Rookie thrift store bike mistake.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by [email protected], Jan 11, 2006.

  1. Dear Folks:
    Made a rookie thift store bike find mistake. The bike itself was a
    honey -- Univega Gran Sprint, lugged steel frame, Suntour Cyclone
    derailleurs, front double Lawee Signature crank, rear 6 cog going from
    about 13 to 28, Dia-Compe 400 sidepulls. Selle Italia saddle. Stem was
    screwed up (like someone had used an English system allen wrench in a
    metric allen bolt), but the lovely white handlebar wrap was almost TOO
    prestine compared to the faded paint on the top-tube (like someone had
    stored in a garage, next to a window). In the thift store, it had just
    barely adequate standover. $49. A few weeks later I got around to
    project-biking it by riding it (up Juan Street!) for a refit at a NOT
    so local bike shop that does a lot of retrofits and refurbs (as opposed
    to repairs).
    When I arrived, we discovered that it had inadequate standover. What
    happened? I'd inflated the tires. Here comes the WORST part: Bike was
    too short for everyone else there, too.
    Eventually I traded it for store credit at a used bike specialist
    (and coffeehouse!) over by 68th and University -- because the quicker
    he can move it, the quicker it can get back on the road with a
    right-sized rider, where it belongs. Any difference between
    prices/opportunity costs I'll chalk up to the expense of education.
    Adding insult to injury, the thrift store I got it at has a new
    pricer -- who's setting Murrays and Huffys at about $125 to start.

    Robert Leone [email protected]
     
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  2. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    who's setting Murrays and Huffys at about $125 to start.
    >


    Well nobody I can think of would pay $125 for a used Murray or Huffy.
    For that price just go to the local X-Mart and pick up something new.
    And maybe even save a few bucks.

    Ken
    --
    Quit? You know, once I was thinking of quitting when I was diagnosed
    with brain, lung and testicular cancer all at the same time. But with
    the love and support of my friends and family, I got back on the bike
    and won the Tour de France five times in a row. But I'm sure you have a
    good reason to quit. So what are you dying of that's keeping you from
    the finals? - Lance Armstrong in "Dodgeball - A true underdog story"

    Homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] writes:

    > Eventually I traded it for store credit at a used bike specialist
    > (and coffeehouse!) over by 68th and University -- because the quicker
    > he can move it, the quicker it can get back on the road with a
    > right-sized rider, where it belongs.


    There ya go. Maybe you were unwittingly pressed into service by
    Mysterious Powers That Be, in order to to guide that bike to where
    its and its future guardian's paths eventually, destinally cross.

    I like to believe in that stuff. It's sort of like that
    "having entertained angels unawares" thing. It's a nice
    way to think about it, anyways.

    I've done (and been the recipient of) a number of give-aways
    in that vein. Sometimes the joy of being the temporary foster
    parent of a bike is in sending it back out into the world, rather
    than the possession of it. I figure if I got selfish and/or greedy
    and started hoarding stuff, it would either stop the flow, or it
    would open the floodgates to the point where I'd be buried under
    more old bikes than I could deal with.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- "You get what you need" -- The Rolling Stones
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
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