Rough trail fix needed

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Destroy, Jul 29, 2003.

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  1. Destroy

    Destroy Guest

    I need to change the frt fork on the girlfriends bike to something that can minimize the shock
    transmitted to the bars. She has bad wrists.

    Terrain that its needed for are wooded trails with lots of roots, large stones, fallen trees and
    branches. Stone sizes range from golf balls to 2 basketballs(uhh..we ride around those) but mostly
    its the grapefruit and baseball sized ones that cause the most problems. There are alot of downhill
    areas (15mph) that are covered with scattered baseball sized stone. Basically kind of like going
    down a mild stair way at speed.

    For her, this is really hard on her wrists.

    Besides slowing down, what would you suggest to reduce the shock transmitted to the bars?

    Oh, she's currently riding a Specialized Enduro FSR with a stock Marzocchi MXC, 100mm travel, air
    spring, internal rebound adjustment shock.

    Thanks for the feedback.
     
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  2. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Besides slowing down, what would you suggest to reduce the shock transmitted to the bars?
    >
    > Oh, she's currently riding a Specialized Enduro FSR with a stock Marzocchi MXC, 100mm travel, air
    > spring, internal rebound adjustment
    shock.
    >
    > Thanks for the feedback.
    >

    Have you tried less air pressure in the fork? If the fork is set up for a heavy rider, she may not
    be exploiting the full shock-absorption capabilities of the fork (assuming, of course, she's not a
    heavy rider - of course, you don't see many 200 lb. women on mtbs, but that doesn't mean much).

    Also, carbon handlebars may help take the edge off. And cushier grips - try the Serfas Connectors:
    http://www.serfas.com/grips_plus/grips_plus_4.html.

    Padded gloves?

    Chris
     
  3. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I need to change the frt fork on the girlfriends bike to something that can minimize the shock
    > transmitted to the bars. She has bad wrists.
    >
    > Terrain that its needed for are wooded trails with lots of roots, large stones, fallen trees and
    > branches. Stone sizes range from golf balls to 2 basketballs(uhh..we ride around those) but mostly
    > its the grapefruit and baseball sized ones that cause the most problems. There are alot of
    > downhill areas (15mph) that are covered with scattered baseball sized stone. Basically kind of
    > like going down a mild stair way at speed.
    >
    > For her, this is really hard on her wrists.
    >
    > Besides slowing down, what would you suggest to reduce the shock transmitted to the bars?
    >
    > Oh, she's currently riding a Specialized Enduro FSR with a stock Marzocchi MXC, 100mm travel, air
    > spring, internal rebound adjustment
    shock.
    >
    > Thanks for the feedback.

    A good Marzocchi coil fork, http://cambriabike.com/bars&ends/easton_monkey_lite_xc_riser_bar.htm ,
    http://cambriabike.com/stems/easton_mg60_magnesium_xc_stem.htm and
    http://www.merchantmanager.com/timhopey/

    Sorry, but you asked.
    --
    Slacker
     
  4. Super Slinky

    Super Slinky Guest

    Destroy said...

    > Besides slowing down, what would you suggest to reduce the shock transmitted to the bars?
    >
    > Oh, she's currently riding a Specialized Enduro FSR with a stock Marzocchi MXC, 100mm travel, air
    > spring, internal rebound adjustment shock.
    >
    > Thanks for the feedback.

    How old is the shock? Maybe it just isn't broken in yet. I would have thought that shock would have
    been reasonably plush compared to some others. I know the RockShox Duke SL is plush, but it makes
    some phantom noises that may turn you off to it. Maybe a Marathon S if you want to upgrade toward
    the top of the line. Try some different pairs of gloves with good padding and maybe change the
    grips. The better grips, like Ourys, are thicker and softer. One thing you can try that won't cost
    anything is to lower the tire pressures, although judging from your description, pinch flats might
    become a problem. If so, get really wide tires or consider going tubeless. Either of these options
    should cost less than a new fork. You will want wide tires but you don't want them too heavy, if she
    intends to ride uphill with them. High grade tires with a high thread count will ride better.
    Michelin has a nice selection of high end tires. Has she tried taping her wrists? Might help.
     
  5. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Destroy wrote:
    > I need to change the frt fork on the girlfriends bike to something that can minimize the shock
    > transmitted to the bars. She has bad wrists.

    <...>

    > Oh, she's currently riding a Specialized Enduro FSR with a stock Marzocchi MXC, 100mm travel, air
    > spring, internal rebound adjustment shock.

    A 100mm 'zocchi should be more than enough for the wrists. I think you're probably looking at a more
    underlying problem - either she's got death grip or the brake levers are set at the wrong angle.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  6. Taywood

    Taywood Guest

    "Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I need to change the frt fork on the girlfriends bike to something
    that
    > can minimize the shock transmitted to the bars. She has bad wrists.

    Try adjusting the angle of the brake lever first. Is she getting the hit with elbow wrist knuckles
    in a line, or are her knuckles bent forward? Mike
     
  7. Destroy

    Destroy Guest

    >I think you're probably looking at a more underlying problem - either she's got death grip or the
    >brake levers are set at the wrong angle.
    >

    Her wrists are bad cause she has rheumatoid arthritis in both wrist. Any jarring to her wrists
    hurts, position doesn't matter that much. I suppose I should have made this more clear in my
    initial post.
     
  8. Destroy

    Destroy Guest

    >>Her wrists are bad cause she has rheumatoid arthritis in both wrist. Any jarring to her wrists
    >>hurts, position doesn't matter that much. I suppose I should have made this more clear in my
    >>initial post.
    >
    >
    > Poor thing. Perhaps the tru-fits from these folks might help....
    > http://www.fitness-health-wellness.net/wrist.injury.html
    >
    >
    Now this seems to be an interesting idea. Thanks. May take some adjusting so she can operate the
    shifting and braking well but it could help out.
     
  9. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > > you're probably looking at a more underlying problem - either she's got death grip or the brake
    > > levers are set at the wrong angle.
    > >
    >
    > Her wrists are bad cause she has rheumatoid arthritis in both wrist. Any jarring to her wrists
    > hurts, position doesn't matter that much. I suppose I should have made this more clear in my
    > initial post.

    Poor thing. Perhaps the tru-fits from these folks might help....
    http://www.fitness-health-wellness.net/wrist.injury.html
     
  10. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Destroy wrote:
    >> I think you're probably looking at a more underlying problem - either she's got death grip or the
    >> brake levers are set at the wrong angle.
    >>
    >
    > Her wrists are bad cause she has rheumatoid arthritis in both wrist. Any jarring to her wrists
    > hurts, position doesn't matter that much. I suppose I should have made this more clear in my
    > initial post.

    Yep, you probably should have. If she's got rheumatoid arthritis, there's not a whole lot you can
    do. Coil forks may help a little, but it's mountain biking and her wrists are going to get jarred no
    matter what. There's no fork that's going to make everything warm and fluffy.
     
  11. Destroy

    Destroy Guest

    > Haven't seen any in years, but there may be a few out there. Sounds kind of like using a
    > suspension seat post on a FS bike, sort of gilding the
    > lily. A carbon riser bar would have about the same effect and decrease weight in the bargain.

    So in general is it safe to say, carbon bars and carbon risers flex a fair bit as compared to alum
    ones therefore absorbing shock? Or is it that they just don't vibrate as much? Sort of like a wood
    baseball bat vs an alum bat.
     
  12. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Destroy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Haven't seen any in years, but there may be a few out there. Sounds kind of like using a
    > > suspension seat post on a FS bike, sort of gilding the
    > > lily. A carbon riser bar would have about the same effect and decrease weight in the bargain.
    >
    > So in general is it safe to say, carbon bars and carbon risers flex a fair bit as compared to alum
    > ones therefore absorbing shock? Or is it that they just don't vibrate as much? Sort of like a wood
    > baseball bat vs an alum bat.

    Carbon bars have a greater dampening affect by their very nature; it has nothing to do with flex.
    --
    Slacker
     
  13. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Slash wrote:

    >>>Do a google search on "suspension stem" and see what you like. It would have the advantage of
    >>>being the first thing to flex after her hands, bike-wise. I seem to remember Girvin (Griven?
    >>>something like that) doing one.
    >>
    >>Avoid. There's a reason they're not made any more.
    >
    >
    > Out of an insatiable need to question everything, why did they stop?

    Suspension stems date from the days when decent, long travel suspension forks didn't exist and, in
    fact, when the majority were still riding rigid. It was a cheap, halfway solution to take the sting
    out of the trail. They were crude, using a rubber bumber for suspension travel, and with only a
    small single pivot connecting bars to steerer, tended to be a little flexy. (There were other
    designs, but Girvin was the main producer).

    With a rigid fork, these problems were not so great, with the benefits seen to outweigh the
    cons. However, with the advent of better suspension they became obsolete. The crude suspension
    action counter-acted that of the forks, and having flex in both the forks and the stem made for
    a sloppy ride.

    I still think they have their place - if you're looking to take the sting out of a rigid commuter
    say, but they have no longer have a place on a mountain bike. Everything a suspension stem can do, a
    suspension fork can do infinitely better.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  14. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Fri, 01 Aug 2003 09:42:55 +0200, bomba <[email protected]> scribbled:

    >Suspension stems date from the days when decent, long travel suspension forks didn't exist and, in
    >fact, when the majority were still riding rigid. It was a cheap, halfway solution to take the sting
    >out of the trail. They were crude, using a rubber bumber for suspension travel, and with only a
    >small single pivot connecting bars to steerer, tended to be a little flexy. (There were other
    >designs, but Girvin was the main producer).
    >
    >With a rigid fork, these problems were not so great, with the benefits seen to outweigh the
    >cons. However, with the advent of better suspension they became obsolete. The crude suspension
    >action counter-acted that of the forks, and having flex in both the forks and the stem made for
    >a sloppy ride.
    >
    >I still think they have their place - if you're looking to take the sting out of a rigid commuter
    >say, but they have no longer have a place on a mountain bike. Everything a suspension stem can do,
    >a suspension fork can do infinitely better.

    Gotcha. So it wasn't necessarily that they're a terrible idea, just in the context of the OP's
    message - sus stem + sus fork. I was curious because I still see them in use, but like you
    mentioned, it seems only on touring and commuter bikes. REI's Novara Safari (rigid framed touring
    design) comes with one along with a suspension seatpost. Seems like this is what it's designed for.
    Hard to design a pannier system around suspension I suppose. :p

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
  15. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > Carbon bars have a greater dampening affect by their very nature; it has nothing to do with flex.

    Interesting. If they don't move, how would they absorb shock?
     
  16. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > > Carbon bars have a greater dampening affect by their very nature; it has nothing to do
    > > with flex.
    >
    > Interesting. If they don't move, how would they absorb shock?

    They work by not transmitting vibrations thru their entire length via dampening. Dampening and
    flexing are two completely different things, although not necessarily mutually exclusive. Good
    quality carbon bars (i.e., Easton) are very stiff.

    Could you look at a carbon bar under an electron microscope while stressed and see some fibers move,
    probably, but flex is not the proper terminology. Again, it's dampening affect.

    --
    Slacker
     
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