Roche and Duffield

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by limerickman, Jul 28, 2007.

  1. whiteboytrash

    whiteboytrash New Member

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    That was a brilliant article and very well written..... you can see why Kimmage won sports writer of the year for London last year...... weaves it into a nice story.... I forgot Rasmussen and Rabobank were one of the last to sign the UCI charter....


     


  2. Zinoviev Letter

    Zinoviev Letter New Member

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    I'm not so sure about that. Kelly is obviously more highly regarded amongst cycling fans, amongst the public at large my experience is that Roche is better known. He won the race everybody knows about and in that amazing year he also won the World Championships and the Giro. Winning the World Championships in any sport always sounds impressive, even in a sport where it isn't actually the most important event, while the Giro is the second most famous race.

    Kelly is very well thought of, but few people who don't know cycling actually understand the scale of his achievements. The various Classics, the TdF points competion and even the Vuelta do not have the name recognition of the Tour, the World Championships or the Giro amongst the ordinary punters. So Kelly is seen an excellent rider, but Roche is a great to the man on the street, while those assessments are likely to be reversed amongst those who follow cycling.

    Either way it is remarkable that a small country with little cycling traditions simultaneously produced two of the top riders of their era. Of course the third besk known Irish cyclist is Paul Kimmage, which certainly means that doping in cycling has been an issue amongst the wider public for much longer than it has been in most other places. It was mainstream national news here long before the Festina affair because an Irish cyclist was talking about at a time when two cyclists were amongst the country's greatest sporting heroes.

    This leads me on to another question: How widespread was doping in the 1980s and what were the substances of choice? My understanding is that EPO and systematic blood doping regimes arrived at the beginning of the 1990s. Obviously doping of some sorts existed long before that, but judging by the difficulties even the best climbers had with the huge climbs prior to the 1990s, whatever substances were in use obviously weren't as widespread or as effective.
     
  3. trucker39

    trucker39 New Member

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    Being an Irishman like Limerickman, i can confirm Sean Kelly is a god in Ireland. Roche also is highly thought of.

    Limerickman...you quoted Sherwin etc at the end of the tour...and quoted them incorrectly. If you must, paraphrase what they said. I was also going to mention that you got young Nicolas's team wrong. Nicolas was broguht up in France all his life, and has dual nationality, but he cycles (proudly) for Ireland.
     
  4. Gregers

    Gregers New Member

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    Primitive blood doping techniques were in use from the early seventies. It's probably true to say that they were not systematically employed by Continental teams till much later, though we do no know that it was used by US riders at the 1984 Olympics. I believe that individuals who were later associated with LA were the drivers behind this. Pre 1990's, anabolics and amphetamines were widely abused almost with impunity. Testing was both sporadic and amateurish (and frequently covered up) and punishments were extremely lenient.
     
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