Rolf Vector Comp, Hub disassembly

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Per ElmsäTer, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. How the heck does the hub on the Rolf Vector Comp wheels
    dissasemble? I could attach a 17 mm wrench on each side of
    the hub and unscrew a nut on the driveside. After that I
    found nothing else that was removable. On all other hubs I
    have there are two nuts on each side, but not so on these
    hubs. I dismounted the cassette and still nothing. Do I have
    to remove the freewheel also? And in that case how is that
    done. I just want to clean the hub and put in fresh grease.

    --
    Perre

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  2. Trg

    Trg Guest

    Per Elmsäter wrote:
    > How the heck does the hub on the Rolf Vector Comp wheels
    > dissasemble? I could attach a 17 mm wrench on each side
    > of the hub and unscrew a nut on the driveside. After that
    > I found nothing else that was removable. On all other
    > hubs I have there are two nuts on each side, but not so
    > on these hubs. I dismounted the cassette and still
    > nothing. Do I have to remove the freewheel also? And in
    > that case how is that done. I just want to clean the hub
    > and put in fresh grease.

    I think this is a Hugi hub, no? In that case, you can
    download the tech manual (complete with schematics) from
    http://www.dtswiss.com/index.asp?fuseaction=hubs.bike. No
    sure about which model is used in the VCs. VPs I think
    used the 240.

    HTH
     
  3. trg wrote:
    > Per Elmsäter wrote:
    >> How the heck does the hub on the Rolf Vector Comp wheels
    >> dissasemble? I could attach a 17 mm wrench on each side
    >> of the hub and unscrew a nut on the driveside. After that
    >> I found nothing else that was removable. On all other
    >> hubs I have there are two nuts on each side, but not so
    >> on these hubs. I dismounted the cassette and still
    >> nothing. Do I have to remove the freewheel also? And in
    >> that case how is that done. I just want to clean the hub
    >> and put in fresh grease.
    >
    > I think this is a Hugi hub, no? In that case, you can
    > download the tech manual (complete with schematics) from
    > http://www.dtswiss.com/index.asp?fuseaction=hubs.bike. No
    > sure about which model is used in the VCs. VPs I think
    > used the 240.
    >
    > HTH

    Thanks. It's kind of hard to identify which one I've got.
    Especially since the ones on display seem to have either 28
    or 32 spokeholes. My rear hub has 20 spokes. Upon close
    examination it looks like it cannot be disassembled due to
    the bearings being in a casttette of some kind. Can anybody
    confirm that. It seems to turn nicely. I just wanted to lube
    everything up in preparation for the upcoming season. Maybe
    I can skip these hubs then. However the freewheel seems to
    be a little sticky. Is there any way to dismount just the
    freewheel and regrease it I wonder?

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  4. Dianne_1234

    Dianne_1234 Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 16:44:03 GMT, "Per Elmsäter"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >trg wrote:
    >> Per Elmsäter wrote:
    >>> How the heck does the hub on the Rolf Vector Comp wheels
    >>> dissasemble? I could attach a 17 mm wrench on each side
    >>> of the hub and unscrew a nut on the driveside. After
    >>> that I found nothing else that was removable. On all
    >>> other hubs I have there are two nuts on each side, but
    >>> not so on these hubs. I dismounted the cassette and
    >>> still nothing. Do I have to remove the freewheel also?
    >>> And in that case how is that done. I just want to clean
    >>> the hub and put in fresh grease.
    >>
    >> I think this is a Hugi hub, no? In that case, you can
    >> download the tech manual (complete with schematics) from
    >> http://www.dtswiss.com/index.asp?fuseaction=hubs.bike. No
    >> sure about which model is used in the VCs. VPs I think
    >> used the 240.
    >>
    >> HTH
    >
    >Thanks. It's kind of hard to identify which one I've got.
    >Especially since the ones on display seem to have either 28
    >or 32 spokeholes. My rear hub has 20 spokes. Upon close
    >examination it looks like it cannot be disassembled due to
    >the bearings being in a casttette of some kind. Can anybody
    >confirm that. It seems to turn nicely. I just wanted to
    >lube everything up in preparation for the upcoming season.
    >Maybe I can skip these hubs then. However the freewheel
    >seems to be a little sticky. Is there any way to dismount
    >just the freewheel and regrease it I wonder?

    You probably have the Onyx internals. But I agree you can
    probably skip the overhaul -- the bearings are very durable.
     
  5. dianne_1234 wrote:
    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 16:44:03 GMT, "Per Elmsäter"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> trg wrote:
    >>> Per Elmsäter wrote:
    >>>> How the heck does the hub on the Rolf Vector Comp
    >>>> wheels dissasemble? I could attach a 17 mm wrench on
    >>>> each side of the hub and unscrew a nut on the
    >>>> driveside. After that I found nothing else that was
    >>>> removable. On all other hubs I have there are two nuts
    >>>> on each side, but not so on these hubs. I dismounted
    >>>> the cassette and still nothing. Do I have to remove the
    >>>> freewheel also? And in that case how is that done. I
    >>>> just want to clean the hub and put in fresh grease.
    >>>
    >>> I think this is a Hugi hub, no? In that case, you can
    >>> download the tech manual (complete with schematics) from
    >>> http://www.dtswiss.com/index.asp?fuseaction=hubs.bike.
    >>> No sure about which model is used in the VCs. VPs I
    >>> think used the 240.
    >>>
    >>> HTH
    >>
    >> Thanks. It's kind of hard to identify which one I've got.
    >> Especially since the ones on display seem to have either
    >> 28 or 32 spokeholes. My rear hub has 20 spokes. Upon
    >> close examination it looks like it cannot be disassembled
    >> due to the bearings being in a casttette of some kind.
    >> Can anybody confirm that. It seems to turn nicely. I just
    >> wanted to lube everything up in preparation for the
    >> upcoming season. Maybe I can skip these hubs then.
    >> However the freewheel seems to be a little sticky. Is
    >> there any way to dismount just the freewheel and regrease
    >> it I wonder?
    >
    > You probably have the Onyx internals. But I agree you can
    > probably skip the overhaul -- the bearings are very
    > durable.

    Yes. The Onyx looks fairly much like mine apart from the
    number of holes in the flange of course. According to the
    disassembly instructions it looks like the rotor is just
    lifted off once the nut holding it tight is unscrewed. Maybe
    I was just too cautious?

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  6. Dianne_1234

    Dianne_1234 Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 10:36:36 GMT, "Per Elmsäter"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yes. The Onyx looks fairly much like mine apart from the
    >number of holes in the flange of course. According to the
    >disassembly instructions it looks like the rotor is just
    >lifted off once the nut holding it tight is unscrewed.
    >Maybe I was just too cautious?

    Yep.

    There is a sealed bearing in the outer end of the rotor body
    that's a light press fit onto the axle. Once the nut is off,
    remove the spacer and you'll see it under the seal.

    But I still wouldn't bother taking it apart. Chances of
    damaging the bearings or contaminating the pawls are high
    unless you're meticulous.
     
  7. dianne_1234 wrote:
    > On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 10:36:36 GMT, "Per Elmsäter"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Yes. The Onyx looks fairly much like mine apart from the
    >> number of holes in the flange of course. According to the
    >> disassembly instructions it looks like the rotor is just
    >> lifted off once the nut holding it tight is unscrewed.
    >> Maybe I was just too cautious?
    >
    > Yep.
    >
    > There is a sealed bearing in the outer end of the rotor
    > body that's a light press fit onto the axle. Once the
    > nut is off, remove the spacer and you'll see it under
    > the seal.
    >
    > But I still wouldn't bother taking it apart. Chances of
    > damaging the bearings or contaminating the pawls are high
    > unless you're meticulous.

    Fine it looks like we are talking about the same thing and
    also that you know what you are talking about ;) My wheel
    seems to rotate really fine on the bearings. However the
    rotor does not feel like it is rotating as freely as others
    I've got. Is this the way it's supposed to be on this model
    with no load on it, or do you think it would benefit from
    opening and applying some grease. Imagine laying the wheel
    horizontal with the rotor down and holding on to the rotor
    only. When I set the wheel spinning it won't go on and on
    and on like I'd like to see
    it. It'll spin for maybe 10 seconds ( no tire ) maybe twenty
    if I get it going real good. The wheel is fairly fresh.
    Maybe 7-8000 km.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  8. Dianne_1234

    Dianne_1234 Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 14:07:48 GMT, "Per Elmsäter"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My wheel seems to rotate really fine on the bearings.
    >However the rotor does not feel like it is rotating as
    >freely as others I've got. Is this the way it's supposed to
    >be on this model with no load on it, or do you think it
    >would benefit from opening and applying some grease.
    >Imagine laying the wheel horizontal with the rotor down and
    >holding on to the rotor only. When I set the wheel spinning
    >it won't go on and on and on like I'd like to see
    >it. It'll spin for maybe 10 seconds ( no tire ) maybe
    > twenty if I get it going real good. The wheel is fairly
    > fresh. Maybe 7-8000 km.

    Thanks for the clear description.

    I'd still be reluctant to take it apart, because of the
    chances of damaging a cartridge bearing or general
    contamination (unless you're meticulous and enjoy going
    carefully).

    If it were mine, I'd still choose to ride it unopened. When
    the drag increased enough to make the top part of the chain
    slack, then I'd take it apart. That could be years, if ever.
    At that time I'd consider adding a very thin film of
    slippery grease on the rubber seal under the hub flange.
    That's been my experience of where the most drag comes from.
     
  9. Garry Jones

    Garry Jones Guest

    dianne_1234 wrote:

    > If it were mine, I'd still choose to ride it unopened.

    16 years of experience speaking here, if it works - don't
    fix it. It rotates okay on the road, if you suspect any
    problems when you are not on the bike - ignore them. I once
    took a campag record hub apart and paid for it when one of
    the springs managed to dive down the toilet just as another
    family member flushed. (Don't ask).

    Garry Jones English Cyclisg ResIDING in Sweden
     
  10. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    Garry Jones wrote:
    > dianne_1234 wrote:
    >
    >> If it were mine, I'd still choose to ride it unopened.
    >
    > 16 years of experience speaking here, if it works - don't
    > fix it. It rotates okay on the road, if you suspect any
    > problems when you are not on the bike - ignore them. I
    > once took a campag record hub apart and paid for it when
    > one of the springs managed to dive down the toilet just as
    > another family member flushed. (Don't ask).

    Yeah, like we're supposed to let THAT go unexplained!

    Bill "on second thought..." S.
     
  11. dianne_1234 wrote:
    > On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 14:07:48 GMT, "Per Elmsäter"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> My wheel seems to rotate really fine on the bearings.
    >> However the rotor does not feel like it is rotating as
    >> freely as others I've got. Is this the way it's supposed
    >> to be on this model with no load on it, or do you think
    >> it would benefit from opening and applying some grease.
    >> Imagine laying the wheel horizontal with the rotor down
    >> and holding on to the rotor only. When I set the wheel
    >> spinning it won't go on and on and on like I'd like to
    >> see it. It'll spin for maybe 10 seconds ( no tire ) maybe
    >> twenty if I get it going real good. The wheel is fairly
    >> fresh. Maybe 7-8000 km.
    >
    > Thanks for the clear description.
    >
    > I'd still be reluctant to take it apart, because of the
    > chances of damaging a cartridge bearing or general
    > contamination (unless you're meticulous and enjoy going
    > carefully).
    >
    > If it were mine, I'd still choose to ride it unopened.
    > When the drag increased enough to make the top part of the
    > chain slack, then I'd take it apart. That could be years,
    > if ever. At that time I'd consider adding a very thin film
    > of slippery grease on the rubber seal under the hub
    > flange. That's been my experience of where the most drag
    > comes from.

    So be it. Thanks ;)

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  12. S o r n i wrote:
    > Garry Jones wrote:
    >> dianne_1234 wrote:
    >>
    >>> If it were mine, I'd still choose to ride it unopened.
    >>
    >> 16 years of experience speaking here, if it works - don't
    >> fix it. It rotates okay on the road, if you suspect any
    >> problems when you are not on the bike - ignore them. I
    >> once took a campag record hub apart and paid for it when
    >> one of the springs managed to dive down the toilet just
    >> as another family member flushed. (Don't ask).
    >
    > Yeah, like we're supposed to let THAT go unexplained!
    >
    > Bill "on second thought..." S.

    What arouses my curiosity is how and why he paid for it?

    --
    Perre

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