ROTTEN HUB



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A

Andrew

Guest
OK the thinner worked pretty good.Thanks Remember i was overhauling my rear hub? Well i found out
that some of the bearings are rough in 1 or 2 spots, while still keeping their brightness (which
apparently is a good sign) Also while running a ballpoint pen in the hub just where the bearings
roll i found also some rough spots just in one side. If i understood well what i read, my hub is
dead. But i'm still thinking that i will build it back and ride it untill i cant stand the grinding
noise, or as long as it rolls. Is this approach wrong for some important reason i am missing?

what would be the cheapest way to deal with it considering it is a cheap wheel: 1 Buy another hub
and rebuild the wheel without a tensiometer or even a truing stand? can it be made? can i reuse the
spokes? ( guys i'm learning a lot servicing my bike and so far i've done well at it) 2 bring it to
the store and pay them to lace it. 3 or simply getting a new wheel from nashbar or someone else?
thanks guys
 
S

Slacker

Guest
"Andrew" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> OK the thinner worked pretty good.Thanks Remember i was overhauling my rear hub? Well i found out
> that some of the bearings are rough in 1 or 2 spots, while still keeping their brightness (which
> apparently is a good sign) Also while running a ballpoint pen in the hub just where the bearings
> roll i found also some rough spots just in one side. If i understood well what i read, my hub is
> dead. But i'm still thinking that i will build it back and ride it untill i cant stand the
> grinding noise, or as long as it rolls. Is this approach wrong for some important reason i am
> missing?
>
> what would be the cheapest way to deal with it considering it is a cheap wheel: 1 Buy another hub
> and rebuild the wheel without a tensiometer or even a truing stand? can it be made? can i reuse
> the spokes? ( guys i'm learning a lot servicing my bike and so far i've done well at it) 2 bring
> it to the store and pay them to lace it. 3 or simply getting a new wheel from nashbar or someone
> else? thanks guys

No. 1 stop cross posting, then figure out what you're gonna do about the wheel.
--
Slacker
 
J

James Connell

Guest
Andrew wrote:
> OK the thinner worked pretty good.Thanks Remember i was overhauling my rear hub? Well i found out
> that some of the bearings are rough in 1 or 2 spots, while still keeping their brightness (which
> apparently is a good sign) Also while running a ballpoint pen in the hub just where the bearings
> roll i found also some rough spots just in one side. If i understood well what i read, my hub is
> dead. But i'm still thinking that i will build it back and ride it untill i cant stand the
> grinding noise, or as long as it rolls. Is this approach wrong for some important reason i am
> missing?
>
> what would be the cheapest way to deal with it considering it is a cheap wheel: 1 Buy another hub
> and rebuild the wheel without a tensiometer or even a truing stand? can it be made? can i reuse
> the spokes? ( guys i'm learning a lot servicing my bike and so far i've done well at it) 2 bring
> it to the store and pay them to lace it. 3 or simply getting a new wheel from nashbar or someone
> else? thanks guys
>
>

first, if you've never built a wheel i don't recommend trying it without a trueing stand. it can be
done but it is considerably harder to do. you can get by without a tensiometer, it just makes it
easier to not have to do it again soon ;)

as for your hub as long as the cup isn't cracked it'll go for a long time. actualy it isn't
uncommon on lower quailty hubs to have a few pits in the cup and/or the cones after relitivly
short use. check the cones, they prob have pits too, but they can be replaced fairly cheaply. get
the bearing setup right, it may be more important on the low end stuff then on a top of the line
hub. the tolerances are less exact so you get misalinements, out of rounds, and just down right
bad setup. often the hub comes from the manutacturer with the bearings Far to tight ( in some
cases they 'index' instead of roll!), and all to often it is not fixed on assembly (a *proper*
assembly includes checking/setting hubs and many other adjustments. when you by a new bike take
the wheels off and be sure the axle turns smoothly, with little friction and no play or refuse to
except it.) HTH
 
S

StøRker Moe

Guest
On 02 apr 2003, Andrew wrote:

> OK the thinner worked pretty good.Thanks Remember i was overhauling my rear hub? Well i found out
> that some of the bearings are rough in 1 or 2 spots, while still keeping their brightness (which
> apparently is a good sign) Also while running a ballpoint pen in the hub just where the bearings
> roll i found also some rough spots just in one side. If i understood well what i read, my hub is
> dead. But i'm still thinking that i will build it back and ride it untill i cant stand the
> grinding noise, or as long as it rolls. Is this approach wrong for some important reason i am
> missing?

Shouldn't think so. My front wheel has been running for a year after I found out the bearing races
were _really_ uneven ('cause I didn't check the bearing adjustment often enough :( ). I'm getting a
new one now, though, and planning to use the old one in the winter, when slush and snow gets into
everything.

> what would be the cheapest way to deal with it considering it is a cheap wheel: 1 Buy another hub
> and rebuild the wheel without a tensiometer or even a truing stand? can it be made? can i reuse
> the spokes? ( guys i'm learning a lot servicing my bike and so far i've done well at it)

A truing stand and a centering tool would make the job a LOT easier. You can use the bike as a
truing stand, though. I've rebuilt my rear wheel twice, first because I didn't trust the rim
anymore, the second time because the hub broke. I re-used the spokes both times, but changed about a
half dozen of them because they had been stretched too far. No guarantees, though. A shop will not
re-use the spokes due to warranty/damage claims from the consumer, but if you do it yourself, you're
free to re-use the spokes provided they are in good shape and you take care to not switch leading
and trailing spokes.

> 2 bring it to the store and pay them to lace it. 3 or simply getting a new wheel from nashbar or
> someone else? thanks guys
>

--
Størker Moe

Email Storker(DOT)Moe(AT)chemeng(DOT)ntnu(DOT)no WWW http://www.chemeng.ntnu.no/~stmoe/

A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
B: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
C: Top-posting.
D: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
 
D

David Kunz

Guest
Andrew wrote:
> OK the thinner worked pretty good.Thanks Remember i was overhauling my rear hub? Well i found out
> that some of the bearings are rough in 1 or 2 spots, while still keeping their brightness (which
> apparently is a good sign) Also while running a ballpoint pen in the hub just where the bearings
> roll i found also some rough spots just in one side. If i understood well what i read, my hub is
> dead. But i'm still thinking that i will build it back and ride it untill i cant stand the
> grinding noise, or as long as it rolls. Is this approach wrong for some important reason i am
> missing?
>
> what would be the cheapest way to deal with it considering it is a cheap wheel: 1 Buy another hub
> and rebuild the wheel without a tensiometer or even a truing stand? can it be made? can i reuse
> the spokes? ( guys i'm learning a lot servicing my bike and so far i've done well at it) 2 bring
> it to the store and pay them to lace it. 3 or simply getting a new wheel from nashbar or someone
> else? thanks guys
>

I've reused spokes with no problems at all. As long as they're in good condition (you didn't drop
the chain between the cassette and the spokes and tear 'em up or get a stick wedged into 'em :), and
the nipples aren't corroded which it a problem with alloy nipples).

I built my first couple of wheels "on the bike" without a truing stand. They turned out just fine. A
stand makes it amazingly easier -- especially radial truing (high and low spots).

David
 
A

Andrew Webster

Guest
"Andrew" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

> 1 Buy another hub and rebuild the wheel without a tensiometer or even a truing stand? can it be
> made? can i reuse the spokes? ( guys i'm learning a lot servicing my bike and so far i've done
> well at it)

Good idea if you want to learn about wheel building. Buy another hub with the same dimensions and
re-use the spokes, then set aside half a day or so. I have done this a few times before investing in
a truing stand (which really does make things a lot easier).

> 2 bring it to the store and pay them to lace it.

Rather pointless if it is a cheap wheel, you might be able to buy a cheap one ready made for less
than the labour charges (certainly true where I live).

> 3 or simply getting a new wheel from nashbar or someone else?
Cerainly the quickest option - but less satisfying.
 
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