Ron Popeil Showtime Rotisserie... ROCKS!!

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Rick & Cyndi, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    Woo-Hoo! Got it yesterday and used it twice - today! WOW!

    I tell ya, it's everything Ron says it to be and more! If Aroma-vision were available during his
    infomercials - factories couldn't build the things fast enough.

    This afternoon I did chicken breasts marinated and infused with WishBone* Italian dressing... WOW! I
    actually made it for friends of ours from church... so I only got to taste drippings as I
    transferred it onto a plate for transporting... even if the drippings tasted 10 times better than
    the chicken breasts themselves... that would still be better than anything I've had at a restaurant.

    For our dinner I did a whole chicken. I infused it with some of the WishBone* Natalie's Nalu
    (remember the dressing offered back in September that was partnered with the Make-A-Wish foundation?
    *That* dressing). So yummy... fork tender... juicy... wish you could have been here terrific! This
    is one machine that will get tons of use. In fact, I had Mom & Dad over and they're considering
    getting one. Mom had mentioned, prior to eating, that they had a George Foreman and it did a good
    job... two bites into the chicken, "Honey, I think we might need to order one of these...". You
    betcha! Awesome machine.

    Love it, love it, love it!
    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply>

    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
    Tags:


  2. Ferrante

    Ferrante Guest

    I bought the new George Forman Contact Roaster a few weeks ago and I just love that. It is small and
    will accommodate a chicken up to five pounds. I bought a whole fryer, rubbed a spice mixture I put
    together in the cavity and cooked it for 70 minutes. I could not believe how delicious it was and
    the chicken was only $3.50, and it was fresh! No more Boston Market or KFC for me.

    I'm glad you're enjoying your new machine!

    Mark Ferrante
     
  3. Levelwave©

    Levelwave© Guest

    Rick & Cyndi wrote:

    > If Aroma-vision were available during his infomercials - factories couldn't build the things
    > fast enough.

    Emeril, is that you? :)

    ~john
     
  4. D.Currie

    D.Currie Guest

    "Rick & Cyndi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s52...
    > Woo-Hoo! Got it yesterday and used it twice - today! WOW!
    >
    > I tell ya, it's everything Ron says it to be and more! If Aroma-vision were available during his
    > infomercials - factories couldn't build the things fast enough.
    >
    > This afternoon I did chicken breasts marinated and infused with WishBone* Italian dressing... WOW!
    > I actually made it for friends of ours from church... so I only got to taste drippings as I
    > transferred it onto a plate for transporting... even if the drippings tasted 10 times better than
    > the chicken breasts themselves... that would still be better than anything I've had at a
    > restaurant.
    >
    > For our dinner I did a whole chicken. I infused it with some of the WishBone* Natalie's Nalu
    > (remember the dressing offered back in September that was partnered with the Make-A-Wish
    > foundation? *That* dressing). So yummy... fork tender... juicy... wish you could have been here
    > terrific! This is one machine that will get tons of use. In fact, I had Mom & Dad over and they're
    > considering getting one. Mom had mentioned, prior to eating, that they had a George Foreman and it
    > did a good job... two bites into the chicken, "Honey, I think we might need to order one of
    > these...". You betcha! Awesome machine.
    >
    > Love it, love it, love it!
    > --
    > Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply>

    Which model did you get? The all look so big in photos, but the measurements seem awfully small.
     
  5. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Levelwave©" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : Rick & Cyndi wrote:
    :
    : > If Aroma-vision were available during his infomercials -
    factories
    : > couldn't build the things fast enough.
    :
    :
    : Emeril, is that you? :)
    :
    : ~john
    =============

    No... that's my brother. <G> Actually, my BIL does look a little like him...!
    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  6. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "D.Currie" & Cyndi"

    : > Woo-Hoo! Got it yesterday and used it twice - today! WOW!
    : >
    : > I tell ya, it's everything Ron says it to be and more! If Aroma-vision were available during his
    : > infomercials -
    factories
    : > couldn't build the things fast enough. Snip<

    You betcha! Awesome machine.
    : >
    : > Love it, love it, love it!
    : > --
    : > Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply>
    :
    : Which model did you get? The all look so big in photos, but the
    measurements
    : seem awfully small.
    :
    : ====

    I got the ST5000 Platinum. Woo-Hoo. It's the size of a larger, kind of tall Toaster Oven.

    It handled 3 chicken breasts that weighed in at 3.7 pounds with ease... I later did a whole bird
    (which probably didn't weigh much more than the 3 breasts... weird, huh?) just wonderfully. I put it
    (whole bird) in lengthwise but could have done 2 birds side by side just as easily.

    Let me tell you one thing - Clean up is..... a BREEZE!! The non-stick surfaces are really non stick!
    I know, that should be a "duh" thing... but some stick more than others... it's wonderful!

    I got mine off of E-bay but the company that I bought it from has their own site:

    www.snappysalesusa.com I don't benefit from any of their sales - although, if they want to send me
    something nice for recommending them... I won't turn it down! The unit was packaged very well and
    the delivery was super fast! Oh, and they followed up already with an E-mail to make sure I was
    happy! From bidding/ordering to delivery was 4 or 5 days.

    I'm extremely pleased with the unit and so far, with the company that sold it.

    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  7. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 23:20:38 -0500, FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought the new George Forman Contact Roaster a few weeks ago and I just love that. It is small
    >and will accommodate a chicken up to five pounds. I bought a whole fryer, rubbed a spice mixture I
    >put together in the cavity and cooked it for 70 minutes. I could not believe how delicious it was
    >and the chicken was only $3.50, and it was fresh! No more Boston Market or KFC for me.
    >

    what's the big deal about roasting a chicken? I cook them at 500 degrees till the leg is a bit loose
    nice and juicy and less then one hour.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See http://www.knight-
    toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  8. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Steve Knight" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 23:20:38 -0500, FERRANTE
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    :
    : >I bought the new George Forman Contact Roaster a few weeks ago
    and I
    : >just love that. It is small and will accommodate a chicken up
    to five
    : >pounds. I bought a whole fryer, rubbed a spice mixture I put
    together
    : >in the cavity and cooked it for 70 minutes. I could not
    believe how
    : >delicious it was and the chicken was only $3.50, and it was
    fresh! No
    : >more Boston Market or KFC for me.
    : >
    :
    : what's the big deal about roasting a chicken? I cook them at
    500 degrees till
    : the leg is a bit loose nice and juicy and less then one hour.
    :
    : --
    : Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
    : =====

    Well... it's not really a "big deal"... but it beats the heck out of heating up my large oven (and
    the kitchen during the summer!). I know, makes no sense...! <shrug> Besides, I love kitchen gadgets
    and appliances. Oh, and of course the 100s of cookbooks to use with all of the above!

    For years I used to poo-poo the idea of a bread machine. Somehow I thought that was "cheating" but
    ya know, after I finally got talked into getting one (funny story) I began to love mine - once I
    finally used it. <G> Anyway, sometimes, as you well know, there are little convenient
    gizmos/gadgets/thingies that once you finally decide to get... you wonder why you didn't get it
    years ago. I don't use my bread machine every month and probably by next year I may only use my
    rotisserie every month or so too... but I will, more than likely, get more than (in my mind) my
    money's worth out of it and I really do like a lot of it's features that make using it more
    convenient than if I threw it in the oven. There is something about "rotisseried" foods that drive
    me wild (in a good way). I don't always remember to baste food in an oven as often as what naturally
    occurs in a rotisserie.

    I don't know... Don't you have some tools that others scratch their heads about, as to why you have
    or need them? <shrug and
    giggle>

    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  9. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, InvisibooNut <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ohh I love my Showtime Rotisserie!

    I used mine again, because of this thread. I cooked a six pound Top Round roast. It was fine.

    The outside was very nicely browned, due no doubt to the radiant heat method that is used.

    It was somewhat overdone for my taste, due no doubt to my inexperience in setting the timer. I
    usually use a Polder remote probe thermometer for stuff like roasts, and I couldn't really do it
    using the rotisserie.

    It was easy to use. But then again, putting a roast on a rack, in a roasting pan, and throwing it
    into the oven is pretty easy too.

    I missed having the drippings available in the bottom of the roasting pan to make gravy with. OTOH,
    the roast was mucho juicy, so I had plenty of au jus.

    Clean-up is easy, because the major pieces all go into the dishwasher. My roasting pan needs to be
    hand washed.

    So the verdict is: Yeah, it works fine. I don't understand why people love them so much, but they
    seem to work about as well as one would expect. I guess I'll use it again, especially when I want to
    get a nice crispy outside onto stuff.

    One question for the popeilophiles out there - what can you cook in it that comes out significantly
    better than any other method of cooking? What is it uniquely superior at doing? Is it the crispy
    outside from the radiant heat that attracts you? Or am I missing some unique aspect? Or is it just
    that it works pretty good and is easy to clean? Or what?

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  10. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : In rec.food.cooking, InvisibooNut <[email protected]> wrote:
    : > Ohh I love my Showtime Rotisserie!
    :
    : I used mine again, because of this thread. I cooked a six
    pound Top Round
    : roast. It was fine.
    :
    : The outside was very nicely browned, due no doubt to the
    radiant heat
    : method that is used.
    :
    : It was somewhat overdone for my taste, due no doubt to my
    inexperience in
    : setting the timer. I usually use a Polder remote probe
    thermometer for
    : stuff like roasts, and I couldn't really do it using the
    rotisserie.
    :
    : It was easy to use. But then again, putting a roast on a rack,
    in a
    : roasting pan, and throwing it into the oven is pretty easy too.
    :
    : I missed having the drippings available in the bottom of the
    roasting pan
    : to make gravy with. OTOH, the roast was mucho juicy, so I had
    plenty of
    : au jus.
    :
    : Clean-up is easy, because the major pieces all go into the
    dishwasher. My
    : roasting pan needs to be hand washed.
    :
    : So the verdict is: Yeah, it works fine. I don't understand
    why people
    : love them so much, but they seem to work about as well as one
    would
    : expect. I guess I'll use it again, especially when I want to
    get a nice
    : crispy outside onto stuff.
    :
    : One question for the popeilophiles out there - what can you
    cook in it
    : that comes out significantly better than any other method of
    cooking?
    : What is it uniquely superior at doing? Is it the crispy
    outside from the
    : radiant heat that attracts you? Or am I missing some unique
    aspect? Or
    : is it just that it works pretty good and is easy to clean? Or
    what?
    :
    ==========

    So far we've done chicken breasts, a whole chicken, and some pork chops. Everything came
    out perfect!

    Juicy on the inside, extremely tender and the perfect crisp or browned outside.

    My likes (LOVE!) for it, so far, are the use of less electricity
    (vs. big oven), cooler kitchen (than big oven), no basting (on my part), weight times "x" minutes
    equals perfect cooking time (so far!), ease of clean up - the non-stick really does what it's
    supposed to, and if I want to put a dish of something on top of the unit to cook or simply
    warm... it's essentially "free cooking heat" since I don't have to use a stove burner or
    microwave. Also, this Saturday the plan is to do a roast - I'm figuring on making a gravy with
    the drippings which, since the drip pan is located several inches away from the meat and from
    the heating element - my guess is that the drippings won't burn as it sometimes can in an
    oven... I know, logically speaking that doesn't make any sense but my brain is saying
    differently after viewing the drippings from the previous uses. This is one of the few
    products that after a couple of uses I'm still not bored with. I look forward to cooking many
    more things with it. In fact, thanks for the reminder, our local p.i.t.a. store still has a
    sale on turkey breasts at $0.79 per pound that should work out very nicely. Woo-hoo, I can't
    wait to try it.

    I dunno what the big love-fest is about... I relate to it as the difference between baking cookies
    and baking a pie. Both require a little prep/mixing time then they both go into the oven. Then comes
    the big difference... you take the cookies out... put in more... take them out... put them in....
    but pies, on the hand, you mix and pour and then bake. Period. You're done. Regular baked chicken
    vs. Rotisserie... same thing... you prep you put them in their respective units... for the chicken
    in the oven you baste... baste... and baste again. The Rotisserie does that all by itself. And, I
    don't worry about did I remember to turn it from "preheat" to "bake" after I put it in... Arrgghh!
    I've done that (left it on preheat) more times than I like to admit to.

    So... there's my reasoning.
    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  11. [email protected] wrote:
    >

    > I missed having the drippings available in the bottom of the roasting pan to make gravy with.
    > OTOH, the roast was mucho juicy, so I had plenty of au jus.
    >

    Put about a half cup of water int he drip pan and you will have a fair amount of dripping in ther
    after the roast is done. I pour them off into a small pan to make gravy.

    >
    > One question for the popeilophiles out there - what can you cook in it that comes out
    > significantly better than any other method of cooking? What is it uniquely superior at doing? Is
    > it the crispy outside from the radiant heat that attracts you? Or am I missing some unique aspect?
    > Or is it just that it works pretty good and is easy to clean? Or what?

    Have you tried a cat?

    I like it for rib eye roast, chicken, and hot dogs/sausages. The differences are subtle in some
    cases, but enough to make a difference. Much of it comes from the crispy outside due to the radiant
    heat. -- Ed [email protected] http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
     
  12. Telmgren

    Telmgren Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In rec.food.cooking, InvisibooNut <[email protected]> wrote: One question for the popeilophiles
    > out there - what can you cook in it that comes out significantly better than any other method of
    > cooking? What is it uniquely superior at doing? Is it the crispy outside from the radiant heat
    > that attracts you? Or am I missing some unique aspect? Or is it just that it works pretty good and
    > is easy to clean? Or what?

    I don't have a Showtime rotisserie, but I have a decent one that was given to me by my MIL. I really
    like roasting chicken in it. The skin is crispy on all sides and the meat is moist and tender. Yum!
     
  13. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Edwin Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Have you tried a cat?

    Not yet, but there's a big hefty one who lives next door ;)

    > I like it for rib eye roast, chicken, and hot dogs/sausages. The differences are subtle in some
    > cases, but enough to make a difference. Much of it comes from the crispy outside due to the
    > radiant heat. --

    How do you do the sausages? Do you use the basket or the skewers? It sounds like it might work GREAT
    for sausages; much easier than slowly cooking them in a saute pan and watching them like a hawk.

    And how long do you cook per pound for a nice rare/medium rare rib eye?

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  14. [email protected] wrote:

    >
    > How do you do the sausages? Do you use the basket or the skewers?

    We put them on the skewers. Even plain old hot dogs come ot better that way. When the casing looks
    nice and done, they are done.

    >
    > And how long do you cook per pound for a nice rare/medium rare rib eye?

    I have no idea as to the per poind, but about 60 to 75 minutes is plenty of time depending on the
    doneness you like.
    --
    Ed [email protected] http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
     
  15. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Edwin Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > > And how long do you cook per pound for a nice rare/medium rare rib eye?

    > I have no idea as to the per poind, but about 60 to 75 minutes is plenty of time depending on the
    > doneness you like.

    That makes perfect sense. I was thinking about the radiant method used, and realized that the
    diameter of the roast is what is important, and not the weight. in a regular oven, the heat comes
    from all sides, so the weight is a proxy for the diameter.

    i was thinking of getting a nice rib eye at BJ's, due to your suggestion. But it was huge, so I was
    thinkng of cutting it in half. It was then that I realized that cooking it for half the time made no
    sense. The diameter would stay the same, as would the distance from the meat to the calrod units.
    All that would change would be the length, which wouldn't matter as far as cooking time is
    concerned.

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  16. Sarah

    Sarah Guest

    I had to come out of lurking for this... I have had my showtime rotisserie
    since the first infomercial. It does a beautiful prime rib and for medium
    rare according to the instructions it should be 18min per pound. This has
    never failed me, good luck!
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In rec.food.cooking, Edwin Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > >
    > > > And how long do you cook per pound for a nice rare/medium rare rib eye?
    >
    > > I have no idea as to the per poind, but about 60 to 75 minutes is plenty
    of
    > > time depending on the doneness you like.
    >
    >
    > That makes perfect sense. I was thinking about the radiant method used, and realized that the
    > diameter of the roast is what is important, and not the weight. in a regular oven, the heat comes
    > from all sides, so the weight is a proxy for the diameter.
    >
    > i was thinking of getting a nice rib eye at BJ's, due to your suggestion. But it was huge, so I
    > was thinkng of cutting it in half. It was then that I realized that cooking it for half the time
    > made no sense. The diameter would stay the same, as would the distance from the meat to the calrod
    > units. All that would change would be the length, which wouldn't matter as far as cooking time is
    > concerned.
    >
    > --
    > ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...
    >
    > - The Who
     
  17. <[email protected]> wrote in message news:c1i473

    > i was thinking of getting a nice rib eye at BJ's, due to your suggestion. But it was huge, so I
    > was thinkng of cutting it in half. It was then that I realized that cooking it for half the time
    > made no sense.

    That is exactly what cut I use and from the same place. I'll cut off a bunch of steaks and save 1/3
    to 1/2 for the roast. I'll be going to BJ's this week. The prices of beef have come down a bit
    already and I want to stock the freezer by May 1st or so when the price of steaks goes up for
    grilling season. Ed
     
  18. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Edwin Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:c1i473

    > > i was thinking of getting a nice rib eye at BJ's, due to your suggestion. But it was huge, so I
    > > was thinkng of cutting it in half. It was then that I realized that cooking it for half the time
    > > made no sense.

    > That is exactly what cut I use and from the same place. I'll cut off a bunch of steaks and save
    > 1/3 to 1/2 for the roast. I'll be going to BJ's this week. The prices of beef have come down a bit
    > already and I want to stock the freezer by May 1st or so when the price of steaks goes up for
    > grilling season.

    BJ's is a great place to buy meat. For the price of cheap cuts of Select meat at the supermarket,
    you can get USDA Choice ribeyes at BJ's.

    The boneless chicken breasts, regular price, are significantly cheaper at BJ's than they are on sale
    at the supermarket.

    I bought a couple of cryovac'ed Tenderloin Butts at BJ's and sliced them into steaks. Nice and
    thick. I counted them, divided that into the purchase price, and realized that they cost me
    $3.00 each.

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
Loading...