Romic frames

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Duncan Cooper, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. My riding buddy has a 80's vintage Romic touring frame he really
    likes. It's not really light or stiff, but it fits him perfectly.
    I'm not sure how "high-end" the frame is, but it's equipped with all
    Record components, which sez to me it a may be a fairly high quality
    frame. He wants to update it with a carbon fork, Ergopower shifters
    and a 9 sp cluster.

    Is the frame worth upgrading ? (he's not a racer, but does ride
    centuries)

    Would the rear dropouts need to be spread to accept a modern cassette
    ?

    Hopefully someone out there has crossed this bridge before, and can
    provide some meaningfull insight.

    Thanks

    Coop from Cleveland
     
    Tags:


  2. bfd

    bfd Guest

    [email protected] (Duncan Cooper) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > My riding buddy has a 80's vintage Romic touring frame he really
    > likes. It's not really light or stiff, but it fits him perfectly.
    > I'm not sure how "high-end" the frame is, but it's equipped with all
    > Record components, which sez to me it a may be a fairly high quality
    > frame. He wants to update it with a carbon fork, Ergopower shifters
    > and a 9 sp cluster.
    >
    > Is the frame worth upgrading ? (he's not a racer, but does ride
    > centuries)


    >

    The first thing I would look at is whether the frame fits. If it "fits
    him perfectly" as you state, upgrading parts is not a problem. Alot of
    people *upgrade* to Campy Ergo shifters because of the convenience. If
    he does do this, get a Campy rear der and he could use either a Campy
    hub rear wheel/cassette or a Shimano hub rear wheel/cassette.

    As to *upgrading* to a carbon fork, what does he expect it to do for
    him. Unless he gets a carbon fork with a carbon steerer tube, he's
    won't really save much weigh. Upgrading to a carbon steerer tube will
    also require an aheadset type headset and stem. More money. If he does
    go this route, make sure he knows how high he wants his handlebars
    before cutting the carbon steerer tube.

    > Would the rear dropouts need to be spread to accept a modern cassette
    > ?
    >

    Depends on when the frame was made. If the frame, which I presume is
    steel, has a dropout distances of less than 130mm, he will need to
    spread the frame.
     
  3. On 2004-04-13, Duncan Cooper <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My riding buddy has a 80's vintage Romic touring frame he really
    > likes. It's not really light or stiff, but it fits him perfectly.
    > I'm not sure how "high-end" the frame is, but it's equipped with all
    > Record components, which sez to me it a may be a fairly high quality
    > frame. He wants to update it with a carbon fork, Ergopower shifters
    > and a 9 sp cluster.
    >
    > Is the frame worth upgrading ? (he's not a racer, but does ride
    > centuries)


    Romics are decent frames. Handbuilt, IIRC, but most to off-the-shelf
    specs rather than custom designed. Romic had a small production facility
    in Texas, I believe.

    > Would the rear dropouts need to be spread to accept a modern cassette
    > ?


    For a nine-speed? Most likely, yes.


    --

    -John ([email protected])
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    Duncan Cooper <[email protected]> wrote:
    >My riding buddy has a 80's vintage Romic touring frame he really
    >likes. It's not really light or stiff, but it fits him perfectly.
    >I'm not sure how "high-end" the frame is, but it's equipped with all
    >Record components, which sez to me it a may be a fairly high quality
    >frame. He wants to update it with a carbon fork, Ergopower shifters
    >and a 9 sp cluster.
    >
    >Is the frame worth upgrading ? (he's not a racer, but does ride
    >centuries)


    If he wants ergo shifters and lots of cogs I think that's OK, he
    doesn't have an obligation to make it a museum piece. I really
    like riding bikes with ergo shifters, it's a matter of personal
    choice.

    I'd leave the fork alone, you don't get any added functionality
    from replacing it, and it would drive up the cost of the work a
    lot. It will be expensive enough with just drivetrain parts and
    wheel(s), and the fork will make it ugly.

    >Would the rear dropouts need to be spread to accept a modern cassette
    >?


    Yes, they are probably 126mm if it's a 6-speed bike now. You can just
    cram the wheel in there and ride it, but I prefer to fix it properly
    so the wheel is easy to change.

    --Paul
     
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