Roof carriers

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Steve, Jun 18, 2003.

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  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    Any views or opinions on which is the best style of roof carrier to go for? Bike upright, inverted,
    or with front wheel out? Ads / disads?

    Cheers

    Steve
     
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  2. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Any views or opinions on which is the best style of roof carrier to go
    for?

    Roof carrier in particular? I think rear-mounted carriers are better for the bikes and less noisy in
    use (I have both types).

    Try http://www.roofbox.co.uk by the way - very helpful.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  3. Al_mossah

    Al_mossah Guest

    Steve,

    I've used both. Firstly, I recommend upright rather than upside-down ones. The reason for this is
    that then the bikes are upside down, the widest parts
    (i.e. the handlebars) are all at the same level, thus they interfere with each other. When upright,
    handlebars of smaller bikes are lower than those of bigger bikes, and so you can get more
    bikes on. I get 4 onto a Renault Laguna. You've also got the option of lowering handlebars,
    twisting handlebars or removing pedals if you really want to cram them on. You need to
    position pedals carefully, and practice makes perfect in this!

    Which make to use? I have two types of Halfords ones. Be careful if you buy the type with a hinged
    fixed bar (which seems to be the one which Halfords sell at the moment). The reason to be concerned
    is that if your bike is longer than the distance between your two roofbars (and this distance is
    often fixed due to the design of the car and its roofbars) , the weight of the bikes allows the
    fixed bar to "kink" downwards, reducing its strength.

    I bought two of these hinged ones, threw away the hinged bars and replaced them with 2 chunky Thule
    fixed bars, which is a pretty good solution.

    Putting bikes on the roof is by far the best way to carry them, in my opinion. Be careful when
    pulling into in-laws' drive when their washing lines are across it! Also, car-park height limiters,
    car ferries etc.

    Peter.

    "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Any views or opinions on which is the best style of roof carrier to go
    for?
    > Bike upright, inverted, or with front wheel out? Ads / disads?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Steve
     
  4. >Try http://www.roofbox.co.uk by the way - very helpful.
    >

    Roofbox were great when we bought a tow bar mounted cycle carrier from them last summer.

    However - cautionary tale. We've had problems with the one we bought - a substantial part of it
    dropped off. So we (Vernon & I) have been in contact with Roofbox about replacing the bit that
    dropped off. To put it bluntly - so far it's like getting blood out of a stone. Despite repeated
    phone calls and emails, nothing has been done. To quote one of their staff to Vernon - "Oh we've
    been too busy to look at your problem."

    Needless to say, I'm not impressed. So at the moment I have a three bike carrier that can only
    carry two.

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    This is sent from a redundant email Mail sent to it is dumped My correct one can be gleaned from
    h$**$*$el$**e$n$**$d$**$o$*$t**$$s$**$im$mo$ns*@a$**o$l.c$$*o$*m*$ by getting rid of the
    overdependence on money and fame
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  5. Rg

    Rg Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Any views or opinions on which is the best style of roof carrier to go
    > for?
    >
    >
    > Roof carrier in particular? I think rear-mounted carriers are better for the bikes and less noisy
    > in use (I have both types).
    >
    > Try http://www.roofbox.co.uk by the way - very helpful.
    >
    > --
    > Guy
    > ===
    > I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    > about it perhaps you could think when we talk
    of
    > bicycles, that you see them printing their proud wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
    >
    >

    Have to agree with Guy - the roof mounted jobbies drive you nuts with the noise when travelling at
    any speed (and also have the downside of limitations in car parks etc where there are height
    barriers) - loading is also awkward unless a) you are tall, and b) the bike(s) are light.

    Try the rear mounted ones, especially those that mount on a towball and don't risk damage to the car
    (see the Thule models, esp the 971)

    RG
     
  6. W K

    W K Guest

    "RG" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Have to agree with Guy - the roof mounted jobbies drive you nuts with the noise when travelling at
    > any speed (and also have the downside of limitations in car parks etc where there are height
    > barriers)

    My carrier + bike doesn't make any noise, and fits well under almost all barriers. Its actually just
    a piece of scrap wood with other pieces joined to it that lets the bike rest on its side, on 4 good
    places on the frame.

    > - loading is also awkward unless a) you are tall, and b) the bike(s) are light.

    5 foot 7, bike weighs over 22 kg. It takes a special technique to do it properly!
     
  7. > Any views or opinions on which is the best style of roof carrier to go for? Bike upright,
    > inverted, or with front wheel out? Ads / disads?

    Hi Steve,

    I have a Mont Blanc roof carrier that plonks my bike on top, where it stands upright, and I'm pretty
    pleased with it.

    Pros are:

    - doesn't require any effort to lift the bike onto the roof. Pulling the pole down to hook the bike
    up arms it so that it has the power to lift the bike up on its own.

    - seems very secure. I've whizzed around with the bike on at 60-70mph, and there's never been a
    hint of it wobbling about or threatening to come off. Doesn't make an unacceptable amount of wind
    noise either.

    Cons are:

    - it was expensive (£150).

    - You only get one bike on it.

    - for security, it makes sense to detach and stow the pole when the bike isn't on it. This
    takes space...

    As my car has its spare wheel outside on the back, a roof carrier was my only option. If I were
    choosing for a standard family car, I would probably go for one of the boot-mounted ones that can
    take several bikes.

    HTH Nick
     
  8. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "W K" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > 5 foot 7, bike weighs over 22 kg. It takes a special technique to do it properly!

    Being 6 foot 1 doesn't improve matters that much - I have to load the triplet onto the roof
    single-handed, which is no small task as it is *very* heavy!

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  9. Martin

    Martin Guest

    [email protected] (Steve) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Any views or opinions on which is the best style of roof carrier to go for? Bike upright,
    > inverted, or with front wheel out? Ads / disads?
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Steve

    More by luck than judgement I have ended up with three different types all of which get used
    depending on number of bikes. The Automaxi type bike upside down with saddle in socket and bars
    clamped only really any good for kids bikes as easily adjustable lenghtways and bikes are not too
    heavy so easy to invert. The Halfords gutter type, easy to load but don't like the big clamp which
    is stiff and needs three hands,and prone to swaying side to side. Definite best is the San Marco
    front wheel off job but not very adjustable and you need to store the wheel, which can mean
    bungeeing to frame if boot full (which it probably will be if you are using a rack in the first
    place)also need to be very careful loading forks into front clamp to avoid slipping and expensive
    scratches to paintwork (best for lighter bikes). If you are carrying more than 2 bikes allow for
    bars fouling. Hope this helps.
     
  10. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

  11. Martin

    Martin Guest

    "al_Mossah" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Steve,
    >
    > I've used both. Firstly, I recommend upright rather than upside-down ones.

    Also, the handlebar clamps on upside down ones are not width adjustable so you need to remove
    odometer, lamp brackets, tri bars etc. before you invert bike and find no free area of bar to clamp
    onto (or after if you are a masochist!) Upright generally avoids damage to erogenous zones of bike
    ie saddle and bar tape.

    Roof vs rear carriers is horses for courses: rear ones can be vicious unless fixed to tow bar (who
    has one of them?), especially at hanging points and where they touch the bodywork (I remember a
    friend borrowing my Paddy H for L2B and returning with two nice dimples in his brand spanking new
    Peugeot boot (fortunately company car). Plus you try getting camping booking reference etc out of
    boot of car in queue for campsite on bank holiday weekend with 4 bikes on back!
     
  12. martin wrote:

    > Roof vs rear carriers is horses for courses: rear ones can be vicious unless fixed to tow bar (who
    > has one of them?),

    Me. Every car I've owned has had one. Very useful weapon against the park by ear brigade, plus
    trailers can be quite handy too. But yes, getting stuff out of the boot is a PITA when the bike
    rack is installed.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  13. Steve

    Steve Guest

    Thanks all for replying, very helpful. I actually have a MaxxRaxx towball mounted 4 bike carrier
    which I thought was wonderful. The problem was that I sold my car and forgot to take off the bracket
    off the towbar! Speaking to the company, it will cost me £70 just to get the replacement bits
    required and then I would still have to fork out for a towbar for this car!!! This car already has
    roof rails and I have roof bars for it, which is why I figured that roof mounted could be the way to
    go. Anybody want a MaxxRaxx with some bits missing??

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  14. > However - cautionary tale. We've had problems with the one we bought - a substantial part of it
    > dropped off. So we (Vernon & I) have been in
    contact
    > with Roofbox about replacing the bit that dropped off. To put it bluntly -
    so
    > far it's like getting blood out of a stone. Despite repeated phone calls
    and
    > emails, nothing has been done. To quote one of their staff to Vernon - "Oh we've been too busy to
    > look at your problem."

    And that would be the same 'Roofbox' company that can't be bothered to create a database of racks
    and fittings (even though they publicise it widely on their site), and then don't bother to reply to
    emails asking a simple question of which rack for which car; even though they actively invite those
    questions.

    I went to their website because I saw lots of good things said about them in this forum, but given
    their apathy, I won't be purchasing anything from them...

    Regards,

    Pete.
     
  15. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Thu, 19 Jun 2003 09:45:51 +0100, "Peter Connolly" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I went to their website because I saw lots of good things said about them in this forum, but given
    >their apathy, I won't be purchasing anything from them...

    Maybe they've gone downhill of a suddenly. They were fine when I used them.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  16. Ian wrote:

    > Does anyone carry a bent on a roof mounted rack, if so, which bent and which rack are you using?

    Have done in the past - Kingcycle with Thule carrier of the type which clamps around the downtube of
    an upright. And have also carried a Windcheetah on ordinary roof bars, just tied the wheels to the
    bars with toe-straps (and removed the seat to cut drag.

    The clampy-doofers, though, are limited in the size of tube they can accomodate, so something with a
    fat monotube may not work even if the tube is in the right place.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
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