Rookie Question - Bouncing while Stretching - Why not?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Les Stewart, Sep 22, 2003.

  1. Les Stewart

    Les Stewart Guest

    Just curious as to why you should not bounce while stretching. It seems kind of natural to
    do so to me.

    --
    Les Stewart Beaumont, TX
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, Les Stewart <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Just curious as to why you should not bounce while stretching. It seems kind of natural to do
    > so to me.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Les Stewart Beaumont, TX

    Les,

    There's a stretch reflex that takes place when the muscle is jerked or pulled too hard and
    too quickly.

    If someone handed you a pillow and you thinking it was a pillow and light while it was really a 40
    pound slab of concrete wrapped to look like a pillow, you would experience a stretch reflex in order
    to protect the muscle and the tendon.

    When bouncing, you may be continually triggering the reflex and shortening rather than elongating
    the muscle you so desire.

    In health and on the run, Ozzie Gontang Maintainer - rec.running FAQ Director, San Diego Marathon
    Clinic, est. 1975

    Mindful Running: http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp http://www.faqs.org/faqs/running-faq/
     
  3. Bill Clinton

    Bill Clinton Guest

    On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 14:53:15 -0500, "Les Stewart" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just curious as to why you should not bounce while stretching. It seems kind of natural to do
    >so to me.

    It tears muscle fibers instead of stretching them. And hold all stretches for a mimimum of 40
    seconds, but a minute is better.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, yes, it's me
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 14:53:15 -0500, "Les Stewart" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Just curious as to why you should not bounce while stretching. It seems kind of natural to do
    > >so to me.
    >
    > It tears muscle fibers instead of stretching them. And hold all stretches for a mimimum of 40
    > seconds, but a minute is better.

    some other thoughts:

    Subject: Re: Active Isolated stretching works when done properly Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 17:33:02 GMT

    >"Finally, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) exercises permit further lengthening of
    >an agonist muscle beyond its normal maximal length by stimulating isometric tension in its
    >antagonist counterpart. By appropriate inhibitory interneuronal connections involving both agonist
    >and antagonist muscles via the spinal cord, increased relaxation of tone will occur in the agonist.
    >These PNF exercises can be done either alone or with a partner's assitance (Hatfield 1982)."
    >
    >Doesn't this sound similar, if not the same, to Active-Isolated Stretching? And the source cited
    >from this in the Martin and Coe book is from Hatfield 1982.

    It uses some of the same physiological principles (reciprocal inhibition, mainly) but the
    application, as Ozzie notes, is different. As one who learned PNF stretching and AI stretching
    (during my sports massage training) at about the same time, I saw the connection right away.

    It's really quite remarkable, all the ways the body works.

    Best regards,

    --
    Brian P. Baresch Lawrence, Kansas, USA Professional editing and proofreading

    Another post:

    From: [email protected] (Alex Accetta) Newsgroups: rec.running Subject: Stretching (Active
    Isolated) Date: 18 Dec 1995 10:31:03 -0800 Organization: Willamette University, Salem, OR, USA
    Lines: 47 Message-ID: <[email protected]> NNTP-Posting-Host: gemini.willamette.edu

    In article <[email protected]>, Kerry Kennedy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >[email protected] (John Shoemaker) wrote:
    >
    >>> I'm looking for (good) books about stretching. Specifically, I'm interested in books that give
    >>> variuos stretches and clearly explains how they are done. Suggestions or comments about books
    >>> welcome.
    >
    >>There's a terrific book called "Stretching" by Bob Anderson. You should be able to pick it up at
    >>most book stores. It's an 8 1/2" x 11" x 1/2" paperback. Costs about $10. Gives you stretches for
    >>most sports as well as stretches for morning, at work, etc. I think you'll find it useful.

    Bob Anderson's book on stretching is considered the Old Testament of stretching. It is definitely a
    great source and full of information...BUT, there is a new kid in town, the savior as it were, and
    it is called ACTIVE ISOLATED STRETCHING. It has been a main story in Runner's World, in Running
    Times, Women's Sports and Fitness, the New York Times, and even Elle.

    It is more commonly referred to as ROPE stretching -- the theory is something like this -- old,
    static stretching only went so far in stretching the muscle fibers because of the static motion. In
    AIS stretching there is a lengthening stage, a brief moment of tension and then a release. A rope is
    used to create leverage (much like someone actually stretching you), which contributes to the force
    you can apply on your stretch. This method allows more blood to pour into the area, creating even
    more flexibility for the next stretch. It is an excellent techinique, using it correctly I have not
    been injured in two years. I have also found that if I stretched five times a week, I did not need
    to stretch at other times. It works.

    This form of stretching is being used by, among other people I have seen and known, The Reebok
    Enclave (Terrance Mahan and Brian Clas, 3rd and 8th at XC nationals respectively; the team was
    second), John Trautmann, Tom Nohilly (World Championship Team member), Keith Brantly (King of the
    Roads and damn good everyplace else), Meredith Rainey, and the list goes on and on. Go to a national
    level meet and you will not miss the ROPES. If you need more specific direction, I can help you,
    just drop me an email.

    [email protected]

    peace, alex

    "...LIVING ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS, PHYSICALLY ACTIVE, AND DEEPLY ALIVE."
     
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