RotoRocket Impressions

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Seth Jayson, Jun 5, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    I've got a set of Ti Rotocranks on my RANS rocket (magazine review...) so I thought I'd offer some
    first impressions.

    Now Rich Pinto and Frank 'Frankenspeed' Geyer have put thousands of miles on these, so they can give
    a better opinion from a fast guy's point of view. I'm more of a gutter bunny, putting on about
    100-150 miles a week, most of it in bumper to bumper city traffic.

    Frank told me not to expect to go any faster on these, and I trust his judgement. But I've been
    looking through my mileage logs, and I *have* been faster on these, about 3 minutes per ride on a
    commute of about an hour each way. (Today I hit a record average speed of 16.8 mph over my 15.7
    miles to work, and remember, that's with at least 3 or 4 stops per mile.) That's what, 5%? Roughly
    equivalent to the improvement claimed by the studies cited in the rotor literature. I'm not a HRM
    kind of guy, so I've got no reliable base line for effort. But I've been surprised by these speed
    increases, because over the past couple weeks, I've been consciously trying to relax more on the
    ride, and I've been getting faster anyway.

    Of course it could just be coincidence, too.

    On an even more subjective level, these cranks make my pedaling a lot easier, and a lot easier on my
    legs. I could feel that immediately -- or after 30 seconds of feeling odd. I get no knee fatigue
    with these. I do get a bit of that with my usual cranks.

    Something I did not anticipate was the increased acceleration I'd get off the line. I don't run
    stoplights (they're a chance to do some sprints, man). I noticed pretty quickly that the canting
    forward of the rotor crank seemed to give me an advantage in power, especially on the second and
    third strokes (the clip-in strokes) as I take off on the green.

    Are they worth the price? You'll have to decide that one on your own. The steel option is a couple
    hundred less than the Ti, but only weighs around 100g more. I think they're definitely something
    worth considering for people who put on a lot of miles. And there's a money-back guarantee.

    If anyone on TOMRV wants to peer at them, just flag down the tall skinny guy on the red rocket. I'll
    be putting along with the incorrect gearing (the available chainrings don't offer an optimal setup
    for a 20-inch drive wheel.)
     
    Tags:


  2. Jim H

    Jim H Guest

    "Seth Jayson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've got a set of Ti Rotocranks on my RANS rocket (magazine review...) so I thought I'd offer some
    > first impressions.

    Ummm... what are Rotocranks?

    I googled for "roto crank" and "rotocrank"....
     
  3. John Riley

    John Riley New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2003
    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. Don

    Don Guest

    Seth, are they from Rotorbike? http://www.rotorbike.com/eng/index.html

    Someone sent me the above link stating the would be better for my knees. The page opens but after
    that nothing works for me. What sizes do they come in? Don
     
  5. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    According to what I've got in this nice big media folder, they're called Rotor Technological
    Components SL (in Spain, where they are made and designed.)

    Apparently, they sometimes have web issues. There are threads about them at BROL. In the US, they
    are distributed by Howie Cohen at DIMAR, in Colorado.

    They've also been discussed at cyclingnews.com.

    they come as follows (this is from their media kit, but no guarantees on the info):

    Road double, 53/39, steel around $620, Ti $800 Road Triple, 53/39/30, steel $655, Ti $837.

    crank lengths 170, 172.5, 175, 180

    they also do mtb

    > Someone sent me the above link stating the would be better for my knees. The page opens but after
    > that nothing works for me. What sizes do they come in? Don
     
  6. This is interesting to me because it appears to have a very similar action to a crankset that I used
    to have on my bike in the early eighties.

    It was called the "Houdaille Power Cam", if I remember correctly and was manufactured by a company
    in Fort Worth, TX.

    A gentleman named Scott Dixon, also from this area, won 'Paris Brest Paris' with one of these in the
    mid eighties.

    Lewis.

    http://home.earthlink.net/~limeylew/index.html

    .........................

    John Riley <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Jim H wrote:
    > > "Seth Jayson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:b76915a0.03-
    > > [email protected]:[email protected] osting.google.com...
    > > > I've got a set of Ti Rotocranks on my RANS rocket (magazine review...) so I thought I'd
    > > > offer some first impressions.
    > > Ummm... what are Rotocranks? I googled for "roto crank" and "rotocrank"....
    >
    > See:
    >
    > http://www.totalbike.com/reviews/rotor.html
    >
    > or:
    >
    > http://www.rotorbike.com/eng/index.html
    >
    > Hey Rich Pinto, how about a report?
    >
    > John Riley
     
  7. Don

    Don Guest

    Seth, Thanks for the information. The cranks are too long (and expensive) for me.
     
  8. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    [email protected] (Lewis Campbell) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > This is interesting to me because it appears to have a very similar action to a crankset that I
    > used to have on my bike in the early eighties.
    >
    > It was called the "Houdaille Power Cam", if I remember correctly and was manufactured by a company
    > in Fort Worth, TX.
    >
    > A gentleman named Scott Dixon, also from this area, won 'Paris Brest Paris' with one of these in
    > the mid eighties.

    Indeed. (John goes to the dusty book shelf .) There is a chapter on these sorts of devices,
    including the power cam, in _Human-Powered Vehicles_ ed: Allan V. Abbott and David Gordon Wilson.
    Pub: Human Kenetics 1995. ISBN: 0-87322-827-8. The chapter is "Drive-Train Design" by Rob Price.

    The author observes, " Few bicycle racers use even the simplest of these systems, even though the
    predominance of research findings show a 2% to 5% improvement in either power output or metabolic
    energy-production efficiency."

    My theory is that conventional drive gives the racers the most flexibility in adjusting their
    cadence and gear, so they don't bother with other systems. Still, something like this might give an
    edge in a time trial.

    BTW I used to ride with Scott Dixon in Iowa City. That would have been early 70's.

    John Riley
     
  9. Rick Moll

    Rick Moll Guest

    Also, _High-Tech Cycling_ -- second edition 2003, edited by the late Edmund R. Burke, PhD, discusses
    the new Rotor crank system in the chapter "Optimizing the Crank Cycle and Pedaling Cadence" by
    Lucia, Earnest, Hoyos, and Chicharro. It summarizes,

    "Anecdotal reports by trained cyclists using the Rotor for the first time show that the new system
    appears to be especially suitable and comfortable for pedaling at high cadences (> 90 rpm). ... The
    main problem is that Rotor users complain of increased muscle soreness after several months of use.
    This could represent a major disadvantage for professional cycling ..."

    The chapter also states that the whole Spanish professional cycling team Relax-Fuenlabrada used the
    Rotor cranks for the 2002 season and had at least one important tour race win.

    Rick Moll

    john riley wrote:
    >
    > Indeed. (John goes to the dusty book shelf .) There is a chapter on these sorts of devices,
    > including the power cam, in _Human-Powered Vehicles_ ed: Allan V. Abbott and David Gordon Wilson.
    > Pub: Human Kenetics 1995. ISBN: 0-87322-827-8. The chapter is "Drive-Train Design" by Rob Price.
    >
    > The author observes, " Few bicycle racers use even the simplest of these systems, even though the
    > predominance of research findings show a 2% to 5% improvement in either power output or metabolic
    > energy-production efficiency." ...
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...