RR: Chamiso to Winsor

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Corvus Corvax, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. This is going to be short and incoherent.

    Did a ride from the Chamiso trailhead outside Santa Fe, a lovely
    singletrack ridgeline traverse which connects to the Winsor trail.
    Solo. Climbed up to the ski area at 10 thousand feet -- the trailhead
    is at around eight, with a nine mile climb. Felt like a lot more than a
    couple thousand feet. Took me three hours, three and a half, something
    like that, to make the climb, all on singletrack. I took along 124
    ounces of water. Drank it all, and then some (hooray for the Katadyn!)

    Got caught in a hailstorm on the last mile of the return trip. The sky
    just opened up, and buckets of pea-sized hail poured out of the sky.
    Another reason to wear a helmet, kids. The hail made an amazing sound
    as it bounced off my Giro. Total ride time was about five and a half
    hours, pretty amazing for eighteen miles, even if you factor in the
    lunch break. A sublime nine mile singletrack descent.

    I stopped into a pub and had lunch and a beer around 2:30. Picked up a
    New York times to read at lunch, and read about the ride the Tour
    riders had to do today. 12,600 feet of climbing in something like 102
    miles. I started to cry.


    CC
     
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  2. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    Corvus Corvax wrote:
    > This is going to be short and incoherent.
    >
    > Did a ride from the Chamiso trailhead outside Santa Fe, a lovely
    > singletrack ridgeline traverse which connects to the Winsor trail.
    > Solo. Climbed up to the ski area at 10 thousand feet -- the trailhead
    > is at around eight, with a nine mile climb. Felt like a lot more than
    > a couple thousand feet. Took me three hours, three and a half,
    > something like that, to make the climb, all on singletrack. I took
    > along 124 ounces of water. Drank it all, and then some (hooray for
    > the Katadyn!)
    >
    > Got caught in a hailstorm on the last mile of the return trip. The sky
    > just opened up, and buckets of pea-sized hail poured out of the sky.
    > Another reason to wear a helmet, kids. The hail made an amazing sound
    > as it bounced off my Giro. Total ride time was about five and a half
    > hours, pretty amazing for eighteen miles, even if you factor in the
    > lunch break. A sublime nine mile singletrack descent.


    Suh...weet. Believe it or not I've been caught in a hail storm -- in SAN
    DIEGO! Noble Canyon went from summer heat to winter wet (and slippery!) in
    the course of about 45 minutes. Wild.

    > I stopped into a pub and had lunch and a beer around 2:30. Picked up a
    > New York times to read at lunch, and read about the ride the Tour
    > riders had to do today. 12,600 feet of climbing in something like 102
    > miles. I started to cry.


    What's /really/ sick is they did a much harder ride yesterday and they're
    doing another century-plus tomorrow. Freaking brutal.
     
  3. MattB

    MattB Guest

    Corvus Corvax wrote:
    > This is going to be short and incoherent.
    >
    > Did a ride from the Chamiso trailhead outside Santa Fe, a lovely
    > singletrack ridgeline traverse which connects to the Winsor trail.
    > Solo. Climbed up to the ski area at 10 thousand feet -- the trailhead
    > is at around eight, with a nine mile climb. Felt like a lot more than a
    > couple thousand feet. Took me three hours, three and a half, something
    > like that, to make the climb, all on singletrack. I took along 124
    > ounces of water. Drank it all, and then some (hooray for the Katadyn!)
    >
    > Got caught in a hailstorm on the last mile of the return trip. The sky
    > just opened up, and buckets of pea-sized hail poured out of the sky.
    > Another reason to wear a helmet, kids. The hail made an amazing sound
    > as it bounced off my Giro. Total ride time was about five and a half
    > hours, pretty amazing for eighteen miles, even if you factor in the
    > lunch break. A sublime nine mile singletrack descent.
    >
    > I stopped into a pub and had lunch and a beer around 2:30. Picked up a
    > New York times to read at lunch, and read about the ride the Tour
    > riders had to do today. 12,600 feet of climbing in something like 102
    > miles. I started to cry.
    >
    >
    > CC
    >


    Sounds fun. We get those crazy hail storms pretty regularly around here.
    I've had to hide out under overhangs, in caves, or up against boulders
    to wait out hail storms many times. I've also been caught out where
    there was no shelter and my arms got all covered in welts.
    It keeps things exciting!

    Matt
     
  4. On 2005-07-14, Bill Sornson penned:
    >
    > What's /really/ sick is they did a much harder ride yesterday and
    > they're doing another century-plus tomorrow. Freaking brutal.
    >


    What's /really/ sick is that they'll do it this year, and then,
    knowing full well what they're in for, they'll do it *again* next
    year.

    I'm constantly amazed by the little things in the Tour. Like the fact
    that they can be riding uphill for miles, and then they get close to
    the top ... and they manage to accelerate! How the hell do they do
    that??

    --
    monique

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    -- Mark Twain
     
  5. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    > On 2005-07-14, Bill Sornson penned:
    >>
    >> What's /really/ sick is they did a much harder ride yesterday and
    >> they're doing another century-plus tomorrow. Freaking brutal.
    >>

    >
    > What's /really/ sick is that they'll do it this year, and then,
    > knowing full well what they're in for, they'll do it *again* next
    > year.


    And some of 'em have been doing it for MANY years. (Like Lance and Jan,
    just to name two; along with unsung old plowhorses like George Hincapie.)

    > I'm constantly amazed by the little things in the Tour. Like the fact
    > that they can be riding uphill for miles, and then they get close to
    > the top ... and they manage to accelerate! How the hell do they do
    > that??


    Actually, THAT I can understand, since I'm like an old milk horse once I
    gain sight of the barn. (Of course, I've never climbed 12,000 feet to get
    to my hay, either :)

    Bill "farm animal theme day" S.
     
  6. GeeDubb

    GeeDubb Guest

    Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    > On 2005-07-14, Bill Sornson penned:
    >>
    >> What's /really/ sick is they did a much harder ride yesterday and
    >> they're doing another century-plus tomorrow. Freaking brutal.
    >>

    >
    > What's /really/ sick is that they'll do it this year, and then,
    > knowing full well what they're in for, they'll do it *again* next
    > year.
    >
    > I'm constantly amazed by the little things in the Tour. Like the fact
    > that they can be riding uphill for miles, and then they get close to
    > the top ... and they manage to accelerate!


    "How the hell do they do that??"

    They are on something.......like their bike, six or more hours a day, most
    days of the year. Practice Practice Practice and genetics help, maybe a
    drug or two. It also helps to be 5'9" and only 139 lbs (razzy) unlike my
    large boned personna of 5'9" and 195 lbs........

    It was good to see a big man win the mountains on Sunday.

    Gary
     
  7. GeeDubb

    GeeDubb Guest

    Bill Sornson wrote:
    >
    > Bill "farm animal theme day" S.


    moo
     
  8. On 2005-07-20, GeeDubb penned:
    > Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
    >>
    >> I'm constantly amazed by the little things in the Tour. Like the
    >> fact that they can be riding uphill for miles, and then they get
    >> close to the top ... and they manage to accelerate!

    >
    > "How the hell do they do that??"
    >
    > They are on something.......like their bike, six or more hours a
    > day, most days of the year. Practice Practice Practice and genetics
    > help, maybe a drug or two. It also helps to be 5'9" and only 139
    > lbs (razzy) unlike my large boned personna of 5'9" and 195
    > lbs........


    Sure, it all helps, but a lot of it is time in the saddle, and I
    respect and admire that.

    > It was good to see a big man win the mountains on Sunday.


    Yeah, when that chick won the ... oh, wait. Nevermind ...

    Believe me, if you think it's rare to see a large-boned man win, well,
    there are even less-likely scenarios =)

    --
    monique

    "Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live."
    -- Mark Twain
     
  9. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-07-14, Bill Sornson penned:
    > >
    > > What's /really/ sick is they did a much harder ride yesterday and
    > > they're doing another century-plus tomorrow. Freaking brutal.
    > >

    >
    > What's /really/ sick is that they'll do it this year, and then,
    > knowing full well what they're in for, they'll do it *again* next
    > year.
    >
    > I'm constantly amazed by the little things in the Tour. Like the fact
    > that they can be riding uphill for miles, and then they get close to
    > the top ... and they manage to accelerate! How the hell do they do
    > that??


    Medication's what you need, if you wanna be a record breaker.



    Shaun aRe
     
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