Rohloff Shimano cassette checker... not straight forward

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Deep Thought, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. Deep Thought

    Deep Thought Guest

    Just acquired the Rohloff HG-IG checker and would like to know if there are
    any other users here in order to exchange a couple of usage tips. The
    problem is that it would appear to indicate "variable" results and this is
    causing me concern as it should be fairly cut-and-dry - e.g. is this cog a
    bin-job or not?? The instructions are simple enough - perhaps too simple
    because when it refers to the "test roller" being able to "swing" into and
    out of the tooth pocket it would seem that there is perhaps some very small
    resistance even on very new cassettes - e.g. under 50 miles of gentle road
    use - needs to be allowed for. This seems to be at odds with the literal
    explanation in the user guide. Is it advisable to place a litte bit of
    pressure on the last roller before the "test roller" whilst the device is
    under load to make sure it is seated properly WHILST checking the
    "swingability" (sorry) of the test roller because this seems to influence
    results. Also, I assume this check is pointless on anything other than a
    freshly cleaned, spotless cassette (although instructions do not stipulate).
    If we are led to believe the test roller should just drop into the tooth
    pocket under its own weight without being touched by human hand then there
    are going to be an awful lot of people throwing away perfectly good
    equipment.
     
    Tags:


  2. Per Deep Thought:
    > would appear to indicate "variable" results


    I went through the same thing.

    Still unresolved because I haven't ordered a micrometer that's sensitive enough
    to measure the chain links involved.

    But my current suspicion is that it's something to do with the way the tool in
    inserted into the chain. Look closely and you'll see that the tool can be
    bearing on a roller or off to one side where it sort of wedges between the
    roller and the chain plate.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  3. Deep Thought

    Deep Thought Guest

    Further to my last, have been comparing the cogs on a cassette that has over
    2000 miles on it and I know had a problem with chain skip on ONE cog in
    particular when I recently put new chain on it ( I always change chains well
    within 800-1000 miles usage). The Rohloff device showed no difference
    between any of these cogs (I was obviously hoping the one that had been
    causing skip would show up as more worn) - the test roller on all cogs
    required a gentle push to seat it - so do I interpret "gentle" push as
    meaning worn?? I then compared this to the cassette currently fitted to my
    bike and found these also required a "gentle" push on the test roller to
    seat it.
    In short, unless someone can convince me otherwise, this device simply
    introduces more guesswork and questions than it actually answers in relation
    to cog wear. For those of you, like myself, who are looking for a mechanical
    method of gauging cog wear that gives a reasonably clear boundary between
    negligible wear versus wear that will lead to skip and chain wear - forget
    it!!


    "Deep Thought" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Just acquired the Rohloff HG-IG checker and would like to know if there
    > are any other users here in order to exchange a couple of usage tips. The
    > problem is that it would appear to indicate "variable" results and this is
    > causing me concern as it should be fairly cut-and-dry - e.g. is this cog a
    > bin-job or not?? The instructions are simple enough - perhaps too simple
    > because when it refers to the "test roller" being able to "swing" into and
    > out of the tooth pocket it would seem that there is perhaps some very
    > small resistance even on very new cassettes - e.g. under 50 miles of
    > gentle road use - needs to be allowed for. This seems to be at odds with
    > the literal explanation in the user guide. Is it advisable to place a
    > litte bit of pressure on the last roller before the "test roller" whilst
    > the device is under load to make sure it is seated properly WHILST
    > checking the "swingability" (sorry) of the test roller because this seems
    > to influence results. Also, I assume this check is pointless on anything
    > other than a freshly cleaned, spotless cassette (although instructions do
    > not stipulate). If we are led to believe the test roller should just drop
    > into the tooth pocket under its own weight without being touched by human
    > hand then there are going to be an awful lot of people throwing away
    > perfectly good equipment.
    >
    >
    >
     
  4. someone writes:

    > Just acquired the Rohloff HG-IG checker and would like to know if
    > there are any other users here in order to exchange a couple of
    > usage tips. The problem is that it would appear to indicate
    > "variable" results and this is causing me concern as it should be
    > fairly cut-and-dry - e.g. is this cog a bin-job or not?


    Holy schmuck! Now they have an instrument to tell you what occurs
    naturally and without expense. When you put on a new chain and it
    skips under load on a sprocket, you can't use that sprocket. What are
    you going to discover with this instrument? Meanwhile, if the
    instrument says the sprocket is beyond use, yet it works anyway with
    the chain you rare using what do you do now?

    Next they'll come up with a tire tread gauge that tells you when your
    slicks are worn out, something you might recognize anyway when the
    cords start showing.

    Jobst Brandt
     
  5. Deep Thought

    Deep Thought Guest

    ....agree BUT the point is this device would be of particular use when, for
    example, assembling your own cassettes from spare cogs - one would expect
    this device to quickly help you determine which cogs are going to work and
    which are going to throw you off your bike - I like the simplicity of your
    approach but the fact that your theory would probably involve your head
    meeting tarmac before you decide to change your rear-end is a bit too
    old-school for me. Besides, I am a control freak.


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > someone writes:
    >
    >> Just acquired the Rohloff HG-IG checker and would like to know if
    >> there are any other users here in order to exchange a couple of
    >> usage tips. The problem is that it would appear to indicate
    >> "variable" results and this is causing me concern as it should be
    >> fairly cut-and-dry - e.g. is this cog a bin-job or not?

    >
    > Holy schmuck! Now they have an instrument to tell you what occurs
    > naturally and without expense. When you put on a new chain and it
    > skips under load on a sprocket, you can't use that sprocket. What are
    > you going to discover with this instrument? Meanwhile, if the
    > instrument says the sprocket is beyond use, yet it works anyway with
    > the chain you rare using what do you do now?
    >
    > Next they'll come up with a tire tread gauge that tells you when your
    > slicks are worn out, something you might recognize anyway when the
    > cords start showing.
    >
    > Jobst Brandt
     
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