Rotated Heart and Q waves

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Dannykewl, Jan 30, 2004.

  1. Dannykewl

    Dannykewl Guest

    Hi, I am a 50 yo male, and my doctor gave me an EKG today as part of my regular checkups. I told her
    my dad had a heart attack around that age. The tech took an EKG, but took another one thinking maybe
    she may have crossed some of the electrodes. Another one taken, she went and got the doctor, who
    double checked the wires which were OK and took another reading. She said something about certain
    aspects of Q waves, and I may have a "rotated heart", and not to worry for now as that may be the
    case, until she confirms with the cardiologist. I tried a Google search for "rotated heart q waves"
    and found very little. What I'm assuming (hopefully) is that a rotated heart is just the position of
    the heart and carries no threat healthwise, and the EKG reading is like that as the electrodes are
    not getting the right electrical impulses as the electrodes are misaligned with the position of my
    heart. How close to correct am I on this or am I way off base? TIA,

    Dan
     
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  2. dannykewl wrote:

    > Hi, I am a 50 yo male, and my doctor gave me an EKG today as part of my regular checkups. I told
    > her my dad had a heart attack around that age.

    Uh-oh.

    > The tech took an EKG, but took another one thinking maybe she may have crossed some of the
    > electrodes. Another one taken, she went and got the doctor, who double checked the wires which
    > were OK and took another reading. She said something about certain aspects of Q waves,

    Q waves would suggest that you have had a heart attack. Assuming you were not aware of the heart
    attack when it happened, this would have been a "silent" heart attack. About 25% of all heart
    attacks are "silent."

    > and I may have a "rotated heart",

    That would be largely a diagnosis of exclusion (everything else included a heart attack having been
    ruled out).

    > and not to worry for now as that may be the case, until she confirms with the cardiologist.

    It is likely that she is going to learn that you should be referred to see a cardiologist.

    > I tried a Google search for "rotated heart q waves" and found very little.

    Not surprising.

    > What I'm assuming (hopefully) is that a rotated heart is just the position of the heart and
    > carries no threat healthwise,

    Correct.

    > and the EKG reading is like that as the electrodes are not getting the right electrical impulses
    > as the electrodes are misaligned with the position of my heart. How close to correct am I on this
    > or am I way off base?

    Would be concerned about possibility that you have had a "silent" heart attack.

    > TIA,
    >

    You are welcome, Dan :)

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    --
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L21532147
     
  3. Complex592

    Complex592 Guest

    Have you ever had an EKG before? It sounds to me like the technicians came back to check the leads.
    If that was the case and they were concerned they were reversed they may have detected dextrocardia.
    That is a rotation of the heart so that it is mirror image as to normal. I have seen a few patients
    with this and they have been normal otherwise. I do know that it my be associated with other cardiac
    congenital abnormalities. If it turns out to be so... I suggest you see a cardiologist for a work up
    and and echocardiogram.
     
  4. [email protected] (Complex592) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Have you ever had an EKG before? It sounds to me like the technicians came back to check the
    > leads. If that was the case and they were concerned they were reversed they may have detected
    > dextrocardia. That is a rotation of the heart so that it is mirror image as to normal. I have seen
    > a few patients with this and they have been normal otherwise. I do know that it my be associated
    > with other cardiac congenital abnormalities. If it turns out to be so... I suggest you see a
    > cardiologist for a work up and and echocardiogram.

    And while we're on the topic of unusual Q wave findings, another anomaly that can result in differently-
    placed Q waves (in the absence of ischemia, of course) is ventricular inversion, also known as congenitally-
    corrected L-transposition.

    I think the first step is to have an actual cardiologist look at your electrocardiogram.

    - TC, md Pediatric cardiology and electrophysiology
     
  5. Dannykewl

    Dannykewl Guest

    Thanks much for everyone's reply. This does make me feel better that hopefully it's not too much to
    worry about, and if they did find I had a silent heart attack, I'll get the advice/meds that I
    need. I believe I may have had an EKG many years ago, but they didn't tell me what was in it if
    they did, or maybe if "rotated" heart was suspected, maybe they thought it wasn't threatening and
    didn't tell me. I moved around and lived in so many cities, that if I did have an EKG done, I can't
    remember where.

    "dannykewl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I am a 50 yo male, and my doctor gave me an EKG today as part of my regular checkups. I told
    > her my dad had a heart attack around that age.
    The
    > tech took an EKG, but took another one thinking maybe she may have crossed some of the electrodes.
    > Another one taken, she went and got the doctor,
    who
    > double checked the wires which were OK and took another reading. She said something about certain
    > aspects of Q waves, and I may have a "rotated heart", and not to worry for now as that may be the
    > case, until she
    confirms
    > with the cardiologist. I tried a Google search for "rotated heart q waves" and found very little.
    > What I'm assuming (hopefully) is that a rotated
    heart
    > is just the position of the heart and carries no threat healthwise, and
    the
    > EKG reading is like that as the electrodes are not getting the right electrical impulses as the
    > electrodes are misaligned with the position of
    my
    > heart. How close to correct am I on this or am I way off base? TIA,
    >
    > Dan
     
  6. "dannykewl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thanks much for everyone's reply.

    You are welcome :)

    > This does make me feel better that hopefully it's not too much to worry about, and if they did
    > find I had a silent heart attack, I'll get the advice/meds that I need.

    Hopefully, from a cardiologist.

    > I believe I may have had an EKG many years ago, but they didn't tell me what was in it if they
    > did, or maybe if "rotated" heart was suspected, maybe they thought it wasn't threatening and
    > didn't tell me.

    They would have told you about "Q waves." If you did have a "normal" EKG even many years ago, that
    would exclude either a rotated heart or dextrocardia and make "silent" heart attack the most likely
    diagnosis.

    > I moved around and lived in so many cities, that if I did have an EKG done, I can't
    > remember where.

    When are you seeing a cardiologist?

    Nonetheless, please do keep us posted about your progress.

    Humbly,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    --
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L21532147
     
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