Rohloff Hubs

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Free, Nov 17, 2003.

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  1. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Sweet:

    My spiel when people ask me about mine is that they're heavy, noisy, less efficient, ungodly
    expensive, that I recently bought a second one, and would never voluntarily go back to
    "normal" gearing.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  2. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > I recently bought a second one, and would never voluntarily go back to "normal" gearing.
    > --
    > PeteCresswell

    Are you serious?? What for???

    I would like to try one, just for curiosity sake, but I don't think I could actually bring myself
    to buy one.
    --
    Slacker
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > RE/
    > >Sweet:
    >
    > My spiel when people ask me about mine is that they're heavy, noisy, less efficient, ungodly
    > expensive, that I recently bought a second one, and would never voluntarily go back to "normal"
    > gearing.

    Interesting...what makes the ownership experience good, though?

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  4. Per LöWdin

    Per LöWdin Guest

    > My spiel when people ask me about mine is that they're heavy, noisy, less efficient, ungodly
    > expensive, that I recently bought a second one, and
    would
    > never voluntarily go back to "normal" gearing.

    Interesting: What are the advantages of Rohloff hubs? Have you had any problems with yours? Or are
    they better on all counts?

    Per http://lowdin.nu
     
  5. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Are you serious?? What for???
    >
    >I would like to try one, just for curiosity sake, but I don't think I could actually bring myself
    >to buy one.

    Here's an ASCII text version of a review I wrote some time ago. The bottom line for me is "Any gear,
    any time".

    ==============================================
    Pros:

    - Wide shifts: Probably a substitute for proper technique, but I can clean inclines that I couldn't
    before. Hammer in to it in, say, gear 8, then jump down to 4, then to 1 as needed.

    Also, on long climbs I like to alternate in and out of the saddle which, for me, is a 3 or 4 gear
    shift on each change. With the der I used to do it a lot less frequently that I really like and in
    the spirit of "Gee, I sure hope I don't miss this shift and take the saddle horn up my butt
    (again...)".

    Now I just snap those wide shifts without even thinking about it. Any time, any place.- I'm always
    in the right gear, since shifting is essentially trivial; seems like shifts take less than a
    fiftieth of a second.

    - No more rear cog problems: no taco'd cogs, no more vines/small branches/grass wrapped around
    the cog/der.

    - It *seems* pretty-much bombproof. Time will tell, but I was spending more time than I cared to
    adjusting my der and bending a cog wheel while riding was a PITA.

    - Greatly-reduced frequency of missed shifts. "Reduced" and not "Zero" because there is a 'gotcha'
    between 7 and 8 dumps you into gear 14 if you forget and shift under load.

    It pops back into the intended gear as soon as the load comes off, but it's nothing you want to make
    a habit of doing.

    - Ability to shift down when stopped. I think I make more than my share of unplanned stops and I
    used to have to lift up the rear wheel and rotate the cranks to get down to a starting gear.

    Also, my technique sucks and probably won't get any better and it's nice to be able approach an
    object and slow way, way down before negotiating it without worrying about getting stuck in too high
    a gear to get over it.

    - I don't have to keep mental track of which chain ring I'm on. Sounds trivial, but I don't have any
    brain cells to spare.

    - Maybe not so much of a strength, but it should be mentioned somewhere that 14 speeds are enough.

    My original 44-32-22 der setup took me from 18.5 to 104.

    With the Rohloff on a 44 I get 19.9 to 104.9 in nice even, uniform 13.8% increments. That's only one
    less gear and, since I never used 104 it's a wash for me.

    With the 38 that I've since gone over to it's 17.2 - 90.6. I don't get spun out in 90.6 until about
    25 mph - and there's no way I can hold that speed for very long anyhow.

    I left the old 32 in the middle position just because it weighs next to nothing and, on a big bump
    sometimes the chain drops (you're supposed to have a front-der-like dingus up there to keep it from
    doing that ....but I never go around to getting one) the 32 catches the chain. Also allows shifting
    down to a usually-ludicrous 14.something if things get really bad....

    Cons:

    - It costs an arm and a leg.

    If my wife ever finds out I spent close to a grand on a rear wheel, she'll start to doubt my sanity.

    - This hub weighs a *lot*. It added 1.9 pounds to my already-heavy bike - same rim/tube/tire/spoke
    gauge. Anybody who says it only adds a pound must be using a really, *really* heavy
    cog/hub/der/shifter setup. I was using SRAM 9.0 with twist shifters.

    - The installation instructions could use a re-write. I'm no rocket scientist, and after studying
    them long enough I pulled it off - but it could have been a *lot* easier.

    - It's heavy. Are you ready for an 8-pound rear wheel?

    - The torque arm mounting that came with it was decidedly un-German (downright kludgey, I'd say...).
    Hose clamps!

    Also sometime during the first hundred miles the little clevis pin that held it all together
    disappeared. Wasn't a catestrophic failure because the normal riding pressure pushes everything
    together.... I probably installed the c-ring keeper wrong or something - but it seems like a weak
    point. Replaced it with a marine shackle set in LocTite.

    I have since discovered that there is a more elegant torque arm setup that Rohloff calls the
    "SpeedBone". Uses the disk brake mount and does not interfere with using a disk brake.

    - It's heavy.

    - It's noisy, especially in gears 1-7. Supposedly this mitigates with age, but it is still an issue
    with me at 1,000 miles.

    - It's definately less efficient in gears 1-8.

    There's a web site somewhere (in German) that supposedly graphs a Rohloff against one of the
    Shimanos and claims no loss in most gears and 1-2% in the lower gears.

    I would disagree with that web site's figures.

    - Did I mention that it's heavy?

    ------------------------------------------------

    Bottom Line:

    This is definately not for everybody and the torque arm thing bugged me until I got the more elegant
    replacement.

    Having said that, I find that me and the Rohloff are a good match.

    I've quickly gotten so used to getting any gear I want any time I want and never having to stop and
    pull brush/branches out of my rear der that I can't imagine going back.

    It also appeals to the exhibitionist in me...

    You, on the other hand, might hate the thing.

    Oh yeah, I amost forgot: it's heavy.
    ==============================================
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  6. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > Oh yeah, I amost forgot: it's heavy.
    > ==============================================
    > --
    > PeteCresswell

    This is what scares me most, and I'm not a weight weenie. I just don't know how my suspension would
    react to that hideous pendulum effect.
    --
    Slacker
     
  7. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >This is what scares me most, and I'm not a weight weenie. I just don't know how my suspension would
    >react to that hideous pendulum effect.

    You've got to hold a front wheel in one hand and a Rohloff-equipped wheel in the other hand to
    believe it....dat suckah be *HEAVY*.....

    OTOH, I've conveniently forgotten how much my rear wheel weighed with a 9-speed cog on it....
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  8. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > >This is what scares me most, and I'm not a weight weenie. I just don't
    know
    > >how my suspension would react to that hideous pendulum effect.
    >
    > You've got to hold a front wheel in one hand and a Rohloff-equipped wheel
    in the
    > other hand to believe it....dat suckah be *HEAVY*.....
    >
    > OTOH, I've conveniently forgotten how much my rear wheel weighed with a
    9-speed
    > cog on it....
    > --
    > PeteCresswell

    Just happen to have one sitting here. Rear wheel (less tire) is 3.5 lbs, and that's a DH wheel. Add
    another 3 lbs for the tire/tube/rear der and we're at 6.5 lbs total on my bathroom scale that rounds
    to the nearest 1/2
    lb. I'm running a 11-25 cog, so it is a bit lighter than your standard MTB cog, but not that much.

    What's the weight on das Pig wheel?
    --
    Slacker
     
  9. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > >This is what scares me most, and I'm not a weight weenie. I just don't
    > know
    > > >how my suspension would react to that hideous pendulum effect.
    > >
    > > You've got to hold a front wheel in one hand and a Rohloff-equipped
    wheel
    > in the
    > > other hand to believe it....dat suckah be *HEAVY*.....
    > >
    > > OTOH, I've conveniently forgotten how much my rear wheel weighed with a
    > 9-speed
    > > cog on it....
    > > --
    > > PeteCresswell
    >
    >
    > Just happen to have one sitting here. Rear wheel (less tire) is 3.5 lbs, and that's a DH wheel.
    > Add another 3 lbs for the tire/tube/rear der and we're at 6.5 lbs total on my bathroom scale that
    > rounds to the nearest 1/2
    > lb. I'm running a 11-25 cog, so it is a bit lighter than your standard
    MTB
    > cog, but not that much.
    >
    > What's the weight on das Pig wheel?
    > --

    That's probably why Nicolai put's the Rolloff in the frame.

    Mike
     
  10. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >What's the weight on das Pig wheel?

    Mavic 618 rim WTB Mutano Raptor tire (55/55) DB Spokes (13/14?)
    2.125" tube Salsa skewer

    3425g * .0022 = 7.5 pounds.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  11. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > RE/
    > >What's the weight on das Pig wheel?
    >
    > Mavic 618 rim WTB Mutano Raptor tire (55/55) DB Spokes (13/14?)
    > 2.125" tube Salsa skewer
    >
    > 3425g * .0022 = 7.5 pounds.
    > --
    > PeteCresswell

    Woooo mama.... actually, that's a bit less than I was guessing, 9 lbs.
    --
    Slacker
     
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