rookie wants basic info?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Timmer, Feb 13, 2005.

  1. Timmer

    Timmer New Member

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    Hi, I've been riding a regular road bike for a few years now and due to some misfortune lately I broke my neck. I'm lucky enuf that looks like full recovery. When I get back on the bike I may find it difficult to ride a regular bike. looking for some info, being a rookie to the recumbent scene, short or long wheelbase? big wheels or small? any basic info would be great. Now I would be willing to spend up to 4 grand if need be. I don't want to have to upgrade in future so buying a good bike to start with sounds good to me. I basicly ride to work and have some big hills to climb. weekend cruises are common with me stick to the road. 2-3 thousand mile per year.

    Thanks for any of your input, Tim :rolleyes:
     
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  2. blazingpedals

    blazingpedals New Member

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    Hi Tim. Sorry to hear about the 'misfortune.' Depending on your range of motion, you may want to stick with a more upright seating position, or the amount of recline might be a non-issue. Only you will be able to tell. For hills you want light weight, just like with an upright/DF/wedgie. My first advice would be to test ride, test ride, and test ride. Then come back and ask more questions. If you will be climbing hills, make sure you do them on your test rides. Oh, and you don't have to be seriously looking at a particular model or even style to test ride it - what you're doing is building an experience base. Ride long wheelbases and short wheelbases, and try to represent the price range from cheapies to more than you want to pay. When you're ready to buy, you'll have a good idea of what you want your money to buy.

    Four grand will get you into a lot of choices, from a TourEasy/Gold Rush to virtually all of the RANS, Barcroft, and Burley lineups, and most of the Bacchettas and Lightnings. If your neck can handle recline, it'll even get you into a few speedy imports. Depending on where you live, there might be a good population of bents in your area, or even a good dealer who can help.
     
  3. Bruce in Texas

    Bruce in Texas New Member

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    Tim, Bruce here. I won't presume to tell you what you should get. The best place to find the answers to your questions is to go to www.bentrideronline.com Read the boards, read the reviews of the multitude of bikes, look at the pictures in the different sections, and go to every manufacturer they link to which will enable you to see what is out there. If you are lucky you may have a good bent dealer in your area. I don't.
    My own journey was to do the above and then ignore most of the advice and buy a bike that is not recommended for beginners on recumbents. The long wheelbase, 20" wheeled, Rotator Pursuit. Could not be more fun or more comfortable. About a year and half later I saw a deal on a Challenge Hurricane that I could not pass up. This is the polar opposite of the Pursuit. Short wheelbase, aluminum frame seat instead of mesh %cord, aluminum frame instead of steel, same 20" wheels. I have found that I prefer short wheelbase. There are others who swear by LWB, you can get into "socks", tailboxes, ride height, etc. No different from diamond frames. Different stokes for different folks. Try as many as you can. Or if you live in a somewhat isolated area like I do, make as informed decision as you can and deal with it. You can get bents with seats that are almost horizontal or vertical. Depends on what your neck can handle.
    Good luck.
    Bruce in far West Texas
     
  4. Timmer

    Timmer New Member

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    Thanks guys that was useful info, I know I have a recum big time dealer with lots of bike to try about 120 miles from here. Be worth the trip if not to buy to a least check out different bikes.http://www.bicycleman.com/ Interesting site with lots of info and bikes. I think buying a bent gonna be alot like any other bike test,test,test. Anymore info here on this site will be appreciated. Thanks
     
  5. tecln

    tecln New Member

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    Hello Tim,, I think youre being advised well here,, these guys do sound good and that dealer is reportedly real good. Regarding the need to be more upright,,and to have a high bb,to enhance hill climbing,,,along with reasonable low seat height,,maybe a burley,,although you may want one with more suspension,,than the lower ones have since you may be more sensitive to vibration than others. Would enjoy hearing more about how your search is going. All the best.
     
  6. hazahl

    hazahl New Member

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    Appreciate that your misfortune didn't paralyze you. I am biking on a Kettwiesel from Hase-bikes.com of Germany. It's a nice trike and well buillt. Check it out!
     
  7. jcostanz

    jcostanz New Member

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    I just noticed this thread. I purchased a Tour Easy from him about 2 years ago.

    Great dealier to deal with, Lots of selection, well worth the drive. I drove down from Niagara Falls, on July 4 to take a look, and left with a bike.


     
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