Rollers vs. Trainers

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Powderfinger, Mar 10, 2003.

  1. Powderfinger

    Powderfinger New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2003
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    So what is a better option for a beginner cyclist mainly concerned with increasing cardio endurance - ROLLERS or a TRAINER?

    I'm leaning toward rollers cause it seems like it wouldn't get as boring if you have to maintain balance... any suggestions on a good brand?
     
    Tags:


  2. xavier

    xavier New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2003
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    0
    Rollers in my opinion are far superior to trainers. However I always reccomend the trainers as it may be a steep learning curve on the rollers and most peole out there are impatient and want results immediately.

    So with this said I reccomend the trainers. Stick with something basic with a remote moutn if you want to adjust resistance. I always try to get people to buy Minoura as they have an excellent warranty center in the USA. Many store brands tend to carry not much service or parts but prices may be lower.
     
  3. nferyn

    nferyn New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Superior regarding what exactly? I would rather say that they serve a different purpouse. Rollers are excellent for balance, improving spinning & pedaling technique and recuperation rides, but I don't think they can give you enough resistance to be the best choice for cardio endurance.

    Trainers can give you that resitance, but they are boring, feel a bit unantural and - this is just a guess - may stress your frame a little too much. A TV in front of you and a varied training routine may overcome these annoyances

    Niek
     
  4. xavier

    xavier New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2003
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    0
    Problem I see with trainers is too many people simply sit on them and watch TV and never concentrate on the work out.

    You cannot do this on rollers. Rollers are used to work on spinning and great for warm up and cool downs. It is an excellent tool.

    Trainers are more to replace the road feel wich many already know can never be immitated.
     
  5. jalabert

    jalabert New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trainers hurt you bike, rollers doesn't!

    Trainers put stress on you frame in a way that it wasn't build for. Use the trainer with you old beat up winterbike, not your beloved summerbike ;)
     
  6. nferyn

    nferyn New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    True, but when most of your training needs to be done inside because of bad weather, or when you come home late after work, it becomes inevitable that you spend long hours on the trainer

    Doing base training for 4-5 hours indoors on the trainer without some distraction can be very boring indeed ;)

    Niek
     
  7. Gistane

    Gistane New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2003
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Geez how can you ride for 4-5hrs on a trainer 30mins is the norm for me then i cant stand it no more
     
  8. nferyn

    nferyn New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just try to do it with a tape of Musseeuw winning Paris-Roubaix last year... might help ;)

    Niek
     
  9. Frejus

    Frejus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree, there are some rollers out there that do have a resistance system.... Tacx who also have different styles right up to a computer model.

    Good point about an old bike because the salt from the sweat gets right into the paint and into all the cables and fittings and destroys your bike. You could put a towel over the handlebars and top tube.

    Great for spinning out and improving your speed.
     
  10. jalabert

    jalabert New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    I see you point with the sweat, but actually my concern is another. I visited the Principia factory with my club some time ago and they told that their warranty didn't cover frame failure due to use in a trainer. The reason being that you apply forces to the frame in a trainer that it wasn't build for. And even though you don't see any signs of damage the frame loose some of it's stiffness.
     
  11. Thorman

    Thorman New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2003
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've got both rollers and a trainer. I think both serve a purpose, but one alone isn't better than the other. I usually use the rollers when I warm up and cool down after lifting and sometimes on longer endurance rides where I'm keeping my HR in Z1-2.

    From what you said you're goal is I would opt for the trainer. If you can afford it I would get both. It also helps to break up the boredom factor when riding indoors. It's nice to switch it up once in a while, especially after the winter we've had this year in NE Ohio.
     
  12. Frejus

    Frejus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes Principia are quite right, I am a frame builder there is another factor to consider as well;

    Trainers require the forks to be locked to a rigid point which does not allow the frame and fork to naturally flex as it would going down the road. With the forks locked out it puts stress's into the frontal area of the frame, but more so at the locked fork tips which do not have the ability to naturally flex as they are designed to do ...as if going down the road. I have seen the tips or drop outs fracture from fatigue.....imagine after a winter training session with your good bike being put back onto the road again the possibility of a fork failure? ALWAYS CHECK YOUR FORKS AND TIPS TO ENSURE THERE IS NO DAMAGE.

    A good reason to use an old bike on trainers which stays on them or if you only have one bike rollers in my view are the best
     
  13. jalabert

    jalabert New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2003
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thx for the explanation :)
     
  14. nferyn

    nferyn New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2002
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unfortunately I can't do that. :(
    As a frame builder, do you have any idea if there are frame materials that are less prone to the dame caused by riding on the trainer. I suspect that aluminium alloys are the most fragile, then steel alloys and that carbon fibre is least impacted by riding on the trainer.

    Niek
     
  15. Frejus

    Frejus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Aluminium is a very rigid material it does not have the ability to flex.....hence aluminium frames giving a very harsh ride ( that why aluminium bikes are now mostly going to carbon forks and back ends. to soften the ride. It is a cheap material to Tig weld together and requires very little cleaning after welding).

    Carbon forks usually have aluminium tips, which are bonded or glued into the fork blade, When in a trainer.......this can cause the glue to fail and the tip loosen or the potential for the auluminium tip itself to fracture............you cannot bend aluminium with out it 'work hardening' ( making it brittle) which can only lead to fracturing. ( thats why aluminium frames have the reputation for short life and failing)

    Chrome moly viz Reynolds, Columbus, Deda, Tange are an exceptionally strong material and have the ability to flex and return to its original shape. It also has the abilty with proper tube selection to give a lively responsive ride. Chrome moly is either brazed (with bronze, silver, ) into lugs or Tig welded....however the fittings and fork ends have to be brazed into the tubing. There are different quality lugs and fork tips these have different quality's of being able to flex. So steel forks have the best qualities.

    What I have done for some people is to get an old commuter 10 speed road style bike.... set up the position as the good bike fitted a good saddle and pedals......you can kick it.... sweat on it....
    and curse it and will keep on doing the job, leaving your lovely road bike for rolling down the road undamaged
     
  16. MGSuarez

    MGSuarez New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do you think this also applies to Ti. frames. (stress) thanks
     
  17. Frejus

    Frejus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Titanium has very similar characteristics as chrome/magnesium/moly steel formula's, it has an elasticity and feel that is unique. Carbon Fibre is pretty good and offers a lot of further development.

    If you are putting a Ti bike into a trainer locking your fork tips. I would recommend you consider alternatives. Ti has some wonder ful characteristics with its longevity, strength and flexibility....but I personally wouldn't put one into a trainer set up.
    Get an olg 10 speed bike of similar proportions and set it up as previously discussed:eek:
     
  18. Frejus

    Frejus New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Another point to remember with Titanium......salt is one mineral that Titanium doesn't like, I have seen some ti frames cable fittings that have been on a trainer discoloured and damaged. Sweat does not only contain salt but other concentrated minerals that are invasive... it is even worse on aluminium and steel.
     
Loading...
Loading...