Rooftop bike carriers

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by [email protected], Nov 14, 2006.

  1. Hi all,

    I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    thought in Oz;

    1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    of the bike with the QR mechanism
    2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    with both wheels attached.

    I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.

    But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.

    So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....

    Thanks,

    Peter
     
    Tags:


  2. Donga

    Donga Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    > thought in Oz;
    >
    > 1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    > of the bike with the QR mechanism
    > 2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    > with both wheels attached.
    >
    > I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    >
    > But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    > bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    > the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    > moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    >
    > So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    > mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    > an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Peter


    Have a think about the low-speed abort too. Many including I have had
    that split-second lapse and driven under a carport. Ouch! I will never
    again put my bike on top of a car. It's the back or inside - let the
    kids sit on the roof.

    Donga
     
  3. DeF

    DeF Guest

    Donga wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>Hi all,
    >>
    >>I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    >>thought in Oz;
    >>
    >>1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    >>of the bike with the QR mechanism
    >>2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    >>with both wheels attached.
    >>
    >>I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    >>
    >>But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    >>bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    >>the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    >>moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    >>
    >>So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    >>mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    >>an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....
    >>
    >>Thanks,
    >>
    >>Peter

    >
    >
    > Have a think about the low-speed abort too. Many including I have had
    > that split-second lapse and driven under a carport. Ouch! I will never
    > again put my bike on top of a car. It's the back or inside - let the
    > kids sit on the roof.
    >
    > Donga
    >


    I'll second Donga's sentiments re roof-top bikes. A past bike of
    mine had a similar incident. Ended up with bent saddle rails, bent
    roof rack *and* a dent in the top of the car! Amazingly, frame and
    wheels fine.

    Of course, the rear bike-beak option isn't a lot better. Another
    bike of mine was slammed into the road as the car went over a
    speed hump (not a good sound). Both wheels tacoed and a bit of
    paint loss.

    Inside is best. The kids can catch the bus.

    DeF.

    --
    e-mail: [email protected] finger.murdoch.edu.au
    To reply, you'll have to remove your finger.
     
  4. Artoi

    Artoi Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    > thought in Oz;
    >
    > 1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    > of the bike with the QR mechanism
    > 2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    > with both wheels attached.
    >
    > I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    >
    > But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    > bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    > the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    > moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    >
    > So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    > mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    > an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....


    Examined all the options before settling on the front fork QR mount
    option. I would stay away with option two as it's less stable with more
    weight and greater height over the rack. The anchor arm in option 2
    typically attaches to the down tube, which isn't ideal given the
    abnormal forces placed on it, especially with these thin walled alu and
    carbon frames. Then there's the rear tow bar/hatch system. Well, the
    idea of a rear impact and road dirt splashed all over the bike didn't
    sound too good to me. As for inside the car, well, it's just not
    practical if you drive a environmentally responsible vehicle.

    So it's back to front fork QR mounting.
    --
     
  5. Bikesoiler

    Bikesoiler New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2003
    Messages:
    392
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    0

    Peter

    I have both types of roof mounting & can say they each work fine. I've never had a bike jump off. My MTB did try a few weeks ago but that was due to me not strapping the wheels down & driving a short way on a bumpy bush track.
    The bike was fine & the rack held it upright, the front wheel managed to jump out of the holder & sat against the cross bar.

    I have very (25mm) nearly driven under a carport with bikes attached. So if you usually park under cover I'd think twice before using a roof top rack.

    My car is parked in the street as a magnet for guano. :(
     
  6. Donga

    Donga Guest

    Artoi wrote:
    >...As for inside the car, well, it's just not
    > practical if you drive a environmentally responsible vehicle.


    Boll*cks. A bike with wheels removed fits into the back seat of a
    Barina or the boot of a corolla sedan. But is that what you call ERV?

    Donga
     
  7. Donga

    Donga Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    > thought in Oz;
    >
    > 1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    > of the bike with the QR mechanism
    > 2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    > with both wheels attached.
    >
    > I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    >
    > But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    > bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    > the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    > moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    >
    > So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    > mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    > an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Peter


    I can't quite figure out these $200+ bike carriers on top of your roof
    racks - more widgets for the sake of consumerism. For years I spaced my
    roof racks the right width, flipped the bike over, lashed the brake
    levers to the front rack and the saddle to the back. Worked fine. Used
    old toe straps for the lashings, but cut up tubes tied in a bow work
    fine too. Try it before you spend you readies.

    Donga
     
  8. Dave Hughes

    Dave Hughes Guest

    On Wed, 15 Nov 2006 00:47:30 -0800, Donga wrote:

    > Boll*cks. A bike with wheels removed fits into the back seat of a
    > Barina or the boot of a corolla sedan. But is that what you call ERV?


    Depends on the bike. I know one of mine is bloody hard to get into an
    Avalon sedan, so I imagine it'd be impossible into a Corolla. That said, I
    know the same bike fits nicely into a Yaris with only one wheel off.
    Huzzah for little cars with fold down seats.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Thus leading us to the obvious conclusion that all software should look
    like a nipple. - Eric the Read
     
  9. spoken4

    spoken4 Guest

    Donga wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    >> thought in Oz;
    >>
    >> 1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    >> of the bike with the QR mechanism
    >> 2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    >> with both wheels attached.
    >>
    >> I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    >>
    >> But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    >> bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    >> the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    >> moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    >>
    >> So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    >> mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    >> an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Peter

    >
    > I can't quite figure out these $200+ bike carriers on top of your roof
    > racks - more widgets for the sake of consumerism. For years I spaced my
    > roof racks the right width, flipped the bike over, lashed the brake
    > levers to the front rack and the saddle to the back. Worked fine. Used
    > old toe straps for the lashings, but cut up tubes tied in a bow work
    > fine too. Try it before you spend you readies.
    >
    > Donga
    >

    You were lucky. We had to use old tree branches as racks with the leaves
    wedged in the doors to hold them on. We tied the bikes on with reeds
    from the lake and after racing, we had to lick the road clean wit tung.
     
  10. Artoi

    Artoi Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Artoi wrote:
    > >...As for inside the car, well, it's just not
    > > practical if you drive a environmentally responsible vehicle.

    >
    > Boll*cks. A bike with wheels removed fits into the back seat of a
    > Barina or the boot of a corolla sedan. But is that what you call ERV?


    ERV refers to exactly those cars.

    Try fitting other luggage or a passenger or two. And then try not to
    scratch seat trims or get any chain muck on your seat.

    The only clean way to carry a bike inside is to either pack it in a
    carrier or have so much space like a SUV and be able to anchor the front
    forks on a QR mount.
    --
     
  11. Artoi

    Artoi Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Artoi wrote:
    > >...As for inside the car, well, it's just not
    > > practical if you drive a environmentally responsible vehicle.

    >
    > Boll*cks. A bike with wheels removed fits into the back seat of a
    > Barina or the boot of a corolla sedan. But is that what you call ERV?


    One more thing, trying to fit a bike frame into the back of a small car
    is like playing with a puzzle. You try different directions and
    orientations to see if you can get a fit. In the process with long
    stretched arms and bent back, it's the perfect posture to give you a
    slipped disc. It's just not worth it.
    --
     
  12. Donga

    Donga Guest

    spoken4 wrote:
    > Donga wrote:
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >> Hi all,
    > >>
    > >> I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    > >> thought in Oz;
    > >>
    > >> 1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    > >> of the bike with the QR mechanism
    > >> 2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    > >> with both wheels attached.
    > >>
    > >> I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    > >>
    > >> But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    > >> bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    > >> the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    > >> moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    > >>
    > >> So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    > >> mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    > >> an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....
    > >>
    > >> Thanks,
    > >>
    > >> Peter

    > >
    > > I can't quite figure out these $200+ bike carriers on top of your roof
    > > racks - more widgets for the sake of consumerism. For years I spaced my
    > > roof racks the right width, flipped the bike over, lashed the brake
    > > levers to the front rack and the saddle to the back. Worked fine. Used
    > > old toe straps for the lashings, but cut up tubes tied in a bow work
    > > fine too. Try it before you spend you readies.
    > >
    > > Donga
    > >

    > You were lucky. We had to use old tree branches as racks with the leaves
    > wedged in the doors to hold them on. We tied the bikes on with reeds
    > from the lake and after racing, we had to lick the road clean wit tung.


    hehehehe
     
  13. Dave Hughes

    Dave Hughes Guest

    On Wed, 15 Nov 2006 10:00:17 +0000, Artoi wrote:

    > Try fitting other luggage or a passenger or two. And then try not to
    > scratch seat trims or get any chain muck on your seat.


    I bummed a lift from a friend. She has a 3 door Yaris, and we fit both
    bikes and the two of us in. It's a new car, but we had a blanket in the
    boot to stop scratches. It also loads fairly flat, so we could just slide
    the bikes out.

    The Outback that we have is useful because you can put the bikes in upright
    and get lots in. That's good when you're taking spares to a race, but not
    something I do often. The only reason we have such a large car is that
    with two kids and lots of crap it gets full very quickly.

    Now, you were saying about SUVs?

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "Please do not ask us to provide anything illegal, since a
    report to your national security service often offends."
    - Security Policy, http://www.ribbands.co.uk
     
  14. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Artoi wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Artoi wrote:
    > > >...As for inside the car, well, it's just not
    > > > practical if you drive a environmentally responsible vehicle.

    > >
    > > Boll*cks. A bike with wheels removed fits into the back seat of a
    > > Barina or the boot of a corolla sedan. But is that what you call ERV?

    >
    > ERV refers to exactly those cars.
    >
    > Try fitting other luggage or a passenger or two. And then try not to
    > scratch seat trims or get any chain muck on your seat.
    >
    > The only clean way to carry a bike inside is to either pack it in a
    > carrier or have so much space like a SUV and be able to anchor the front
    > forks on a QR mount.


    You can always ride it instead :)
     
  15. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Donga wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    > > thought in Oz;
    > >
    > > 1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    > > of the bike with the QR mechanism
    > > 2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    > > with both wheels attached.
    > >
    > > I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    > >
    > > But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    > > bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    > > the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    > > moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    > >
    > > So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    > > mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    > > an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Peter

    >
    > I can't quite figure out these $200+ bike carriers on top of your roof
    > racks - more widgets for the sake of consumerism. For years I spaced my
    > roof racks the right width, flipped the bike over, lashed the brake
    > levers to the front rack and the saddle to the back. Worked fine. Used
    > old toe straps for the lashings, but cut up tubes tied in a bow work
    > fine too. Try it before you spend you readies.


    I made my own rack holders from generic el-cheapo roof racks and some
    old QR hubs I got from the bin at the LBS. Attach the hubs to the
    front rack with something sturdy - I used hose clamps and exhaust
    clamps, and the back wheel to the back rack with occy straps. Worked a
    charm and cost next to nothing.
     
  16. Boostland

    Boostland Guest

    "Artoi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Artoi wrote:
    >> >...As for inside the car, well, it's just not
    >> > practical if you drive a environmentally responsible vehicle.

    >>
    >> Boll*cks. A bike with wheels removed fits into the back seat of a
    >> Barina or the boot of a corolla sedan. But is that what you call ERV?

    >
    > ERV refers to exactly those cars.
    >
    > Try fitting other luggage or a passenger or two. And then try not to
    > scratch seat trims or get any chain muck on your seat.
    >
    > The only clean way to carry a bike inside is to either pack it in a
    > carrier or have so much space like a SUV and be able to anchor the front
    > forks on a QR mount.
    > --


    I have been using a Toyota Hiace van when I need to travel with my bikes, I
    can just put them in the back of it and lean them on the side where I have
    wooden shelves, that fit inbetween the seat and head stem and putting the
    wheels against a 30 cm wide wooden box that runs up the middle.

    They basically stay put even under hard braking and acceloration ( not that
    a 2.8 L diesel has much ), and can withstand normal cornering speeds through
    roundabouts no problems.

    I put my pump and tools in the wooden box that runs up the middle and my
    folding chairs can fit infront of the bikes for when I go track racing.

    I can fit 4 bikes in easy if I wanted to squeeze in some more I could
    probably get 8 or more in with some packing between them.

    If I need to go away I can also take the flat floor board and the matress
    and the back section turns into a bed :p
     
  17. Donga

    Donga Guest

    spoken4 wrote:
    > Donga wrote:
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >> Hi all,
    > >>
    > >> I am in the market for a roof-rack mounted bike carrier. Two trains of
    > >> thought in Oz;
    > >>
    > >> 1- by far the most common way is to use the ones that fasten the front
    > >> of the bike with the QR mechanism
    > >> 2- becoming more common are the units that allow the bike to be mounted
    > >> with both wheels attached.
    > >>
    > >> I much prefer option 2 as it makes more sense to me and is easier.
    > >>
    > >> But, I am a tad concerned about the stability of option 2. I saw some
    > >> bikes recently setup like this and they had a lot of movement going. By
    > >> the same token, I saw another car, with the same setup, that wasn't
    > >> moving at all. I'm guessing the first guy had stuffed something up.
    > >>
    > >> So I'm after opinions from people that have **used** the "option 2"
    > >> mounting system and what they think of it. I just don't want my pride
    > >> an joy coming off around a corner at 110km/hr....
    > >>
    > >> Thanks,
    > >>
    > >> Peter

    > >
    > > I can't quite figure out these $200+ bike carriers on top of your roof
    > > racks - more widgets for the sake of consumerism. For years I spaced my
    > > roof racks the right width, flipped the bike over, lashed the brake
    > > levers to the front rack and the saddle to the back. Worked fine. Used
    > > old toe straps for the lashings, but cut up tubes tied in a bow work
    > > fine too. Try it before you spend you readies.
    > >
    > > Donga
    > >

    > You were lucky. We had to use old tree branches as racks with the leaves
    > wedged in the doors to hold them on. We tied the bikes on with reeds
    > from the lake and after racing, we had to lick the road clean wit tung.


    I hope you put your bikes the right way up. If you put them upside
    down, the oil runs towards the top and the parts wear out faster.
    There's a lot of data on this if you google around a bit.

    Donga
     
  18. frankv

    frankv Guest

    Bleve wrote:

    > I made my own rack holders from generic el-cheapo roof racks and some
    > old QR hubs I got from the bin at the LBS. Attach the hubs to the
    > front rack with something sturdy - I used hose clamps and exhaust
    > clamps, and the back wheel to the back rack with occy straps. Worked a
    > charm and cost next to nothing.


    Have done similar myself and worked quite well. I'll put in a vote for
    toeclip straps as being quite secure.

    Have heard that towbar racks are not recommended for butted tubing as
    the tubing is too thin and not designed for the stresses it encounters,
    especially while cornering.

    Frank
     
  19. Artoi

    Artoi Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]com.au>
    ,
    "Boostland" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have been using a Toyota Hiace van when I need to travel with my bikes...


    You are in a league of your own! :p
    --
     
  20. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    frankv wrote:

    > Bleve wrote:
    >
    > > I made my own rack holders from generic el-cheapo roof racks and some
    > > old QR hubs I got from the bin at the LBS. Attach the hubs to the
    > > front rack with something sturdy - I used hose clamps and exhaust
    > > clamps, and the back wheel to the back rack with occy straps. Worked a
    > > charm and cost next to nothing.

    >
    > Have done similar myself and worked quite well. I'll put in a vote for
    > toeclip straps as being quite secure.
    >
    > Have heard that towbar racks are not recommended for butted tubing as
    > the tubing is too thin and not designed for the stresses it encounters,
    > especially while cornering.


    There's no way I'd clamp my carbon top tube in a towbar rack.
     
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