone have a recipe or is it a question of putting the shanks in an oven for 7 hrs on the
    >lowest heat setting!

    We have done it as described in Richard Olney's "Simple French Food" for years. We have never had to
    add liquid, probably because the transparent lid on the Calphalon saute pan fits very well.

    There is a half-cup of white wine in the pan, but almost all moisture returns from the lid and keeps
    it from drying out completely.

    All else is 3 TBS olive oil, salt, 15 to 20 cloves unpeeled garlic, pepper.

    Depending on how long it cooks, it does start falling off the bone like pulled pork. Mashing the
    garlic through a strainer and stirring with the pan juices makes a nice sauce.

    It may be possible to roast it dry, but you will have to find out by (sacrificial) testing in
    your own oven to find out. I would expect it to get dry, but I am not a noted chef, nor do I play
    one on TV.

    Good luck

    Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a

    "Accordions don't play 'Lady of Spain.' People play 'Lady of Spain."
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Rodney Myrvaagnes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 17:16:05 -0000, "Rob" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I had "7 hour roasted lamb shank" in a french country style restaurant.
    It
    > >was superb - the meat looked dry but was actually very succulent - also amazingly tender (a bit
    > >like pulled pork).
    > >
    > >I've since tried repeating it at home - but most recipes are based on braising in a liquid. But
    > >the meat texture is not the same.
    > >
    > >Does anyone have a recipe or is it a question of putting the shanks in an oven for 7 hrs on the
    > >lowest heat setting!
    >
    > We have done it as described in Richard Olney's "Simple French Food" for years. We have never had
    > to add liquid, probably because the transparent lid on the Calphalon saute pan fits very well.
    >
    > There is a half-cup of white wine in the pan, but almost all moisture returns from the lid and
    > keeps it from drying out completely.
    >
    > All else is 3 TBS olive oil, salt, 15 to 20 cloves unpeeled garlic, pepper.
    >
    > Depending on how long it cooks, it does start falling off the bone like pulled pork. Mashing the
    > garlic through a strainer and stirring with the pan juices makes a nice sauce.
    >
    > It may be possible to roast it dry, but you will have to find out by (sacrificial) testing in
    > your own oven to find out. I would expect it to get dry, but I am not a noted chef, nor do I play
    > one on TV.
    >

    Could you please post that recipe? It sounds great.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  4. On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 23:06:17 GMT, "Peter Aitken"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Rodney Myrvaagnes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> We have done it as described in Richard Olney's "Simple French Food" for years. We have never had
    >> to add liquid, probably because the transparent lid on the Calphalon saute pan fits very well.
    >>
    >
    >Could you please post that recipe? It sounds great.

    OK. Please excuse typos. This is from a book, "Simple French Food', by Richard Olney : Atheneum, NY
    1974 ISBN0-689-10575-4

    Shanks with garlic (_Souris_aux_Aulx_)

    (for 4)

    2 or 3 lbs lamb shanks, outside fat removed salt 3 tablespoons olive oil 15 to 20 cloves garlic,
    unpeeled A few tablespoons water, 1/2 teaspoon finely-crumbled mixed dried herbs
    1/2 cup dry white wine Pepper

    Use, if possible, a heavy copper pan of just a size to hold the shanks at their ease. It should have
    a tight-fitting lid. Brown the shanks, salted, lightly in the oil, toss in the garlic, and cook over
    very low heat, covered, turning them occasionally, for about 1 1/2 hours, or longer to be very
    tender. An asbestos pad may be necessary to diperse the heat--the shanks should only very gently
    stew in their own juices. In heavy copper their natural juices will hold for about 1 hour--in other
    metals, for a much shorter time. When all liquid has disappeared and they begin to sizzle in fat,
    add a spoonful of water from time to time so that a film of liquid remains always in the bottom of
    the pan. Sprinkle with herbs after about an hours time.

    As the meat approaches the desired tenderness, stop moistening with water so that all the liquid
    evaporates. When the meat begins to sizzle again in pure fat, remove it to a plate, pour off the
    fat, deglaze the pan with the white wine, scraping and stirring with a wooden spoon to dissolve all
    caramelized adherences, put the juice and garlic through a sieve it rid them of the garlic hulls,
    return to the pan, reduce the liquid to the staccato bubling stage, and return the meat to the pan--
    there should be only enough sauce to just coat the pieces. Grind over pepper to taste.

    end of recipe.

    Comments

    With the Calphalon saute pans, with the really tight-fitting transparent lids, I have never had to
    add water.

    With an ordinary gas range that came with our apt, the flame goes low enough so this can be left
    unwatched for more than an hour.

    I suppose it would work with a slow cooker, but we don't have one.

    We usually use fresh herbs

    Barbara usually cooks some white beans to serve with this.

    Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a

    "Accordions don't play 'Lady of Spain.' People play 'Lady of Spain."
     
  5. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Rob wrote:

    > I had "7 hour roasted lamb shank" in a french country style restaurant. It was superb - the meat
    > looked dry but was actually very succulent - also amazingly tender (a bit like pulled pork).
    >
    > I've since tried repeating it at home - but most recipes are based on braising in a liquid. But
    > the meat texture is not the same.
    >
    > Does anyone have a recipe or is it a question of putting the shanks in an oven for 7 hrs on the
    > lowest heat setting!

    I've seen them done BBQ style. 3 1/2 - 4 hours at 225 F. If I were to do this I'd marinate them and
    then cook with a little smoke.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     
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