Rossi Road bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by photoman48230, Jun 1, 2004.

  1. photoman48230

    photoman48230 New Member

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    I'm new to this forum and would like anyones help in finding information on my Rossi frame. I purchased it a few years ago and I'm using it for recreational and workouts around my home. I like it very much but would like to upgrade some components on it to better suit my needs. Also, I like to know about the bike I'm riding, it's history. I don't think the company exists anymore but I do remember it from the 80's when I went through a brief biking stint. Any help in a vintage bike site would be great. Thanks:)
     
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  2. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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    Are you sure it's not a Rossin? Beatifully made Italian frames often used by the old Eastern Bloc national teams....
     
  3. photoman48230

    photoman48230 New Member

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    No, it's spelled ROSSI all over the bike. Maybe they added the N later in production?
     
  4. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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    Hmmmm.......don't know then.
     
  5. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    Some interesting insignifica"
    "Rossi" is the plural of the Italian "rosso" (means "red") and it's probably the builder's last name. I've never seen the mark.
    "Rossin" means "steed" or "noble horse", indeed a popular racing bike from the '80's, lots of Italian billboard type decals.
    "Rocinante" (Don Quijote's horse) was a play on words "rocin antes" (rocin is the Spanish equivalent of rossin) means "used to be a steed"
     
  6. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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    bugger me.....that's a lot of info. Damn nice frames, those 80's Rossins. Beautiful lugs and paintwork. :)
     
  7. rossidude

    rossidude New Member

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    Hey, I know Rossi bikes.

    No, they are NOT Rossin, or Rossignoli bikes.

    Yes they are a legitmate bike, and not some re-labelled third party product.

    Rossi is made in Povolaro, Italy (a tiny village that is one of three that make up the small city of Dueville in Vncenza, North Italy).

    As "Rossi dude", I can also inform you that these bikes are genuine, hand-made Italian bikes of excellent craftsmanship and long heritage.

    No one knows about them because (unlike the large companies like Bianchi, Rossin, Rossinoli, Colagno, etc. that pretend to be small handmade bike companies,) Rossi really is a small, historic, family-run business! As such, it is truly a collector's dream, as you can buy them for a song, since no-one is aware of their heritage.

    Yours might have been made in the 1980s, but the company has been around for a very long time, and still has two shops, Bruno Rossi and Rossi Cicli, in Polvolaro.

    Enjoy your Rossi. Keep it original. Treasure the Campy drops guides and Dubois lugs, and somewhat rustic paint (unless it is a chrome). Say things like Vesti la giuba

    Rossidude knows Rossi!!!

    Ride dude, ride!!!
     
  8. friedmikey

    friedmikey New Member

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    …and here I thought I was going to see some crazy Valentino Rossi edition bike, plastered with “The Doctor” livery - day-glow colors, flowers, silly graphics and all. Oh well…
     
  9. Virenque

    Virenque New Member

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    Hehehe I thought the same:D
     
  10. aleson

    aleson New Member

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    I was just in Italy and wandered into this little bike shop in Sienna. I talked with a guy in the shop whose name was Rossi. He was quite a bit older (maybe in his late 70's or early 80's); he didn't speak any English and I don't speak Italian. But, he showed me a couple of bikes that he made. One was from 1939 and one was from 1946. He also showed me a picture of himself on a bike at a race and another with his brothers. I went back to the shop the next day to talk with him more; he was there again, as well as a younger guy who spoke a little English. The older guy is one of the Rossi brothers and from what I could tell, they used to make bikes and race. He is the last of the brothers; the rest of them have passed away.

    Do you know anything else about these bikes? I couldn't figure out if they still made them (the bike shop carried Bianchi's and had a Bianchi sign out front). I've been trying to find out more information about them, but I haven't come up with much other than stumbling across this website and a Rossi bike for sale that was made in the 80's or 90's.

    I did get a picture of the guy standing next to the two bikes and his photo's.

    thanks,

    aleson

     
  11. Powerful Pete

    Powerful Pete New Member

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    Without knowing anything about Rossi bikes in particular, just keep in mind that Rossi (along with Bianchi and Neri) are amongst the most common last names here in Italy. Kinda like being named Smith. :)
     
  12. rossidude

    rossidude New Member

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    This is true, but there are only so many Rossi bike shops, just like there are would only be so many Smith bike shops here.

    I have checked most of these out on the web. My impression is that there is a generic Rossi bike store chain, and it does have some Rossi "house brand bikes", but they are not classic bikes. There are also a few small stores with Rossi names, but also not classic bikes.

    However, the two shops in Povalaro that I mentioned before are different. They appear to have made Rossi bikes as a historic marque. They have two shops side by side, one seems to make the bikes (Bruno Rossi) and the other one sells them.

    I would be very interested to know if there is a connection between the fellow in Sienna and the company in Povalaro. There are only a few of these roadikes around, and the good ones all have the same decal.

    Ca you share the pictures?

    I have seen some pictures of the Povalro bikes, and the emblem is identical to the one on my bike, and it is handmade.

    Their business still sponsors several local race teams throughout the province.

    There is also one famous racer of yore named Rossi, and you can look his name up in the old tour de France records. He also sponsored bike tires.
     
  13. PCCA

    PCCA New Member

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    My first "real" bike was a Rossi. I was about 16 years old. I bought the bike for about $1000 (back in 1985). It was a beautiful bike (which I still had it). I bought it from Continental Bike Shop in Detriot which was owned by the late great Mike Walden and Dale Hughes. It was the home shop of the Wolverine Sports Club, which if your from the midwest, know how big there were in the 70's and 80's.
    Beautiful bikes and legit!!!
     
  14. gemship

    gemship New Member

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    +3 :D
     
  15. mhudson

    mhudson New Member

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    I have a Rossi - bought it in 1983 from The Bike Shop in Scarborough. It set me back twice what a regular racing bike cost at the time, but when the shop owner wheeled it out "just for me to see" it was love at first sight. I put my savings on the counter as a deposit.

    It's red with Campagnolo Record gearing, Modolo Speedy brakes, Gipiemme crank, headset and seat post. Last year I completely restored it to orginal, new in box vintage Record hubs, tubulars, Sedis Gold chain, Regina freewheel and tape. I even had the Modolo pads rebuilt by Mike Berry.

    Sure it has a few scratches but after all these years, races and miles this bike carries a lot of great memories. I still ride it and hard - it's an all Italian racing bike!

    The only part I'm missing is a Silca frame pump in Red - let me know if know of one.

    I'll post photo's soon.

    Keep them on the road,
    Mike
     
  16. roger cassey

    roger cassey New Member

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    I just picked up a Rossi...the chrome Columbus frame 90's model. Fabulous bike. It's true they can be picked up for a song...I only paid $50.00 for mine. My lucky day.

     
  17. jhonmicle

    jhonmicle New Member

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    Giacomo Agostini to many people say rossi has over taken his record but Giacomo Agostini had to win in places like the isle of man and on the proper racing circuits to win his titles
     
  18. ROOKIIE

    ROOKIIE New Member

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    HAVE BEEN RIDING FOR AWHILE, ON SO SO ROAD BIKES LIKE THE CANADIAN TIRE SPECIALS. TODAY I FOUND A ROSSI ROAD BIKE AT A GARAGE SALE. IT HAS ALL THE MARKINGS, CAMPAGNOLO GEARING, MODOLO SPEEDY BRAKES, HEADSET AND POST STAMPED WITH ROSSI AND BUNCH DECALS WITH ROSSI ON THE FRAME. ALSO POVOLARO DEAL AND COLUMBUS STAMPED ON THE FRAME. IT IS AMAZING LIGHT COMPARED TO WHAT I AM RIDING KNOW. MY QUESTION IS "IS IT A ROSSI" ROOKIE
     
  19. rossidude

    rossidude New Member

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    Yes Sir,

    That sounds like the real deal.

    This family has been making bikes for a long time, but you can probably date it from the components.

    Rossi bikes often have quite nice details like perhaps a heart cutout here and there, and the gruppo is either Spanish or Italian (campy, Zeua, Rino, etc) depending on the original cost and purpose.

    Most everyone who I have heard from who has one loves it for the smooth ride, good climbing geometry, and of course, retro look and feel.

    I just love mine. It is just a very nice bike to ride and own, and while modern bikes have all the new technology, these older classics have something else.....style and grace.

    That may seem an odd statement when you consider that my old campy nuovo record shifts like a truck, the old drop shift levers are awkward, the ancient block sometimes balks on shift on its own, and the glue on tires were a pain until I changed the rims.

    But Rossi bikes have such a very fine ride quality, ability to climb, and easy speed that every time I ride mine I forget all the former glitches.

    I think everyone should have at least one old, classic road bike. Whether you use it as daily transport, a trainer, or just a collector's eye candy, it is just plain fun.

    I am sure you will come to appreciate your new (old) Rossi's light, nimble feel on the road, and rustic handmade Italian charm.

    Welcome to bike heaven.
     
    ROOKIIE likes this.
  20. ROOKIIE

    ROOKIIE New Member

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    Hey Rossidude

    Trueer words where never spoken. Picked one up at a garage sale. Needed front tire (glue on) of course everything worked great, the drop down gear shift yes a bit awkard at first but u get just to it. Gears shift flawlessly. Love the light weight, Over all a real nice bike to ride love it. Cant wait for spring or some nice weather before the snow comes.. keep riding those Rossi's ..................... Rookiie
     
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