Roll out those lazy, hazy, braising days of winter

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Bob Terwilliger, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. It's cold and foggy here today, so I decided to fire up the oven (instead of
    my furnace) and braise a bunch of stuff. I made foil packets of each of the
    following:

    Beef Shanks
    Penzey's Northwest Seasoning
    Red Wine
    Worcestershire


    Beef Shanks
    Kikkoman Teriyaki Sauce
    Sesame Oil
    Dry Sherry


    Short Ribs (weird cut of short ribs; http://tinyurl.com/koaek is roughly
    what they looked like)
    Penzey's Barbecue of the Americas
    Beer
    Tomato puree


    Short Ribs (what I think of as the "normal" short ribs, like the ones at
    http://tinyurl.com/k9ox3, only the ones I had were only half as long)
    Powdered California Chiles
    Red Wine
    Soy Sauce
    Cumin
    Onion
    Ginger
    Garlic


    Oxtails
    Red Wine
    Five-Spice Powder
    Garlic
    Dark Soy
    Brown Sugar


    I put the oven on 220F and I figure on leaving it for at least four hours.


    Bob
     
    Tags:


  2. Jani - RFC

    Jani - RFC Guest

    One time on Usenet, "Bob Terwilliger" <[email protected]_spammer.biz>
    said:

    <snip, yum!>

    > Short Ribs (weird cut of short ribs; http://tinyurl.com/koaek is roughly
    > what they looked like)


    > Short Ribs (what I think of as the "normal" short ribs, like the ones at
    > http://tinyurl.com/k9ox3, only the ones I had were only half as long)


    That's funny, I'm just the opposite. My mother used to make what
    she called "New England Boiled Dinner", which consisted of short
    ribs like those in your first image (cooked with potatoes, carrots,
    and cabbage). I've missed having it, but the only short ribs I tend
    to see are those in the second photo, which I find strange and rather
    intimidating... ;-)


    --
    JJ (Jani) in WA
    ~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
     
  3. aem

    aem Guest

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > It's cold and foggy here today, so I decided to fire up the oven (instead of
    > my furnace) and braise a bunch of stuff. I made foil packets of each of the
    > following:
    >
    > Beef Shanks [snip]
    > Beef Shanks [snip]
    > Short Ribs [snip]
    > Short Ribs [snip]


    > I put the oven on 220F and I figure on leaving it for at least four hours.
    >

    And then what? Are they then all done, or do you have ways to finish
    each of them?

    I'd be missing the flavor produced by browning the meat, and I'd be
    wanting some boiling to concentrate the wine and reduce the alcohol....
    -aem
     
  4. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Jani - RFC wrote:
    > "Bob Terwilliger"> said:
    > >
    > > Short Ribs (weird cut of short ribs; http://tinyurl.com/koaek is roughly
    > > what they looked like)

    >
    > > Short Ribs (what I think of as the "normal" short ribs, like the ones at
    > > http://tinyurl.com/k9ox3, only the ones I had were only half as long)

    >
    > That's funny, I'm just the opposite. My mother used to make what
    > she called "New England Boiled Dinner", which consisted of short
    > ribs like those in your first image (cooked with potatoes, carrots,
    > and cabbage). I've missed having it, but the only short ribs I tend
    > to see are those in the second photo, which I find strange and rather
    > intimidating... ;-)


    Those first ones are flanken.

    http://www.yellowsheet.com/retail/flankenstyle_ribs.htm

    Sheldon
     
  5. Jani - RFC

    Jani - RFC Guest

    One time on Usenet, "Sheldon" <[email protected]> said:
    > Jani - RFC wrote:
    > > "Bob Terwilliger"> said:
    > > >
    > > > Short Ribs (weird cut of short ribs; http://tinyurl.com/koaek is roughly
    > > > what they looked like)

    > >
    > > > Short Ribs (what I think of as the "normal" short ribs, like the ones at
    > > > http://tinyurl.com/k9ox3, only the ones I had were only half as long)

    > >
    > > That's funny, I'm just the opposite. My mother used to make what
    > > she called "New England Boiled Dinner", which consisted of short
    > > ribs like those in your first image (cooked with potatoes, carrots,
    > > and cabbage). I've missed having it, but the only short ribs I tend
    > > to see are those in the second photo, which I find strange and rather
    > > intimidating... ;-)

    >
    > Those first ones are flanken.
    >
    > http://www.yellowsheet.com/retail/flankenstyle_ribs.htm


    Cool, thanks Sheldon -- I can probably get some now that I know
    what to ask for...


    --
    JJ (Jani) in WA
    ~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
     
  6. Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    >It's cold and foggy here today, so I decided to fire up the oven (instead of
    >my furnace) and braise a bunch of stuff. I made foil packets of each of the
    >following:
    >
    >Beef Shanks
    >Penzey's Northwest Seasoning
    >Red Wine
    >Worcestershire
    >
    >
    >Beef Shanks
    >Kikkoman Teriyaki Sauce
    >Sesame Oil
    >Dry Sherry
    >
    >
    >Short Ribs (weird cut of short ribs; http://tinyurl.com/koaek is roughly
    >what they looked like)
    >Penzey's Barbecue of the Americas
    >Beer
    >Tomato puree
    >
    >
    >Short Ribs (what I think of as the "normal" short ribs, like the ones at
    >http://tinyurl.com/k9ox3, only the ones I had were only half as long)
    >Powdered California Chiles
    >Red Wine
    >Soy Sauce
    >Cumin
    >Onion
    >Ginger
    >Garlic
    >
    >
    >Oxtails
    >Red Wine
    >Five-Spice Powder
    >Garlic
    >Dark Soy
    >Brown Sugar
    >
    >
    >I put the oven on 220F and I figure on leaving it for at least four hours.
    >
    >
    >Bob
    >
    >
    >
    >

    You must have quite a big oven.

    Christine
     
  7. Christine wrote:

    >>Beef Shanks

    <snip>
    >>Beef Shanks

    <snip>
    >>Short Ribs

    <snip>
    >>Short Ribs

    <snip>
    >>Oxtails

    <snip>
    >>
    >> I put the oven on 220F and I figure on leaving it for at least four
    >> hours.
    >>

    > You must have quite a big oven.


    Oh, sorry, I wasn't clear: Each of those things went into a foil packet,
    none of which was very big on its own. All the packets went into the same
    pan. It all fit in a standard 13x9-inch pan, though the packets *did* mound
    over the top of the pan. It was a total of about six to seven pounds (or
    call it 3 kg).

    Bob
     
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